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8-step problem solving process, organizational effectiveness.

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Step 1: Define the Problem

  • What is the problem?
  • How did you discover the problem?
  • When did the problem start and how long has this problem been going on?
  • Is there enough data available to contain the problem and prevent it from getting passed to the next process step? If yes, contain the problem.

Step 2: Clarify the Problem

  • What data is available or needed to help clarify, or fully understand the problem?
  • Is it a top priority to resolve the problem at this point in time?
  • Are additional resources required to clarify the problem? If yes, elevate the problem to your leader to help locate the right resources and form a team. 
  •  Consider a Lean Event (Do-it, Burst, RPI, Project).
  • ∙Ensure the problem is contained and does not get passed to the next process step.

Step 3: Define the Goals

  • What is your end goal or desired future state?
  • What will you accomplish if you fix this problem?
  • What is the desired timeline for solving this problem?

Step 4: Identify Root Cause of the Problem

  • Identify possible causes of the problem.
  • Prioritize possible root causes of the problem.
  • What information or data is there to validate the root cause?

Step 5: Develop Action Plan

  • Generate a list of actions required to address the root cause and prevent problem from getting to others.
  • Assign an owner and timeline to each action.
  • Status actions to ensure completion.

Step 6: Execute Action Plan

  • Implement action plan to address the root cause.
  • Verify actions are completed.

Step 7: Evaluate the Results

  • Monitor and Collect Data.
  • Did you meet your goals defined in step 3? If not, repeat the 8-Step Process. 
  • Were there any unforeseen consequences?
  • If problem is resolved, remove activities that were added previously to contain the problem.

Step 8: Continuously Improve

  • Look for additional opportunities to implement solution.
  • Ensure problem will not come back and communicate lessons learned.
  • If needed, repeat the 8-Step Problem Solving Process to drive further improvements.

Listening.

Problem Solving

Creativity

Staying Positive

Aiming High

Aiming High

Leadership

To achieve Step 1, individuals will be able to identify when they need help, and find someone appropriate who can help them with to complete the task.  

In the previous step, individuals showed that they could complete tasks by following instructions. This step builds on that by introducing the idea that they might be able to seek help if they are unable to do something by themselves.

Building blocks

The building blocks of this step are learning:

  • When do I need help 
  • Who can I turn to for help

Reflection questions

  • How does it feel when you need help?
  • When do you ask others for help?
  • Who can you turn to in different areas of your life for help?
  • How do you know who the best people are to help you with different problems?

What you need to know

When do i need help.

There are times when we all find something too difficult to be able to do by ourselves.

There might be several reasons why we might need help:

  • We don’t understand something.
  • We haven’t done something before and can’t work out how to do it.
  • We are not trained to do something that might be dangerous.
  • We are in a new place.

Think before asking for help

Before we ask for help, it is always worth taking a bit of time to think about the problem again. 

  • Are there any instructions available that might help us? 
  • Can we remember doing something like this before?
  • Can we think of any ways of solving the problem ourselves?

Don't panic!

Sometimes when we need help, we can feel worried or upset. However, it is best not to panic – there is almost always someone who can help us.

Who can I turn to for help?

We all have different people we know who can help us in various areas of our lives. 

In education, we have friends, teachers and other members of staff who might be able to help us if we are struggling with school work, feeling upset or finding something too complicated. 

In work, friends, colleagues or managers might all be able to help us.

Outside of school or work, we have parents and carers, wider family, other people we know in our communities as well as friends who might be able to help us. They can help us with lots of different problems in our lives if we ask for help.

What to think about before asking for help

Before asking for help with a problem, it is good to think:

  • Why do I think this person might be able to help me?
  • Who else could I ask if they are not the right person?
  • How will I explain to them what the problem is, so that they can help me?

Keep your options open

If the first person you think of can’t help you, don’t give up – you could ask them who they think might be able to help you instead, or you could think of other people yourself.

Individuals

Organisations, parents & carers, why this skill step matters in education.

There are times when we all can find something difficult. This maybe because we do not understand something. This can often happen when we are trying to learn something new. As a learner this can feel like a problem. As we think about the problem we have, it is always worth remembering to look back at any instructions we have been given, or thinking if the problem is like another we have had before which make help us solve it. The important thing is to not panic. There is almost always someone who will be able to help us become ‘unstuck’: a friend, a teacher or lecturer, or another member of staff.

Why this skill step matters in the workplace

At work there are often many tasks to be done. It is therefore very likely, that sometimes you may feel you have a problem and need some help. When you feel like this, it is always worth pausing for a moment and thinking about who is going to be best placed to help you with this particular problem. Will a colleague be able to advise? Do you need to ask your manager for support or further training? Who will have the knowledge or experience, as well as the time to help? What if they cannot help you come to a solution? What will your next move be? As you consider your plan, the important thing is not to give up if the first person you ask is unable to help you. They might be able to suggest someone else or recommend another way of finding the answer for yourself. It will be essential that any task is completed.  

Why this skill step matters in the wider world

There is a saying ‘if a job is worth doing, it is worth doing well’.  This could be any job or task in the home, in education, in your place or work. It is inevitable from time to time you will come across a problem in one of these areas. A problem may present itself and you may feel you need some help to find a solution to move forward. It is important not to panic or worry when this happens.  Instead, think carefully about the situation. Recall any instructions you were given and think about whether a parent or carer, a friend, a neighbour, a teacher, a colleague, a manager or other person we know (or even someone totally different) might be able to help you. There are many people and organisations who can offer support if we ask for help.

How to practise this skill step

To best practise this step of Problem Solving, apply what you have learnt to a real-life situation. Choose one or more of the activities below, remind yourself of the key points and strategies in the step, and have a go!

  • Think of a problem you have had in the past. Who did you ask for help? Why did you ask that particular person? What was it about them that meant you thought they would be able to help you at that moment?
  • Write a list of the people you would ask for help if you had a problem that needed solving in different areas of your life – consider a problem you could have at home, in education, or the workplace.
  • Consider who your ‘go to’ person is. Why do you feel they would be best placed to help you?
  • Find out about different support and advice services through your place of work, education or community who can help when you have a specific problem. There is always someone who can help you.

Build this step

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Teaching It

To teach this step:

  • The teacher can talk learners through some examples of problems that they might have, which they need other people to help them to solve. This modelling can be extended to show how they think about some of those questions before asking for help (Are there any instructions available? Etc.) 
  • Learners can then talk through some ideas of the sorts of the problems that they had before with which they needed help. Are there problems in common? Who did they ask for help? These can be used to think about who might be people in the learners’ lives who they could go to for help. 
  • Learners can be given some problems to solve which need them to ask a different person for help (for example, finding out who the tallest person in the class is, finding out the history of their family, or solving a difficult maths problem).

Reinforcing it

This step can be naturally reinforced in class. For example, it could become a mantra that when learners are struggling with something, they have to ask themselves the three questions:

  • Can we think of any ways of solving the problem ourselves? 

If they still do need help, they can be encouraged to think about who the best person to ask is, and who else could help them if they can’t. 

Assessing it 

This step can be assessed through sustained observation – for example, observing the behaviour of a learner over a sustained time and whether they can identify those problems that they genuinely need help with, and then ask an appropriate person for that help.

Alternatively, an activity could be used as the basis of assessment, as suggested in the Teaching It section above with a range of problems that need different people to help (as well as potentially a couple that learners should be able to resolve alone).

Education toolkit cover image

Build it at work: 

This step is relevant to all individuals who are involved in solving problems at work. 

To build this step in the work environment, managers could:

  • Discuss with an individual when they might need to ask other people to help them solve a problem. During this discussion a manager might reference some of the reasons listed in the section above.
  • Model a process to identify who is appropriate to ask for help. A manager might demonstrate by asking themselves the questions listed in the who can I turn to for help. This provide an example of how to identify these appropriate individuals. 
  • Task an individual to use this process to list three appropriate people who might be able to help them routine work problems. 
  • Reflect with the individual about how confident they feel about finding someone to help them complete a difficult task. 

Practising it:

There are plenty of opportunities for building this skill in the workplace:

  • Working with colleagues:  When others are relying on you to correctly perform a duty or task.
  • Working with customers or clients: When unsure of what action to take to address an issue raised by a customer or client.

Reviewing it:

For those already employed, this step is best assessed through observation. For instance:

  • Observing an individual’s response when they are stuck on a task to identify whether they ask for help at an appropriate point. 

Spotting it in recruitment: 

During the recruitment process, this step could be assessed by:

  • Asking the individual to describe what they would do if they encountered a task too difficult to complete by themselves.
  • Setting a challenge that the individual will need support to complete and seeing if they ask for that help. 

Employers toolkit cover image

We work with a wide range of organisations, who use the Skills Builder approach in lots of different settings – from youth clubs, to STEM organisations, to careers and employability providers.

We have a lot of materials available to support you to use the Skills Builder Universal Framework with the individuals you work with, including:

  • Tools for self-reflection
  • Materials to support you to teach the skills, if appropriate in your setting
  • Reward systems like printable certificates

We also do a lot of work with organisations who join the Skills Builder Partnership to build the Universal Framework into their work and impact measurement systems. You can find out a lot more using the links below.

More resources

Organisations toolkit cover image

At home, you can easily support your child to build their essential skills. The good news is that there are lots of ways that you can have a big impact, including:

  • Talking with your child about the essential skills, what they are and how they are useful in all aspects of life, whether at school, home or in the workplace
  • Talking about how you use these skill steps in your own work or wider life
  • Helping your child to identify where they already build their skills at school, at home or through other activities and clubs
  • Praising your child when they show they are using the skills well, and helping them to feel a sense of achievement
  • Encouraging them to recognise and talk confidently about their skill strengths with others, and supporting them to develop their skills further
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Problem solving

Sometimes, it is not enough to just cope with the problems – they need to be solved.

Most people engage in problem solving every day. It occurs automatically for many of the small decisions that need to be made on a daily basis.

For example, when making a decision about whether to get up now or sleep in for an extra 10 minutes, the possible choices and the relative risks and benefits of obeying the alarm clock or sleeping later come automatically to mind.

Larger problems are addressed in a similar way. For example: “I have tasks that need to be done by the end of the week. How am I going to get them all done on time?”

After considering the possible strategies, 1 is chosen and implemented. If it proves to be ineffective, a different strategy is tried.

People who can define problems, consider options, make choices, and implement a plan have all the basic skills required for effective problem solving.

Sometimes following a step-by-step procedure for defining problems, generating solutions, and implementing solutions can make the process of problem solving seem less overwhelming.

Six step guide to help you solve problems

Step 1: identify and define the problem.

  • State the problem as clearly as possible. For example: “I don’t have enough money to pay the bills.”
  • Be specific about the behaviour, situation, timing, and circumstances that make it a problem. For example: “I need to pay the phone and gas bills, and I don’t have enough money to cover both this month.”

Step 2: Generate possible solutions

  • List all the possible solutions; don’t worry about the quality of the solutions at this stage.
  • Try to list at least 15 solutions, be creative and forget about the quality of the solution.
  • If you allow yourself to be creative you may come up with some solutions that you would not otherwise have thought about.

Step 3: Evaluate alternatives      

  • The next step is to go through and eliminate less desirable or unreasonable solutions.
  • Order the remaining solutions in order of preference.
  • Evaluate the remaining solutions in terms of their advantages and disadvantages.

Step 4: Decide on a solution      

  • Specify who will take action.
  • Specify how the solution will be implemented.
  • Specify when the solution will be implemented. For example: tomorrow morning, phone the gas company and negotiate to pay the gas bill next month.

Step 5: Implement the solution

  • Implement the solution as planned.

Step 6: Evaluate the outcome

  • Evaluate how effective the solution was.
  • Decide whether the existing plan needs to be revised, or whether a new plan is needed to better address the problem.
  • If you are not pleased with the outcome, return to step 2 to select a new solution or revise the existing solution, and repeat the remaining steps.

Problem solving is something we do every day.

Some problems are small or easily solved - others are more complicated and can seem overwhelming.

One way of tackling problems is to use a specific and systematic problem solving procedure. If you’ve tried to solve certain problems without much success, try these steps out and see if they help.

Learning to solve problems effectively will help you to minimise the level of stress in your life and improve your overall sense of well-being.

Try it out and see.

Where to get help

Centre for Clinical Interventions (CCI)

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See your doctor

Visit healthdirect (external site) or call 1800 022 222, mental health emergency response line (mherl).

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  • Peel: 1800 676 822
  • Rural and remote areas 1800 552 002
  • Most people engage in problem solving daily.
  • Sometimes following a step-by-step process to define problems, consider options and make choices can make problem solving less overwhelming.
  • You can always talk to your doctor or mental health practitioner and ask for help.

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7 Steps to an Effective Problem-Solving Process

September 1, 2016 | Leadership Articles

7 Steps to an Effective Problem-Solving Process

An effective problem-solving process is one of the key attributes that separate great leaders from average ones.

Being a successful leader doesn’t mean that you don’t have any problems. Rather, it means that you know how to solve problems effectively as they arise. If you never had to deal with any problems, chances are pretty high that your company doesn’t really need you. They could hire an entry-level person to do your job!

Unfortunately, there are many examples of leaders out there who have been promoted to management or leadership positions because they are competent and excel in the technical skills needed to do the work. These people find themselves suddenly needing to “think on their feet” and solve problems that are far more high-level and complicated than they’ve ever really had to deal with before. Are there tools available to these people to help them solve the problem correctly and effectively? Absolutely!

Today, I am going to introduce you to the Seven Steps of Effective Problem Solving that Bullet Proof® Managers are learning about, developing, and implementing in their teams.

Step 1: Identify the Problem

What are things like when they are the way we want them to be?

This question helps you find the standard against which we’re going to measure where we are now. If things were going the way we want them to go, what does that look like? If this person were doing the job we want him or her to do, what would they be doing?

And then ask this important question: How much variation from the norm is tolerable?

Therein lies the problem. From an engineering perspective, you might have very little tolerance. From a behavioral perspective, you might have more tolerance. You might say it’s okay with me when this person doesn’t do it exactly as I say because I’m okay with them taking some liberty with this. Some other issue you may need 100% compliance.

Step 2: Analyze the Problem

At what stage is this problem? This helps you identify the urgency of the problem, and there are generally three stages.

The emergent stage is where the problem is just beginning to happen. It does not cause an immediate threat to the way business operates every day. It is just beginning to happen and you have time on your side to be able to correct it without it causing much damage to the processes it is affecting. The mature stage is where this problem is causing more than just minor damage. Some amount of damage has been done, and you need to jump on it immediately to fix it before it becomes a problem where the consequences may be greater, deeper, and more expensive if we don’t solve this problem fast.

The third stage is the crisis stage, when the problem is so serious it must be corrected immediately. At this stage, real damage has been done to company processes, reputation, finances, etc. that will have potentially long-term effects on your ability to do business.

Step 3: Describe the Problem

You should be able to describe a problem by writing it in the form of a statement and you should do it in 12 words or less, assuming it’s not a complicated, scientific problem. This way, you have clarity exactly what the issue is. Then, perhaps try distributing it to your team to ensure they agree that this is the root of the problem, that it makes sense, and everyone that is working toward a solution is working toward the same goal.

The most important question of all, when describing your problem: Is your premise correct?

Let me give you an example of what I mean. We’ve all heard – or read – the story of the engineer’s take on the old “half empty, half full” question. A speaker holds up the glass of water and asks if the glass is half empty or half full, a discussion within the group ensues, and you generally expect some sort of lesson in optimism, etc. from it. In this version, an engineer is in the room and answers, “I see this glass of water as being twice the size it needs to be.”

You see, sometimes when you are the one in charge of the problem, you tend to set the premise of the problem from your own perspective. But, that premise may not be accurate, or it may just need an alternate perspective from which to see it. If your premise is not correct, or at least incomplete, you are not fully understanding the problem and considering all the best options for a solution.

Step 4: Look for Root Causes

This step involves asking and answering a lot of questions. Ask questions like: What caused this problem? Who is responsible for this problem? When did this problem first emerge? Why did this happen? How did this variance from the standard come to be? Where does it hurt us the most? How do we go about resolving this problem?

Also, ask the most important question: Can we solve this problem for good so it will never occur again? Because an important aspect to leadership is coming up with solutions that people can use for a long-term benefit, rather than having to deal with the same problems over and over and over.

Step 5: Develop Alternate Solutions

Just about any problem you have to deal with has more solutions to it than the one that you think of first. So, it is best to develop a list of alternate solutions that you and your team can assess and decide which one will be the best for the particular problem. I often use the ⅓ + 1 Rule to create consensus around one – or the top two or three solutions – that will be best for everyone involved.

Then rank those solutions based on efficiency, cost, long-term value, what resources you have and that you can commit to the solution of the problem. Then, look at every one of those solutions carefully and decide what you believe to be the best solution to this problem at this time.

Step 6: Implement the Solution

Implementing the solution you decide on can include creating an implementation plan. It could also include planning on what happens next if something goes wrong with the solution if it doesn’t work out the way you thought it would. Implementation means that everyone on your team knows and understands their part in making the solution work, that there are timelines for execution, and also that you have a system in place to track whether or not the solution has corrected the problem.

Step 7: Measure the Results

From your implementation plan in step 6, make sure you track and measure the results so you can answer questions such as: Did it work? Was this a good solution? Did we learn something here in the implementation that we could apply to other potential problems?

These seven simple steps will help you become a more effective, efficient problem solver in your organization. As you practice this process and develop the skills, these steps will become more natural to you until the point that you are using them without noticing!

About Crestcom International, LLC.

Crestcom International, LLC is an international leadership development organization, training more than one million leaders for 25,000 businesses in over 60 countries across the globe. Crestcom achieves this through a blend of live-facilitated multimedia video, interactive exercises, and shared learning experiences. Crestcom implements action plans and coaching accountability sessions to ensure measured development in key leadership competency areas. For more information, please contact your local Crestcom representative found here .

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Article • 4 min read

The Problem-Solving Process

Looking at the basic problem-solving process to help keep you on the right track.

By the Mind Tools Content Team

Problem-solving is an important part of planning and decision-making. The process has much in common with the decision-making process, and in the case of complex decisions, can form part of the process itself.

We face and solve problems every day, in a variety of guises and of differing complexity. Some, such as the resolution of a serious complaint, require a significant amount of time, thought and investigation. Others, such as a printer running out of paper, are so quickly resolved they barely register as a problem at all.

what is step no 1 of problem solving

Despite the everyday occurrence of problems, many people lack confidence when it comes to solving them, and as a result may chose to stay with the status quo rather than tackle the issue. Broken down into steps, however, the problem-solving process is very simple. While there are many tools and techniques available to help us solve problems, the outline process remains the same.

The main stages of problem-solving are outlined below, though not all are required for every problem that needs to be solved.

what is step no 1 of problem solving

1. Define the Problem

Clarify the problem before trying to solve it. A common mistake with problem-solving is to react to what the problem appears to be, rather than what it actually is. Write down a simple statement of the problem, and then underline the key words. Be certain there are no hidden assumptions in the key words you have underlined. One way of doing this is to use a synonym to replace the key words. For example, ‘We need to encourage higher productivity ’ might become ‘We need to promote superior output ’ which has a different meaning.

2. Analyze the Problem

Ask yourself, and others, the following questions.

  • Where is the problem occurring?
  • When is it occurring?
  • Why is it happening?

Be careful not to jump to ‘who is causing the problem?’. When stressed and faced with a problem it is all too easy to assign blame. This, however, can cause negative feeling and does not help to solve the problem. As an example, if an employee is underperforming, the root of the problem might lie in a number of areas, such as lack of training, workplace bullying or management style. To assign immediate blame to the employee would not therefore resolve the underlying issue.

Once the answers to the where, when and why have been determined, the following questions should also be asked:

  • Where can further information be found?
  • Is this information correct, up-to-date and unbiased?
  • What does this information mean in terms of the available options?

3. Generate Potential Solutions

When generating potential solutions it can be a good idea to have a mixture of ‘right brain’ and ‘left brain’ thinkers. In other words, some people who think laterally and some who think logically. This provides a balance in terms of generating the widest possible variety of solutions while also being realistic about what can be achieved. There are many tools and techniques which can help produce solutions, including thinking about the problem from a number of different perspectives, and brainstorming, where a team or individual write as many possibilities as they can think of to encourage lateral thinking and generate a broad range of potential solutions.

4. Select Best Solution

When selecting the best solution, consider:

  • Is this a long-term solution, or a ‘quick fix’?
  • Is the solution achievable in terms of available resources and time?
  • Are there any risks associated with the chosen solution?
  • Could the solution, in itself, lead to other problems?

This stage in particular demonstrates why problem-solving and decision-making are so closely related.

5. Take Action

In order to implement the chosen solution effectively, consider the following:

  • What will the situation look like when the problem is resolved?
  • What needs to be done to implement the solution? Are there systems or processes that need to be adjusted?
  • What will be the success indicators?
  • What are the timescales for the implementation? Does the scale of the problem/implementation require a project plan?
  • Who is responsible?

Once the answers to all the above questions are written down, they can form the basis of an action plan.

6. Monitor and Review

One of the most important factors in successful problem-solving is continual observation and feedback. Use the success indicators in the action plan to monitor progress on a regular basis. Is everything as expected? Is everything on schedule? Keep an eye on priorities and timelines to prevent them from slipping.

If the indicators are not being met, or if timescales are slipping, consider what can be done. Was the plan realistic? If so, are sufficient resources being made available? Are these resources targeting the correct part of the plan? Or does the plan need to be amended? Regular review and discussion of the action plan is important so small adjustments can be made on a regular basis to help keep everything on track.

Once all the indicators have been met and the problem has been resolved, consider what steps can now be taken to prevent this type of problem recurring? It may be that the chosen solution already prevents a recurrence, however if an interim or partial solution has been chosen it is important not to lose momentum.

Problems, by their very nature, will not always fit neatly into a structured problem-solving process. This process, therefore, is designed as a framework which can be adapted to individual needs and nature.

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What Is Problem Solving? Steps, Techniques, and Best Practices Explained

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Problem solving is the art of identifying problems and implementing the best possible solutions. Revisiting your problem-solving skills may be the missing piece to leveraging the performance of your business, achieving Lean success, or unlocking your professional potential. 

Ask any colleague if they’re an effective problem-solver and their likely answer will be, “Of course! I solve problems every day.” 

Problem solving is part of most job descriptions, sure. But not everyone can do it consistently. 

The Problem-Solving Process

Problem solving is the process of defining a problem, identifying its root cause, prioritizing and selecting potential solutions, and implementing the chosen solution.

There’s no one-size-fits-all problem-solving process. Often, it’s a unique methodology that aligns your short- and long-term objectives with the resources at your disposal. Nonetheless, many paradigms center problem solving as a pathway for achieving one’s goals faster and smarter. 

One example is the Six Sigma framework , which emphasizes eliminating errors and refining the customer experience, thereby improving business outcomes. Developed originally by Motorola, the Six Sigma process identifies problems from the perspective of customer satisfaction and improving product delivery. 

Lean management, a similar method, is about streamlining company processes over time so they become “leaner” while producing better outcomes. 

Trendy business management lingo aside, both of these frameworks teach us that investing in your problem solving process for personal and professional arenas will bring better productivity.

Operations Manager or Auditor? Your Choice

Operations Manager or Auditor? Your Choice

How to Solve Problems: 5 Steps

1. precisely identify problems.

As obvious as it seems, identifying the problem is the first step in the problem-solving process. Pinpointing a problem at the beginning of the process will guide your research, collaboration, and solutions in the right direction. 

At this stage, your task is to identify the scope and substance of the problem. Ask yourself a series of questions: 

  • What’s the problem? 
  • How many subsets of issues are underneath this problem? 
  • What subject areas, departments of work, or functions of business can best define this problem? 

Although some problems are naturally large in scope, precision is key. Write out the problems as statements in planning sheets . Should information or feedback during a later step alter the scope of your problem, revise the statements. 

Framing the problem at this stage will help you stay focused if distractions come up in later stages. Furthermore, how you frame a problem will aid your search for a solution. A strategy of building Lean success, for instance, will emphasize identifying and improving upon inefficient systems. 

2. Collect Information and Plan 

The second step is to collect information and plan the brainstorming process. This is another foundational step to road mapping your problem-solving process. Data, after all, is useful in identifying the scope and substance of your problems. 

Collecting information on the exact details of the problem, however, is done to narrow the brainstorming portion to help you evaluate the outcomes later. Don’t overwhelm yourself with unnecessary information — use the problem statements that you identified in step one as a north star in your research process. 

This stage should also include some planning. Ask yourself:

  • What parties will ultimately decide a solution? 
  • Whose voices and ideas should be heard in the brainstorming process? 
  • What resources are at your disposal for implementing a solution? 

Establish a plan and timeline for steps 3-5. 

3. Brainstorm Solutions

Brainstorming solutions is the bread and butter of the problem-solving process. At this stage, focus on generating creative ideas. As long as the solution directly addresses the problem statements and achieves your goals, don’t immediately rule it out. 

Moreover, solutions are rarely a one-step answer and are more like a roadmap with a set of actions. As you brainstorm ideas, map out these solutions visually and include any relevant factors such as costs involved, action steps, and involved parties. 

With Lean success in mind, stay focused on solutions that minimize waste and improve the flow of business ecosystems. 

Fast Track Your Career in Quality Management

Fast Track Your Career in Quality Management

4. Decide and Implement

The most critical stage is selecting a solution. Easier said than done. Consider the criteria that has arisen in previous steps as you decide on a solution that meets your needs. 

Once you select a course of action, implement it. 

Practicing due diligence in earlier stages of the process will ensure that your chosen course of action has been evaluated from all angles. Often, efficient implementation requires us to act correctly and successfully the first time, rather than being hurried and sloppy. Further compilations will create more problems, bringing you back to step 1. 

5. Evaluate

Exercise humility and evaluate your solution honestly. Did you achieve the results you hoped for? What would you do differently next time? 

As some experts note, formulating feedback channels into your evaluation helps solidify future success. A framework like Lean success, for example, will use certain key performance indicators (KPIs) like quality, delivery success, reducing errors, and more. Establish metrics aligned with company goals to assess your solutions.

Master skills like measurement system analysis, lean principles, hypothesis testing, process analysis and DFSS tools with our Lean Six Sigma Green Belt Training Course . Sign-up today!

Train to Solve Problems With Lean Today

Become a quality expert with Simplilearn’s Lean Six Sigma Green Belt . This Lean Six Sigma certification program will help you gain key skills to excel in digital transformation projects while improving quality and ultimate business results.

In this course, you will learn about two critical operations management methodologies – Lean practices and Six Sigma to accelerate business improvement.

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