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What It Takes to Give a Great Presentation

  • Carmine Gallo

what are presentation requirements

Five tips to set yourself apart.

Never underestimate the power of great communication. It can help you land the job of your dreams, attract investors to back your idea, or elevate your stature within your organization. But while there are plenty of good speakers in the world, you can set yourself apart out by being the person who can deliver something great over and over. Here are a few tips for business professionals who want to move from being good speakers to great ones: be concise (the fewer words, the better); never use bullet points (photos and images paired together are more memorable); don’t underestimate the power of your voice (raise and lower it for emphasis); give your audience something extra (unexpected moments will grab their attention); rehearse (the best speakers are the best because they practice — a lot).

I was sitting across the table from a Silicon Valley CEO who had pioneered a technology that touches many of our lives — the flash memory that stores data on smartphones, digital cameras, and computers. He was a frequent guest on CNBC and had been delivering business presentations for at least 20 years before we met. And yet, the CEO wanted to sharpen his public speaking skills.

what are presentation requirements

  • Carmine Gallo is a Harvard University instructor, keynote speaker, and author of 10 books translated into 40 languages. Gallo is the author of The Bezos Blueprint: Communication Secrets of the World’s Greatest Salesman  (St. Martin’s Press).

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  • PLoS Comput Biol
  • v.17(12); 2021 Dec

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Ten simple rules for effective presentation slides

Kristen m. naegle.

Biomedical Engineering and the Center for Public Health Genomics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia, United States of America

Introduction

The “presentation slide” is the building block of all academic presentations, whether they are journal clubs, thesis committee meetings, short conference talks, or hour-long seminars. A slide is a single page projected on a screen, usually built on the premise of a title, body, and figures or tables and includes both what is shown and what is spoken about that slide. Multiple slides are strung together to tell the larger story of the presentation. While there have been excellent 10 simple rules on giving entire presentations [ 1 , 2 ], there was an absence in the fine details of how to design a slide for optimal effect—such as the design elements that allow slides to convey meaningful information, to keep the audience engaged and informed, and to deliver the information intended and in the time frame allowed. As all research presentations seek to teach, effective slide design borrows from the same principles as effective teaching, including the consideration of cognitive processing your audience is relying on to organize, process, and retain information. This is written for anyone who needs to prepare slides from any length scale and for most purposes of conveying research to broad audiences. The rules are broken into 3 primary areas. Rules 1 to 5 are about optimizing the scope of each slide. Rules 6 to 8 are about principles around designing elements of the slide. Rules 9 to 10 are about preparing for your presentation, with the slides as the central focus of that preparation.

Rule 1: Include only one idea per slide

Each slide should have one central objective to deliver—the main idea or question [ 3 – 5 ]. Often, this means breaking complex ideas down into manageable pieces (see Fig 1 , where “background” information has been split into 2 key concepts). In another example, if you are presenting a complex computational approach in a large flow diagram, introduce it in smaller units, building it up until you finish with the entire diagram. The progressive buildup of complex information means that audiences are prepared to understand the whole picture, once you have dedicated time to each of the parts. You can accomplish the buildup of components in several ways—for example, using presentation software to cover/uncover information. Personally, I choose to create separate slides for each piece of information content I introduce—where the final slide has the entire diagram, and I use cropping or a cover on duplicated slides that come before to hide what I’m not yet ready to include. I use this method in order to ensure that each slide in my deck truly presents one specific idea (the new content) and the amount of the new information on that slide can be described in 1 minute (Rule 2), but it comes with the trade-off—a change to the format of one of the slides in the series often means changes to all slides.

An external file that holds a picture, illustration, etc.
Object name is pcbi.1009554.g001.jpg

Top left: A background slide that describes the background material on a project from my lab. The slide was created using a PowerPoint Design Template, which had to be modified to increase default text sizes for this figure (i.e., the default text sizes are even worse than shown here). Bottom row: The 2 new slides that break up the content into 2 explicit ideas about the background, using a central graphic. In the first slide, the graphic is an explicit example of the SH2 domain of PI3-kinase interacting with a phosphorylation site (Y754) on the PDGFR to describe the important details of what an SH2 domain and phosphotyrosine ligand are and how they interact. I use that same graphic in the second slide to generalize all binding events and include redundant text to drive home the central message (a lot of possible interactions might occur in the human proteome, more than we can currently measure). Top right highlights which rules were used to move from the original slide to the new slide. Specific changes as highlighted by Rule 7 include increasing contrast by changing the background color, increasing font size, changing to sans serif fonts, and removing all capital text and underlining (using bold to draw attention). PDGFR, platelet-derived growth factor receptor.

Rule 2: Spend only 1 minute per slide

When you present your slide in the talk, it should take 1 minute or less to discuss. This rule is really helpful for planning purposes—a 20-minute presentation should have somewhere around 20 slides. Also, frequently giving your audience new information to feast on helps keep them engaged. During practice, if you find yourself spending more than a minute on a slide, there’s too much for that one slide—it’s time to break up the content into multiple slides or even remove information that is not wholly central to the story you are trying to tell. Reduce, reduce, reduce, until you get to a single message, clearly described, which takes less than 1 minute to present.

Rule 3: Make use of your heading

When each slide conveys only one message, use the heading of that slide to write exactly the message you are trying to deliver. Instead of titling the slide “Results,” try “CTNND1 is central to metastasis” or “False-positive rates are highly sample specific.” Use this landmark signpost to ensure that all the content on that slide is related exactly to the heading and only the heading. Think of the slide heading as the introductory or concluding sentence of a paragraph and the slide content the rest of the paragraph that supports the main point of the paragraph. An audience member should be able to follow along with you in the “paragraph” and come to the same conclusion sentence as your header at the end of the slide.

Rule 4: Include only essential points

While you are speaking, audience members’ eyes and minds will be wandering over your slide. If you have a comment, detail, or figure on a slide, have a plan to explicitly identify and talk about it. If you don’t think it’s important enough to spend time on, then don’t have it on your slide. This is especially important when faculty are present. I often tell students that thesis committee members are like cats: If you put a shiny bauble in front of them, they’ll go after it. Be sure to only put the shiny baubles on slides that you want them to focus on. Putting together a thesis meeting for only faculty is really an exercise in herding cats (if you have cats, you know this is no easy feat). Clear and concise slide design will go a long way in helping you corral those easily distracted faculty members.

Rule 5: Give credit, where credit is due

An exception to Rule 4 is to include proper citations or references to work on your slide. When adding citations, names of other researchers, or other types of credit, use a consistent style and method for adding this information to your slides. Your audience will then be able to easily partition this information from the other content. A common mistake people make is to think “I’ll add that reference later,” but I highly recommend you put the proper reference on the slide at the time you make it, before you forget where it came from. Finally, in certain kinds of presentations, credits can make it clear who did the work. For the faculty members heading labs, it is an effective way to connect your audience with the personnel in the lab who did the work, which is a great career booster for that person. For graduate students, it is an effective way to delineate your contribution to the work, especially in meetings where the goal is to establish your credentials for meeting the rigors of a PhD checkpoint.

Rule 6: Use graphics effectively

As a rule, you should almost never have slides that only contain text. Build your slides around good visualizations. It is a visual presentation after all, and as they say, a picture is worth a thousand words. However, on the flip side, don’t muddy the point of the slide by putting too many complex graphics on a single slide. A multipanel figure that you might include in a manuscript should often be broken into 1 panel per slide (see Rule 1 ). One way to ensure that you use the graphics effectively is to make a point to introduce the figure and its elements to the audience verbally, especially for data figures. For example, you might say the following: “This graph here shows the measured false-positive rate for an experiment and each point is a replicate of the experiment, the graph demonstrates …” If you have put too much on one slide to present in 1 minute (see Rule 2 ), then the complexity or number of the visualizations is too much for just one slide.

Rule 7: Design to avoid cognitive overload

The type of slide elements, the number of them, and how you present them all impact the ability for the audience to intake, organize, and remember the content. For example, a frequent mistake in slide design is to include full sentences, but reading and verbal processing use the same cognitive channels—therefore, an audience member can either read the slide, listen to you, or do some part of both (each poorly), as a result of cognitive overload [ 4 ]. The visual channel is separate, allowing images/videos to be processed with auditory information without cognitive overload [ 6 ] (Rule 6). As presentations are an exercise in listening, and not reading, do what you can to optimize the ability of the audience to listen. Use words sparingly as “guide posts” to you and the audience about major points of the slide. In fact, you can add short text fragments, redundant with the verbal component of the presentation, which has been shown to improve retention [ 7 ] (see Fig 1 for an example of redundant text that avoids cognitive overload). Be careful in the selection of a slide template to minimize accidentally adding elements that the audience must process, but are unimportant. David JP Phillips argues (and effectively demonstrates in his TEDx talk [ 5 ]) that the human brain can easily interpret 6 elements and more than that requires a 500% increase in human cognition load—so keep the total number of elements on the slide to 6 or less. Finally, in addition to the use of short text, white space, and the effective use of graphics/images, you can improve ease of cognitive processing further by considering color choices and font type and size. Here are a few suggestions for improving the experience for your audience, highlighting the importance of these elements for some specific groups:

  • Use high contrast colors and simple backgrounds with low to no color—for persons with dyslexia or visual impairment.
  • Use sans serif fonts and large font sizes (including figure legends), avoid italics, underlining (use bold font instead for emphasis), and all capital letters—for persons with dyslexia or visual impairment [ 8 ].
  • Use color combinations and palettes that can be understood by those with different forms of color blindness [ 9 ]. There are excellent tools available to identify colors to use and ways to simulate your presentation or figures as they might be seen by a person with color blindness (easily found by a web search).
  • In this increasing world of virtual presentation tools, consider practicing your talk with a closed captioning system capture your words. Use this to identify how to improve your speaking pace, volume, and annunciation to improve understanding by all members of your audience, but especially those with a hearing impairment.

Rule 8: Design the slide so that a distracted person gets the main takeaway

It is very difficult to stay focused on a presentation, especially if it is long or if it is part of a longer series of talks at a conference. Audience members may get distracted by an important email, or they may start dreaming of lunch. So, it’s important to look at your slide and ask “If they heard nothing I said, will they understand the key concept of this slide?” The other rules are set up to help with this, including clarity of the single point of the slide (Rule 1), titling it with a major conclusion (Rule 3), and the use of figures (Rule 6) and short text redundant to your verbal description (Rule 7). However, with each slide, step back and ask whether its main conclusion is conveyed, even if someone didn’t hear your accompanying dialog. Importantly, ask if the information on the slide is at the right level of abstraction. For example, do you have too many details about the experiment, which hides the conclusion of the experiment (i.e., breaking Rule 1)? If you are worried about not having enough details, keep a slide at the end of your slide deck (after your conclusions and acknowledgments) with the more detailed information that you can refer to during a question and answer period.

Rule 9: Iteratively improve slide design through practice

Well-designed slides that follow the first 8 rules are intended to help you deliver the message you intend and in the amount of time you intend to deliver it in. The best way to ensure that you nailed slide design for your presentation is to practice, typically a lot. The most important aspects of practicing a new presentation, with an eye toward slide design, are the following 2 key points: (1) practice to ensure that you hit, each time through, the most important points (for example, the text guide posts you left yourself and the title of the slide); and (2) practice to ensure that as you conclude the end of one slide, it leads directly to the next slide. Slide transitions, what you say as you end one slide and begin the next, are important to keeping the flow of the “story.” Practice is when I discover that the order of my presentation is poor or that I left myself too few guideposts to remember what was coming next. Additionally, during practice, the most frequent things I have to improve relate to Rule 2 (the slide takes too long to present, usually because I broke Rule 1, and I’m delivering too much information for one slide), Rule 4 (I have a nonessential detail on the slide), and Rule 5 (I forgot to give a key reference). The very best type of practice is in front of an audience (for example, your lab or peers), where, with fresh perspectives, they can help you identify places for improving slide content, design, and connections across the entirety of your talk.

Rule 10: Design to mitigate the impact of technical disasters

The real presentation almost never goes as we planned in our heads or during our practice. Maybe the speaker before you went over time and now you need to adjust. Maybe the computer the organizer is having you use won’t show your video. Maybe your internet is poor on the day you are giving a virtual presentation at a conference. Technical problems are routinely part of the practice of sharing your work through presentations. Hence, you can design your slides to limit the impact certain kinds of technical disasters create and also prepare alternate approaches. Here are just a few examples of the preparation you can do that will take you a long way toward avoiding a complete fiasco:

  • Save your presentation as a PDF—if the version of Keynote or PowerPoint on a host computer cause issues, you still have a functional copy that has a higher guarantee of compatibility.
  • In using videos, create a backup slide with screen shots of key results. For example, if I have a video of cell migration, I’ll be sure to have a copy of the start and end of the video, in case the video doesn’t play. Even if the video worked, you can pause on this backup slide and take the time to highlight the key results in words if someone could not see or understand the video.
  • Avoid animations, such as figures or text that flash/fly-in/etc. Surveys suggest that no one likes movement in presentations [ 3 , 4 ]. There is likely a cognitive underpinning to the almost universal distaste of pointless animations that relates to the idea proposed by Kosslyn and colleagues that animations are salient perceptual units that captures direct attention [ 4 ]. Although perceptual salience can be used to draw attention to and improve retention of specific points, if you use this approach for unnecessary/unimportant things (like animation of your bullet point text, fly-ins of figures, etc.), then you will distract your audience from the important content. Finally, animations cause additional processing burdens for people with visual impairments [ 10 ] and create opportunities for technical disasters if the software on the host system is not compatible with your planned animation.

Conclusions

These rules are just a start in creating more engaging presentations that increase audience retention of your material. However, there are wonderful resources on continuing on the journey of becoming an amazing public speaker, which includes understanding the psychology and neuroscience behind human perception and learning. For example, as highlighted in Rule 7, David JP Phillips has a wonderful TEDx talk on the subject [ 5 ], and “PowerPoint presentation flaws and failures: A psychological analysis,” by Kosslyn and colleagues is deeply detailed about a number of aspects of human cognition and presentation style [ 4 ]. There are many books on the topic, including the popular “Presentation Zen” by Garr Reynolds [ 11 ]. Finally, although briefly touched on here, the visualization of data is an entire topic of its own that is worth perfecting for both written and oral presentations of work, with fantastic resources like Edward Tufte’s “The Visual Display of Quantitative Information” [ 12 ] or the article “Visualization of Biomedical Data” by O’Donoghue and colleagues [ 13 ].

Acknowledgments

I would like to thank the countless presenters, colleagues, students, and mentors from which I have learned a great deal from on effective presentations. Also, a thank you to the wonderful resources published by organizations on how to increase inclusivity. A special thanks to Dr. Jason Papin and Dr. Michael Guertin on early feedback of this editorial.

Funding Statement

The author received no specific funding for this work.

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Structure of a presentation

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A presentation:

  • has an introduction, body and conclusion
  • may include visual aids
  • is usually followed by questions and discussions
  • may also have a handout for the audience to take away.

Introduction

  • The introduction should orient the audience to your subject and purpose. To capture interest and set up rapport, it should tell the audience what to expect.
  • Be sure to carefully define the central point (or thesis) that is the basis of your talk and ensure that your supporting argument or information relates closely to it.
  • If you are not proceeding from an already written assignment, it might help to think of your introduction as funnel-shaped, with the content coming out of the funnel. See the diagram below:

alt text

Useful language for presentations

Staging the introduction.

The body of the presentation should meet the promises of purpose and information made in the introduction.

The structure of the presentation is crucial.

Whether you organise:

  • chronologically,
  • by priority,

the body of your talk must proceed logically. The main points should be brought out one by one, with concise and relevant supportive evidence, statistics or examples and verbal ‘signposting’ of your progress through your argument or report.

You could present each important idea or point several times in different ways, because a listening audience needs several opportunities to fully absorb meaning.

You need to state clearly the links between your ideas and always signal when the next point is coming. If you think something is particularly important, say so and why.

If you don’t have a written assignment, it will help to think of your main points as paragraph topic sentences, each of which needs to be followed by supporting sentences and a conclusion.

Staging the body of your talk

Group presentations.

It may be that you are making a presentation as part of a group. Essentially the same information applies to group presentations as individual ones. It is important that they are logical and well structured as well as professional and meaningful. It is also doubly important that the group rehearse and practise together several times to ensure the presentation runs smoothly on the day.

Handing over to a co-presenter

Your talk may involve several speakers in your group presentation. You need to manage the handover smoothly and professionally, for example:

“I would like to conclude my discussion/report at this point and hand over to my partner/colleague XYZ who will examine/discuss/report the area/topic/perspective of…”

Similar to a written assignment, the conclusion again states your main points and what has been learned or shown but you also may raise implications inherent in the findings and offer creative recommendations.

Staging the conclusion

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what are presentation requirements

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PowerPoint Tips  - Simple Rules for Better PowerPoint Presentations

Powerpoint tips  -, simple rules for better powerpoint presentations, powerpoint tips simple rules for better powerpoint presentations.

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PowerPoint Tips: Simple Rules for Better PowerPoint Presentations

Lesson 17: simple rules for better powerpoint presentations.

/en/powerpoint-tips/embed-excel-charts-in-a-slide/content/

Simple rules for better PowerPoint presentations

Have you ever given a PowerPoint presentation and noticed that something about it just seemed a little … off? If you’re unfamiliar with basic PowerPoint design principles, it can be difficult to create a slide show that presents your information in the best light.

Poorly designed presentations can leave an audience feeling confused, bored, and even irritated. Review these tips to make your next presentation more engaging.

Don't read your presentation straight from the slides

If your audience can both read and hear, it’s a waste of time for you to simply read your slides aloud. Your audience will zone out and stop listening to what you’re saying, which means they won’t hear any extra information you include.

Instead of typing out your entire presentation, include only main ideas, keywords, and talking points in your slide show text. Engage your audience by sharing the details out loud.

Follow the 5/5/5 rule

To keep your audience from feeling overwhelmed, you should keep the text on each slide short and to the point. Some experts suggest using the 5/5/5 rule : no more than five words per line of text, five lines of text per slide, or five text-heavy slides in a row.

slide with too much text versus a slide with just enough text

Don't forget your audience

Who will be watching your presentation? The same goofy effects and funny clip art that would entertain a classroom full of middle-school students might make you look unprofessional in front of business colleagues and clients.

Humor can lighten up a presentation, but if you use it inappropriately your audience might think you don’t know what you’re doing. Know your audience, and tailor your presentation to their tastes and expectations.

Choose readable colors and fonts

Your text should be easy to read and pleasant to look at. Large, simple fonts and theme colors are always your best bet. The best fonts and colors can vary depending on your presentation setting. Presenting in a large room? Make your text larger than usual so people in the back can read it. Presenting with the lights on? Dark text on a light background is your best bet for visibility.

Screenshot of Microsoft PowerPoint

Don't overload your presentation with animations

As anyone who’s sat through a presentation while every letter of every paragraph zoomed across the screen can tell you, being inundated with complicated animations and exciting slide transitions can become irritating.

Before including effects like this in your presentation, ask yourself: Would this moment in the presentation be equally strong without an added effect? Does it unnecessarily delay information? If the answer to either question is yes—or even maybe—leave out the effect.

Use animations sparingly to enhance your presentation

Don’t take the last tip to mean you should avoid animations and other effects entirely. When used sparingly, subtle effects and animations can add to your presentation. For example, having bullet points appear as you address them rather than before can help keep your audience’s attention.

Keep these tips in mind the next time you create a presentation—your audience will thank you. For more detailed information on creating a PowerPoint presentation, visit our Office tutorials .

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  • Effective Presentation Skills Tutorial
  • Preparing for the Presentation

what are presentation requirements

Preparing the Presentation

Before developing a presentation on a given topic, know the requirements, purpose and audience of the presentation and then prepare an outline of the presentation.

Know the Requirements

Knowing the requirements of a presentation involves finding the answers for several relevant questions:

How much time will you have to deliver the presentation?

This dictates how much you have to prepare and how detailed it should be. The number of slides necessary for a 5-minute class presentation may differ considerably from what is necessary for a 30-minute project presentation.

Who and how many will be in the audience?

This impacts the formality of the presentation and its context, as well as the attire you may have to wear.

A thesis or dissertation presentation for a committee of faculty, or a project presentation for client at a company, may have a small audience and require formality in your delivery and attire (as appropriate for your discipline).

The context could involve evaluation of your presentation for a course grade or obtaining a project for your company.

Knowing the audience is also important for accommodating people with different abilities.

Where will you deliver the presentation?

This impacts the design of presentation materials, your delivery (whether you need a microphone or not) and the possibility to interact with the audience.

A small conference room (as opposed to a large classroom or an auditorium) may require developing different type of presentation materials.

A small conference room or classroom may allow you to interact easily with the audience, while a large auditorium where you deliver the presentation from the stage may not allow you that flexibility.

What type of technologies will be available to deliver the presentation?

This impacts the selection of technologies to match what will be available at the presentation location.

The delivery technologies can include presentation software and data projector, document camera, flip charts, microphone, web browsers, etc.

If you design your presentation using an online presentation tool, and plan to deliver the presentation using the same, it is critical to make sure that online presentation tool will be available at the delivery location, or you can bring your own.

Will you deliver the presentation alone or as part of a panel or a team?

This impacts what you prepare and how you will have to deliver it.

If you have to deliver the presentation by yourself, you will have considerable flexibility on how you can design and deliver your presentation.

If you have to present as part of a panel or a team, then you may have to coordinate with other presenters, to align your portion appropriately with theirs and not duplicate material.

Do you have to prepare handouts of your presentation to distribute to the audience?

This impacts the design of your presentation materials and the cost of making copies of the presentation.

Some presentation materials may come across well on a large screen but not on paper.

Distributing copies of your presentation will require you to know in advance how many copies to make, and any to make in large fonts for those with visual impairments.

What alternatives do you have if there are unexpected changes at the last minute to any of the previous items?

This helps you to develop Plan B solutions in case there are unexpected changes.

Planning simple alternatives to handle unavailability of particular delivery technologies in the presentation location or change in presentation duration can reduce stress and help you deliver your presentation effectively.

Saving presentation materials in different formats and media will help to adapt to any unexpected changes at the last minute.

Know the Purpose

Learn about the purpose of your presentation from your course instructor or the organizer of your presentation.

The purpose of a presentation can be (and are not limited) to:

  • Inform   an audience, as in a formal thesis or project presentation
  • Persuade   an audience, as in selling a proposal for service to a client or convincing an interviewer
  • Entertain   an audience, as in presenting at a reception
  • Speak   on a special occasion, such as honoring a colleague
  • Educate   an audience, as in teaching or training a group of people

Informative Presentation

This video clip is an example of the presenter informing the audience .

Persuasive Presentation

This video clip is an example of a presenter attempting to persuade the audience .

Entertaining Presentation

This video clip is an example of the presenter attempting to entertain .

Honoring Presentation

This video clip is an example of the presenter speaking to the audience on a special occasion .

Knowing the purpose of the presentation will help you design, develop, and deliver the presentation for the intended purpose.

For example, a brief technical presentation for informing an audience may not leave time for very many interactions with the audience, including questions and answers (Q&A) at the end.

However, a technical presentation as part of a thesis or dissertation defense will involve considerable Q&A by the faculty committee and the audience.

Presenting for the purpose of educating or training an audience may require considerable interaction and Q&A during the presentations.

Presenting for the purpose of entertaining an audience may not be very formal, whereas honoring someone may be formal, and both may not involve Q&A at the end.

Knowing the purpose of the presentation can also help in arranging the room layout and audience seating (if that flexibility is available), so you can interact easily with the audience appropriately.

Know the Audience

It is important to know your audience demographics before you prepare your presentation. Knowing who they are (faculty, students, etc.), their familiarity with the topic, and their role (gain information, evaluate your learning, etc.) in attending your presentation, will help you organize your thoughts appropriately.

Presentation Level Appropriate

This video clip is an example of a presentation that is appropriate for a non-expert audience .

Presentation Level Inappropriate

This video clip is an example of a presentation that is too technical for a non-expert audience .

Presenting a topic to a specific audience requires careful preparation so the presentation will make sense to them and fulfill their needs. Some audience demographics include age, gender, faculty or students and educational background. Presenting to a group of your peers will require you to present the topic with authority, but on their level of understanding and with the ability to motivate them to ask questions. Presenting to a faculty audience will also require you to present the topic with authority, but you may need to prepare for more substantial questions and remarks.

Prepare an Outline

Once you know the requirements and the purpose of the presentation, the next step is to prepare an outline. Preparing an outline will give you a roadmap or a sense of direction for developing the presentation for the required purpose.

Before you develop an outline, ask yourself what you would want your audience to know in the time you have to present it. The outline should consist of the major headings or topics of your presentation.

The outline should have a beginning, middle and an end so that the audience can follow your ideas logically from the beginning to the end. You can then elaborate each major topic or heading into appropriate points.

The type of outline and the list of headings or topics may depend on the nature of the discipline and the purpose of a presentation.

For example, the outline of a technical presentation for informing an audience can consist of headings such as:

  • Problem statement
  • Objectives and scope
  • Literature review
  • Methodology
  • Experimentation
  • Conclusions

Similarly, the outline of XYZ corporation's (your employer) proposal presentation to a client ABC Co. for obtaining a project can consist of headings such as:

  • Welcome and introductions
  • Needs and trends
  • XYZ corporation
  • XYZ’s products and services
  • Major clients of XYZ
  • How XYZ can serve the needs of ABC
  • Possible opportunities
  • Contact information
  • Questions and answers

An example of an outline for a non-technical presentation in the humanities or other disciplines could include the following:

  • Purpose, thesis, preview
  • First (second, third) point(s), supporting evidence of thesis
  • Possible objections analyzed and or refuted
  • Source of information
  • Transition to conclusion
  • Restate thesis
  • Statement of possible actions, next steps
  • Memory and attention-reinforcing strategies (quote, anecdote, etc.)
  • Discussion of limitations, missing elements
  • Closing or summary statement

Depending on the allotted duration of your presentation, you can then plan on how much time to spend on each topic, and develop the presentation materials accordingly.

The outline will depend on the content of your presentation and the outline need not dictate how the presentation will be delivered.

One can develop an outline or a framework for a presentation but organize the content in a non-sequential manner for delivery. This is especially suited for when the outline is in the form of a pictorial framework where each part can be presented non-sequentially.

Once you have developed the outline of your presentation, the next step is to organize the content.

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  • Organizing the Presentation
  • Designing Effective Presentation Materials
  • Rehearsing the Presentation
  • Delivering the Presentation
  • Handling Questions and Answers
  • Presentation Skills Quiz
  • Presentation Preparation Checklist
  • Common Reasons for Ineffective Presentations

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The Presentation Planning Checklist

By the Mind Tools Content Team

what are presentation requirements

This presentation planning checklist* will help you to deliver successful presentations.

Presentation

  • Does your introduction grab participants' attention and explain your objectives?
  • Do you follow this by clearly defining the points of the presentation?
  • Are these main points in logical sequence?
  • Do these flow well?
  • Do the main points need support from visual aids?
  • Does your closing summarize the presentation clearly and concisely?
  • Is the conclusion strong?
  • Have your tied the conclusion to the introduction?
  • Are you knowledgeable about the topic covered in your presentation?
  • Do you have your notes in order?
  • Where and how will you present (indoors, outdoors, standing, sitting, etc.)?
  • Have you visited the presentation site?
  • Have you checked your visual aids to ensure they are working and you know how to use them?

Many people are nervous about speaking in public. If this applies to you, see our article, Managing Presentation Nerves .

  • Make sure you are dressed and groomed appropriately and in keeping with the audience's expectations.
  • Practice your speech standing (or sitting, if applicable), paying close attention to your body language, even your posture, both of which will be assessed by the audience.

Visual Aids

  • Are the visual aids easy to read and easy to understand?
  • Are they tied into the points you are trying to communicate?
  • Can they be easily seen from all areas of the room?

* Adapted, in part, from Rouse/Rouse, Business Communications: A Cultural and Strategic Approach (ISBN: 9781861525444). © 2002 Cengage Learning

Rouse, M.J. and Rouse, S. (2002). ' Business Communications: A Cultural and Strategic Approach ,' London: Thomson Learning. p173-174.

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How to Structure your Presentation, with Examples

August 3, 2018 - Dom Barnard

For many people the thought of delivering a presentation is a daunting task and brings about a  great deal of nerves . However, if you take some time to understand how effective presentations are structured and then apply this structure to your own presentation, you’ll appear much more confident and relaxed.

Here is our complete guide for structuring your presentation, with examples at the end of the article to demonstrate these points.

Why is structuring a presentation so important?

If you’ve ever sat through a great presentation, you’ll have left feeling either inspired or informed on a given topic. This isn’t because the speaker was the most knowledgeable or motivating person in the world. Instead, it’s because they know how to structure presentations – they have crafted their message in a logical and simple way that has allowed the audience can keep up with them and take away key messages.

Research has supported this, with studies showing that audiences retain structured information  40% more accurately  than unstructured information.

In fact, not only is structuring a presentation important for the benefit of the audience’s understanding, it’s also important for you as the speaker. A good structure helps you remain calm, stay on topic, and avoid any awkward silences.

What will affect your presentation structure?

Generally speaking, there is a natural flow that any decent presentation will follow which we will go into shortly. However, you should be aware that all presentation structures will be different in their own unique way and this will be due to a number of factors, including:

  • Whether you need to deliver any demonstrations
  • How  knowledgeable the audience  already is on the given subject
  • How much interaction you want from the audience
  • Any time constraints there are for your talk
  • What setting you are in
  • Your ability to use any kinds of visual assistance

Before choosing the presentation’s structure answer these questions first:

  • What is your presentation’s aim?
  • Who are the audience?
  • What are the main points your audience should remember afterwards?

When reading the points below, think critically about what things may cause your presentation structure to be slightly different. You can add in certain elements and add more focus to certain moments if that works better for your speech.

Good presentation structure is important for a presentation

What is the typical presentation structure?

This is the usual flow of a presentation, which covers all the vital sections and is a good starting point for yours. It allows your audience to easily follow along and sets out a solid structure you can add your content to.

1. Greet the audience and introduce yourself

Before you start delivering your talk, introduce yourself to the audience and clarify who you are and your relevant expertise. This does not need to be long or incredibly detailed, but will help build an immediate relationship between you and the audience. It gives you the chance to briefly clarify your expertise and why you are worth listening to. This will help establish your ethos so the audience will trust you more and think you’re credible.

Read our tips on  How to Start a Presentation Effectively

2. Introduction

In the introduction you need to explain the subject and purpose of your presentation whilst gaining the audience’s interest and confidence. It’s sometimes helpful to think of your introduction as funnel-shaped to help filter down your topic:

  • Introduce your general topic
  • Explain your topic area
  • State the issues/challenges in this area you will be exploring
  • State your presentation’s purpose – this is the basis of your presentation so ensure that you provide a statement explaining how the topic will be treated, for example, “I will argue that…” or maybe you will “compare”, “analyse”, “evaluate”, “describe” etc.
  • Provide a statement of what you’re hoping the outcome of the presentation will be, for example, “I’m hoping this will be provide you with…”
  • Show a preview of the organisation of your presentation

In this section also explain:

  • The length of the talk.
  • Signal whether you want audience interaction – some presenters prefer the audience to ask questions throughout whereas others allocate a specific section for this.
  • If it applies, inform the audience whether to take notes or whether you will be providing handouts.

The way you structure your introduction can depend on the amount of time you have been given to present: a  sales pitch  may consist of a quick presentation so you may begin with your conclusion and then provide the evidence. Conversely, a speaker presenting their idea for change in the world would be better suited to start with the evidence and then conclude what this means for the audience.

Keep in mind that the main aim of the introduction is to grab the audience’s attention and connect with them.

3. The main body of your talk

The main body of your talk needs to meet the promises you made in the introduction. Depending on the nature of your presentation, clearly segment the different topics you will be discussing, and then work your way through them one at a time – it’s important for everything to be organised logically for the audience to fully understand. There are many different ways to organise your main points, such as, by priority, theme, chronologically etc.

  • Main points should be addressed one by one with supporting evidence and examples.
  • Before moving on to the next point you should provide a mini-summary.
  • Links should be clearly stated between ideas and you must make it clear when you’re moving onto the next point.
  • Allow time for people to take relevant notes and stick to the topics you have prepared beforehand rather than straying too far off topic.

When planning your presentation write a list of main points you want to make and ask yourself “What I am telling the audience? What should they understand from this?” refining your answers this way will help you produce clear messages.

4. Conclusion

In presentations the conclusion is frequently underdeveloped and lacks purpose which is a shame as it’s the best place to reinforce your messages. Typically, your presentation has a specific goal – that could be to convert a number of the audience members into customers, lead to a certain number of enquiries to make people knowledgeable on specific key points, or to motivate them towards a shared goal.

Regardless of what that goal is, be sure to summarise your main points and their implications. This clarifies the overall purpose of your talk and reinforces your reason for being there.

Follow these steps:

  • Signal that it’s nearly the end of your presentation, for example, “As we wrap up/as we wind down the talk…”
  • Restate the topic and purpose of your presentation – “In this speech I wanted to compare…”
  • Summarise the main points, including their implications and conclusions
  • Indicate what is next/a call to action/a thought-provoking takeaway
  • Move on to the last section

5. Thank the audience and invite questions

Conclude your talk by thanking the audience for their time and invite them to  ask any questions  they may have. As mentioned earlier, personal circumstances will affect the structure of your presentation.

Many presenters prefer to make the Q&A session the key part of their talk and try to speed through the main body of the presentation. This is totally fine, but it is still best to focus on delivering some sort of initial presentation to set the tone and topics for discussion in the Q&A.

Questions being asked after a presentation

Other common presentation structures

The above was a description of a basic presentation, here are some more specific presentation layouts:

Demonstration

Use the demonstration structure when you have something useful to show. This is usually used when you want to show how a product works. Steve Jobs frequently used this technique in his presentations.

  • Explain why the product is valuable.
  • Describe why the product is necessary.
  • Explain what problems it can solve for the audience.
  • Demonstrate the product  to support what you’ve been saying.
  • Make suggestions of other things it can do to make the audience curious.

Problem-solution

This structure is particularly useful in persuading the audience.

  • Briefly frame the issue.
  • Go into the issue in detail showing why it ‘s such a problem. Use logos and pathos for this – the logical and emotional appeals.
  • Provide the solution and explain why this would also help the audience.
  • Call to action – something you want the audience to do which is straightforward and pertinent to the solution.

Storytelling

As well as incorporating  stories in your presentation , you can organise your whole presentation as a story. There are lots of different type of story structures you can use – a popular choice is the monomyth – the hero’s journey. In a monomyth, a hero goes on a difficult journey or takes on a challenge – they move from the familiar into the unknown. After facing obstacles and ultimately succeeding the hero returns home, transformed and with newfound wisdom.

Storytelling for Business Success  webinar , where well-know storyteller Javier Bernad shares strategies for crafting compelling narratives.

Another popular choice for using a story to structure your presentation is in media ras (in the middle of thing). In this type of story you launch right into the action by providing a snippet/teaser of what’s happening and then you start explaining the events that led to that event. This is engaging because you’re starting your story at the most exciting part which will make the audience curious – they’ll want to know how you got there.

  • Great storytelling: Examples from Alibaba Founder, Jack Ma

Remaining method

The remaining method structure is good for situations where you’re presenting your perspective on a controversial topic which has split people’s opinions.

  • Go into the issue in detail showing why it’s such a problem – use logos and pathos.
  • Rebut your opponents’ solutions  – explain why their solutions could be useful because the audience will see this as fair and will therefore think you’re trustworthy, and then explain why you think these solutions are not valid.
  • After you’ve presented all the alternatives provide your solution, the remaining solution. This is very persuasive because it looks like the winning idea, especially with the audience believing that you’re fair and trustworthy.

Transitions

When delivering presentations it’s important for your words and ideas to flow so your audience can understand how everything links together and why it’s all relevant. This can be done  using speech transitions  which are words and phrases that allow you to smoothly move from one point to another so that your speech flows and your presentation is unified.

Transitions can be one word, a phrase or a full sentence – there are many different forms, here are some examples:

Moving from the introduction to the first point

Signify to the audience that you will now begin discussing the first main point:

  • Now that you’re aware of the overview, let’s begin with…
  • First, let’s begin with…
  • I will first cover…
  • My first point covers…
  • To get started, let’s look at…

Shifting between similar points

Move from one point to a similar one:

  • In the same way…
  • Likewise…
  • Equally…
  • This is similar to…
  • Similarly…

Internal summaries

Internal summarising consists of summarising before moving on to the next point. You must inform the audience:

  • What part of the presentation you covered – “In the first part of this speech we’ve covered…”
  • What the key points were – “Precisely how…”
  • How this links in with the overall presentation – “So that’s the context…”
  • What you’re moving on to – “Now I’d like to move on to the second part of presentation which looks at…”

Physical movement

You can move your body and your standing location when you transition to another point. The audience find it easier to follow your presentation and movement will increase their interest.

A common technique for incorporating movement into your presentation is to:

  • Start your introduction by standing in the centre of the stage.
  • For your first point you stand on the left side of the stage.
  • You discuss your second point from the centre again.
  • You stand on the right side of the stage for your third point.
  • The conclusion occurs in the centre.

Key slides for your presentation

Slides are a useful tool for most presentations: they can greatly assist in the delivery of your message and help the audience follow along with what you are saying. Key slides include:

  • An intro slide outlining your ideas
  • A  summary slide  with core points to remember
  • High quality image slides to supplement what you are saying

There are some presenters who choose not to use slides at all, though this is more of a rarity. Slides can be a powerful tool if used properly, but the problem is that many fail to do just that. Here are some golden rules to follow when using slides in a presentation:

  • Don’t over fill them  – your slides are there to assist your speech, rather than be the focal point. They should have as little information as possible, to avoid distracting people from your talk.
  • A picture says a thousand words  – instead of filling a slide with text, instead, focus on one or two images or diagrams to help support and explain the point you are discussing at that time.
  • Make them readable  – depending on the size of your audience, some may not be able to see small text or images, so make everything large enough to fill the space.
  • Don’t rush through slides  – give the audience enough time to digest each slide.

Guy Kawasaki, an entrepreneur and author, suggests that slideshows should follow a  10-20-30 rule :

  • There should be a maximum of 10 slides – people rarely remember more than one concept afterwards so there’s no point overwhelming them with unnecessary information.
  • The presentation should last no longer than 20 minutes as this will leave time for questions and discussion.
  • The font size should be a minimum of 30pt because the audience reads faster than you talk so less information on the slides means that there is less chance of the audience being distracted.

Here are some additional resources for slide design:

  • 7 design tips for effective, beautiful PowerPoint presentations
  • 11 design tips for beautiful presentations
  • 10 tips on how to make slides that communicate your idea

Group Presentations

Group presentations are structured in the same way as presentations with one speaker but usually require more rehearsal and practices.  Clean transitioning between speakers  is very important in producing a presentation that flows well. One way of doing this consists of:

  • Briefly recap on what you covered in your section: “So that was a brief introduction on what health anxiety is and how it can affect somebody”
  • Introduce the next speaker in the team and explain what they will discuss: “Now Elnaz will talk about the prevalence of health anxiety.”
  • Then end by looking at the next speaker, gesturing towards them and saying their name: “Elnaz”.
  • The next speaker should acknowledge this with a quick: “Thank you Joe.”

From this example you can see how the different sections of the presentations link which makes it easier for the audience to follow and remain engaged.

Example of great presentation structure and delivery

Having examples of great presentations will help inspire your own structures, here are a few such examples, each unique and inspiring in their own way.

How Google Works – by Eric Schmidt

This presentation by ex-Google CEO  Eric Schmidt  demonstrates some of the most important lessons he and his team have learnt with regards to working with some of the most talented individuals they hired. The simplistic yet cohesive style of all of the slides is something to be appreciated. They are relatively straightforward, yet add power and clarity to the narrative of the presentation.

Start with why – by Simon Sinek

Since being released in 2009, this presentation has been viewed almost four million times all around the world. The message itself is very powerful, however, it’s not an idea that hasn’t been heard before. What makes this presentation so powerful is the simple message he is getting across, and the straightforward and understandable manner in which he delivers it. Also note that he doesn’t use any slides, just a whiteboard where he creates a simple diagram of his opinion.

The Wisdom of a Third Grade Dropout – by Rick Rigsby

Here’s an example of a presentation given by a relatively unknown individual looking to inspire the next generation of graduates. Rick’s presentation is unique in many ways compared to the two above. Notably, he uses no visual prompts and includes a great deal of humour.

However, what is similar is the structure he uses. He first introduces his message that the wisest man he knew was a third-grade dropout. He then proceeds to deliver his main body of argument, and in the end, concludes with his message. This powerful speech keeps the viewer engaged throughout, through a mixture of heart-warming sentiment, powerful life advice and engaging humour.

As you can see from the examples above, and as it has been expressed throughout, a great presentation structure means analysing the core message of your presentation. Decide on a key message you want to impart the audience with, and then craft an engaging way of delivering it.

By preparing a solid structure, and  practising your talk  beforehand, you can walk into the presentation with confidence and deliver a meaningful message to an interested audience.

It’s important for a presentation to be well-structured so it can have the most impact on your audience. An unstructured presentation can be difficult to follow and even frustrating to listen to. The heart of your speech are your main points supported by evidence and your transitions should assist the movement between points and clarify how everything is linked.

Research suggests that the audience remember the first and last things you say so your introduction and conclusion are vital for reinforcing your points. Essentially, ensure you spend the time structuring your presentation and addressing all of the sections.

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What is a Presentation?

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Presentation Skills:

  • A - Z List of Presentation Skills
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  • Organising the Material
  • Writing Your Presentation
  • Deciding the Presentation Method
  • Managing your Presentation Notes
  • Working with Visual Aids
  • Presenting Data
  • Managing the Event
  • Coping with Presentation Nerves
  • Dealing with Questions
  • How to Build Presentations Like a Consultant
  • 7 Qualities of Good Speakers That Can Help You Be More Successful
  • Self-Presentation in Presentations
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  • Elsewhere on Skills You Need:
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The formal presentation of information is divided into two broad categories: Presentation Skills and Personal Presentation .

These two aspects are interwoven and can be described as the preparation, presentation and practice of verbal and non-verbal communication. 

This article describes what a presentation is and defines some of the key terms associated with presentation skills.

Many people feel terrified when asked to make their first public talk.  Some of these initial fears can be reduced by good preparation that also lays the groundwork for making an effective presentation.

A Presentation Is...

A presentation is a means of communication that can be adapted to various speaking situations, such as talking to a group, addressing a meeting or briefing a team.

A presentation can also be used as a broad term that encompasses other ‘speaking engagements’ such as making a speech at a wedding, or getting a point across in a video conference.

To be effective, step-by-step preparation and the method and means of presenting the information should be carefully considered. 

A presentation requires you to get a message across to the listeners and will often contain a ' persuasive ' element. It may, for example, be a talk about the positive work of your organisation, what you could offer an employer, or why you should receive additional funding for a project.

The Key Elements of a Presentation

Making a presentation is a way of communicating your thoughts and ideas to an audience and many of our articles on communication are also relevant here, see: What is Communication? for more.

Consider the following key components of a presentation:

Ask yourself the following questions to develop a full understanding of the context of the presentation.

When and where will you deliver your presentation?

There is a world of difference between a small room with natural light and an informal setting, and a huge lecture room, lit with stage lights. The two require quite different presentations, and different techniques.

Will it be in a setting you are familiar with, or somewhere new?

If somewhere new, it would be worth trying to visit it in advance, or at least arriving early, to familiarise yourself with the room.

Will the presentation be within a formal or less formal setting?

A work setting will, more or less by definition, be more formal, but there are also various degrees of formality within that.

Will the presentation be to a small group or a large crowd?

Are you already familiar with the audience?

With a new audience, you will have to build rapport quickly and effectively, to get them on your side.

What equipment and technology will be available to you, and what will you be expected to use?

In particular, you will need to ask about microphones and whether you will be expected to stand in one place, or move around.

What is the audience expecting to learn from you and your presentation?

Check how you will be ‘billed’ to give you clues as to what information needs to be included in your presentation.

All these aspects will change the presentation. For more on this, see our page on Deciding the Presentation Method .

The role of the presenter is to communicate with the audience and control the presentation.

Remember, though, that this may also include handing over the control to your audience, especially if you want some kind of interaction.

You may wish to have a look at our page on Facilitation Skills for more.

The audience receives the presenter’s message(s).

However, this reception will be filtered through and affected by such things as the listener’s own experience, knowledge and personal sense of values.

See our page: Barriers to Effective Communication to learn why communication can fail.

The message or messages are delivered by the presenter to the audience.

The message is delivered not just by the spoken word ( verbal communication ) but can be augmented by techniques such as voice projection, body language, gestures, eye contact ( non-verbal communication ), and visual aids.

The message will also be affected by the audience’s expectations. For example, if you have been billed as speaking on one particular topic, and you choose to speak on another, the audience is unlikely to take your message on board even if you present very well . They will judge your presentation a failure, because you have not met their expectations.

The audience’s reaction and therefore the success of the presentation will largely depend upon whether you, as presenter, effectively communicated your message, and whether it met their expectations.

As a presenter, you don’t control the audience’s expectations. What you can do is find out what they have been told about you by the conference organisers, and what they are expecting to hear. Only if you know that can you be confident of delivering something that will meet expectations.

See our page: Effective Speaking for more information.

How will the presentation be delivered?

Presentations are usually delivered direct to an audience.  However, there may be occasions where they are delivered from a distance over the Internet using video conferencing systems, such as Skype.

It is also important to remember that if your talk is recorded and posted on the internet, then people may be able to access it for several years. This will mean that your contemporaneous references should be kept to a minimum.

Impediments

Many factors can influence the effectiveness of how your message is communicated to the audience.

For example background noise or other distractions, an overly warm or cool room, or the time of day and state of audience alertness can all influence your audience’s level of concentration.

As presenter, you have to be prepared to cope with any such problems and try to keep your audience focussed on your message.   

Our page: Barriers to Communication explains these factors in more depth.

Continue to read through our Presentation Skills articles for an overview of how to prepare and structure a presentation, and how to manage notes and/or illustrations at any speaking event.

Continue to: Preparing for a Presentation Deciding the Presentation Method

See also: Writing Your Presentation | Working with Visual Aids Coping with Presentation Nerves | Dealing with Questions Learn Better Presentation Skills with TED Talks

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Extended Essay: Presentation Requirements

  • Extended Essay- The Basics
  • Step 1. Choose a Subject
  • Step 2. Educate yourself!
  • Using Brainstorming and Mind Maps
  • Identify Keywords
  • Do Background Reading
  • Define Your Topic
  • Conduct Research in a Specific Discipline
  • Step 5. Draft a Research Question
  • Step 6. Create a Timeline
  • Find Articles
  • Find Primary Sources
  • Get Help from Experts
  • Search Engines, Repositories, & Directories
  • Databases and Websites by Subject Area
  • Create an Annotated Bibliography
  • Advice (and Warnings) from the IB
  • Chicago Citation Syle
  • MLA Works Cited & In-Text Citations
  • Step 9. Set Deadlines for Yourself
  • Step 10. Plan a structure for your essay
  • Evaluate & Select: the CRAAP Test
  • Conducting Secondary Research
  • Conducting Primary Research
  • Formal vs. Informal Writing
  • Presentation Requirements
  • Evaluating Your Work

How to Format the Extended Essay

Dollar sign in snake font - Britannica ImageQuest

Font and spacing

Use a readable 12-point font and double spacing. You will be helping your examiners read and assess your essay on-screen.

Referencing and citations

The IB does not specify what referencing/citation format you should use. Whichever system you choose, make sure that you follow it consistently. Check, too, that it meets the minimum requirements for acknowledging both written and electronic sources expected by the IB. See the IB publication:

what are presentation requirements

What Should Be on the Title Page?

St. Louis, Missouri; November, 1948, President Harry Truman - Britannica ImageQuest

The title page should include only the following information:

  • the title of the essay (optional)
  • the research question (required)
  • the word count (required)
  • if it is a language essay it should also state which category it falls into
  • if it is a world studies essay  it should also state the theme and the two subjects utilized

​ Distinguishing Between the Title and the Research Question

Your extended essay can have a title  and  a research question.  The research question is required on the cover page, while the title is optional. 

  • The  title  is a clear, focused summative statement of the research which gives the reader an indication of the research topic. It should  not  be phrased as a research question.
  • The  research question  indicates the specific topic of research and must be phrased as a question.

What should NOT be on the  first page/title page of your EE?

The title page should NOT include only the following information:

  • the  school's name
  • your  IB candidate number
  • any identifying pieces of information (on the title page, or any other section of the essay, such as headers or footers)

Question mark - Britannica ImageQuest

When work is uploaded, the IB tags each document with the student's digital profiles so personal details like your name, your school, and your candidate number are not required.   Very important:  to make sure that IB assessment is unbiased and fair, IB does not give your name to examiners, so there should be nothing that could identify you in the essay itself.

Which Would Be Better to Send to IB?

Compare and contrast:  which would be better to send to IB?

Submitting a paper in the recommended format will set a serious tone. Take a look at the example text below formatted in two drastically different fonts. Notice the difference in tone and mood—which format would be easier for the examiner to read, assess and comment on?

 Example A (12 point, Arial, double-spaced)

Example B (9 point, Comic Sans, single-spaced)

Presentation Requirements of the EE

International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme

Required Elements of the Extended Essay

what are presentation requirements

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  • Last Updated: Feb 2, 2024 1:39 PM
  • URL: https://libguides.westsoundacademy.org/ee

Presentation Requirements

  • Introduce a new networking topic to the other members of the class
  • Practice learning and assimilating new topics on your own
  • Practice your presentation and public speaking skills
  • Network Security
  • Wireless Networking
  • Distributed Hash Tables
  • Measurement Studies
  • CDNs and Proxies
  • Network Simulation Tools
  • Net Neutrality
  • Sensor Networks
  • Social Networking

Presentation Guidelines

  • Example 1: 10 minute overview of area and ideas presented in paper 1 and paper 2, 8 minute overview of the goals and design of the work presented in paper 1, 8 minute discussion of the results presented in paper 1, 4 minute conclusion.
  • Example 2: 7 minute overview of area and ideas presented in paper 1 and paper 2, 10 minute discussion of the goals and results of paper 1, 10 minute discussion of the goals and results of paper2, 3 minute conclusion and comparison of the two papers.
  • Example 3: 10 minute overview of area, 15 minute discussion of the implementation of a particular technology, 5 minute conclusion.

Requirements

  • You must receive approval for your topic by April 16.
  • You must provide a list of sources (papers, books, URLs) by April 23.
  • You must attend a one-on-one meeting with the instructor by April 25. During the meeting we will discuss your sources and the outline of your presentation. Of course, you are more than welcome to schedule more than one such meeting and you are also welcome to schedule a practice talk with the instructor.

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what are presentation requirements

Conference Covid Policy

Registration for in-person attendance, workshops, and field trips opening soon. All members will be notified via email.

Registration for in-person attendance, workshops, and field trips scheduled for June 10, 2022.

  • My Registration
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  • Social Events
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Presentation Requirements

  • Speaker Instructions

Welcome, Conference Speakers!

We look forward to having you present at the SEG 2022 Conference, to be held August 27-30, 2022. This conference will be a hybrid event delivered both virtually and in person at the Sheraton Denver Downtown Hotel in Denver, CO, United States. We plan to remain flexible, with regular updates to be posted below as they become available.

You should have received an email containing complete instructions on uploading content to your account in the Abstract Manager. If you did not, please email Alice Bouley , SEG Managing Editor.

May 31, 2022 (MDT): Confirmation of your acceptance to present

June 30, 2022 (MDT): Presenter conference registration deadline

August 1, 2022 (MDT): Deadline for upload of pre-recorded presentations

August 25, 2022 (MDT): Speed talk and bonus content released to attendees

August 27-30, 2022 (MDT): SEG 2022 Conference

Speaker Training

Oral Presentations

  • Poster Presentations
  • Speed Talks
  • Bonus Content

All technical session speakers are required to respond to the "Oral Presenter Questions" in the Abstract Manager website so that we know if you plan to provide a live presentation (in person or virtually) or a pre-recorded presentation. Note: pre-recorded presentations must be uploaded by August 1, 2022.

We encourage you to include the SEG 2022 logo in your presentation slides.

Conference logo

Instructions for Pre-Recording

Presentations must be no longer than 15 minutes. Consider allowing time for questions, if desired. All presenters must provide pre-recorded copies of their presentations no later than August 1, 2021, regardless of whether they plan to provide a live presentation during the conference .

Presenters must assign copyright of their presentation to SEG. Without assignment of copyright your presentation will not be included in the virtual conference platform. Copyright transfer is part of the upload process.

Presentation Preparation and Requirements

  • Presentations are 15 minutes.
  • Presentation slides should be created at a 16:9 ratio.
  • Presentation video files should be created at a 16:9 ratio, and submitted in the MP4 format. Video should not be larger than 1080p (1920w x 1080h pixels) or smaller than 720p (1280w x 720h pixels). Please ensure your slides and face are both visible on the screen in the recording. See Microsoft's instructions for saving a presentation as a video .

Uploading Your File

Please note: The following instructions are for existing users who uploaded an abstract to the Abstract Manager website. If you were not required to upload an abstract, you will receive a link in the instruction letter that will take you to the upload area.

  • If you are an existing user, please return to the Abstract Manager website and sign in. From the main menu select "My Profile," then select the uploads link on the right side of the line in the "My Presentations" list to open the submission form. Drag and drop your presentation video file to the upload target area. Uploads for large files may take several minutes. When the upload is complete the uploaded filename will appear in the file list next to the target area. If the filename does not appear in the upload list then the upload has not been successful. If unsuccessful, please attempt a second time and if you are still unsuccessful, contact technical support at [email protected] .
  • After the upload is finished, please complete the assignment of copyright question and save your response.

Live Presentation Instructions: Virtual

Presentations given live during the SEG 2022 Conference will be streamed into the Hubilo virtual conference platform. A pre-recorded copy of your presentation is required and will serve as a backup in anticipation of unforeseeable connection issues during the event. Please review the information above for submitting your pre-recorded copy.

Live Presentation Instructions: In Person

Presentations provided in person will be presented on stage before an audience. The talk will be recorded and shared with virtual attendees in the Hubilo conference platform.

Borden Putnam

Edith Newton Wilson

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SEG 2022 Sponsors

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CDC plans to drop five-day covid isolation guidelines

what are presentation requirements

Americans who test positive for the coronavirus no longer need to routinely stay home from work and school for five days under new guidance planned by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The agency is loosening its covid isolation recommendations for the first time since 2021 to align it with guidance on how to avoid transmitting flu and RSV, according to four agency officials and an expert familiar with the discussions.

CDC officials acknowledged in internal discussions and in a briefing last week with state health officials how much the covid-19 landscape has changed since the virus emerged four years ago, killing nearly 1.2 million people in the United States and shuttering businesses and schools. The new reality — with most people having developed a level of immunity to the virus because of prior infection or vaccination — warrants a shift to a more practical approach, experts and health officials say.

“Public health has to be realistic,” said Michael T. Osterholm, an infectious-disease expert at the University of Minnesota. “In making recommendations to the public today, we have to try to get the most out of what people are willing to do. … You can be absolutely right in the science and yet accomplish nothing because no one will listen to you.”

The CDC plans to recommend that people who test positive for the coronavirus use clinical symptoms to determine when to end isolation. Under the new approach, people would no longer need to stay home if they have been fever-free for at least 24 hours without the aid of medication and their symptoms are mild and improving, according to three agency officials who spoke on the condition of anonymity to share internal discussions.

Here is the current CDC guidance on isolation and precautions for people with covid-19

The federal recommendations follow similar moves by Oregon and California . The White House has yet to sign off on the guidance that the agency is expected to release in April for public feedback, officials said. One agency official said the timing could “move around a bit” until the guidance is finalized.

Work on revising isolation guidance has been underway since last August but was paused in the fall as covid cases rose. CDC director Mandy Cohen sent staff a memo in January that listed “Pan-resp guidance-April” as a bullet point for the agency’s 2024 priorities.

Officials said they recognized the need to give the public more practical guidelines for covid-19, acknowledging that few people are following isolation guidance that hasn’t been updated since December 2021. Back then, health officials cut the recommended isolation period for people with asymptomatic coronavirus from 10 days to five because they worried essential services would be hobbled as the highly transmissible omicron variant sent infections surging. The decision was hailed by business groups and slammed by some union leaders and health experts.

Covid is here to stay. How will we know when it stops being special?

The plan to further loosen isolation guidance when the science around infectiousness has not changed is likely to prompt strong negative reaction from vulnerable groups, including people older than 65, those with weak immune systems and long-covid patients, CDC officials and experts said.

Doing so “sweeps this serious illness under the rug,” said Lara Jirmanus, a clinical instructor at Harvard Medical School and a member of the People’s CDC, a coalition of health-care workers, scientists and advocates focused on reducing the harmful effects of covid-19.

Public health officials should treat covid differently from other respiratory viruses, she said, because it’s deadlier than the flu and increases the risk of developing long-term complications . As many as 7 percent of Americans report having suffered from a slew of lingering covid symptoms, including fatigue, difficulty breathing, brain fog, joint pain and ongoing loss of taste and smell, according to the CDC.

The new isolation recommendations would not apply to hospitals and other health-care settings with more vulnerable populations, CDC officials said.

While the coronavirus continues to cause serious illness, especially among the most vulnerable people, vaccines and effective treatments such as Paxlovid are available. The latest versions of coronavirus vaccines were 54 percent effective at preventing symptomatic infection in adults, according to data released Feb. 1, the first U.S. study to assess how well the shots work against the most recent coronavirus variant. But CDC data shows only 22 percent of adults and 12 percent of children had received the updated vaccine as of Feb. 9, despite data showing the vaccines provide robust protection against serious illness .

Coronavirus levels in wastewater i ndicate that symptomatic and asymptomatic infections remain high. About 20,000 people are still hospitalized — and about 2,300 are dying — every week, CDC data show. But the numbers are falling and are much lower than when deaths peaked in January 2021 when almost 26,000 people died of covid each week and about 115,000 were hospitalized.

The lower rates of hospitalizations were among the reasons California shortened its five-day isolation recommendation last month , urging people to stay home until they are fever-free for 24 hours and their symptoms are mild and improving. Oregon made a similar move last May.

California’s state epidemiologist Erica Pan said the societal disruptions that resulted from strict isolation guidelines also helped spur the change. Workers without sick leave and those who can’t work from home if they or their children test positive and are required to isolate bore a disproportionate burden. Strict isolation requirements can act as a disincentive to test when testing should be encouraged so people at risk for serious illness can get treatment, she said.

Giving people symptom-based guidance, similar to what is already recommended for flu, is a better way to prioritize those most at risk and balance the potential for disruptive impacts on schools and workplaces, Pan said. After Oregon made its change, the state has not experienced any disproportionate increases in community transmission or severity, according to data shared last month with the national association representing state health officials.

California still recommends people with covid wear masks indoors when they are around others for 10 days after testing positive — even if they have no symptoms — or becoming sick. “You may remove your mask sooner than 10 days if you have two sequential negative tests at least one day apart,” the California guidance states.

It’s not clear whether the updated CDC guidance will continue to recommend masking for 10 days.

Health officials from other states told the CDC last week that they are already moving toward isolation guidelines that would treat the coronavirus the same as flu and RSV, with additional precautions for people at high risk, said Anne Zink, an emergency room physician and Alaska’s chief medical officer.

Many other countries, including the United Kingdom, Denmark, Finland, Norway and Australia, made changes to isolation recommendations in 2022. Of 16 countries whose policies California officials reviewed, only Germany and Ireland still recommend isolation for five days, according to a presentation the California public health department gave health officials from other states in January. The Singapore ministry of health, in updated guidance late last year, said residents could “return to normal activities” once coronavirus symptoms resolve.

Even before the Biden administration ended the public health emergency last May, much of the public had moved on from covid-19, with many people having long given up testing and masking, much less isolating when they come down with covid symptoms.

Doctors say the best way for sick people to protect their communities is to mask or avoid unnecessary trips outside the home.

“You see a lot of people with symptoms — you don’t know if they have covid or influenza or RSV — but in all three of those cases, they probably shouldn’t be at Target, coughing, and looking sick,” said Eli Perencevich, an internal medicine professor at the University of Iowa.

Coronavirus: What you need to know

New covid variant: The United States is in the throes of another covid-19 uptick and coronavirus samples detected in wastewater suggests infections could be as rampant as they were last winter. JN.1, the new dominant variant , appears to be especially adept at infecting those who have been vaccinated or previously infected. Here’s how this covid surge compares with earlier spikes .

Covid ER visits rise: Covid-19, flu and RSV are rebounding in the United States ahead of the end-of-year holidays, with emergency room visits for the three respiratory viruses collectively reaching their highest levels since February.

New coronavirus booster: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that anyone 6 months or older get an updated coronavirus shot , but the vaccine rollout has seen some hiccups , especially for children . Here’s what you need to know about the new coronavirus vaccines , including when you should get it.

  • CDC plans to drop five-day covid isolation guidelines February 13, 2024 CDC plans to drop five-day covid isolation guidelines February 13, 2024
  • Is this covid surge really the second biggest? Here’s what data shows. January 12, 2024 Is this covid surge really the second biggest? Here’s what data shows. January 12, 2024
  • Covid kills nearly 10,000 in a month as holidays fuel spread, WHO says January 11, 2024 Covid kills nearly 10,000 in a month as holidays fuel spread, WHO says January 11, 2024

what are presentation requirements

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Issues In-Depth| February 2024

Accounting and reporting for crypto intangible assets, accounting, presentation and disclosure for crypto intangible assets both in and out of scope of new asc 350-60..

Scott Muir

Partner, Dept. of Professional Practice, KPMG US

+1 212-909-5073

Nick Tricarichi

Nick Tricarichi

+1 571-538-2580

Many of the most common digital assets (e.g. bitcoin, ether, solana, cardano) are accounted for as intangible assets under US GAAP (crypto intangible assets). Newly-codified ASC 350-60 requires all crypto intangible assets in its scope to be measured at fair value after acquisition, and creates new presentation and disclosure requirements for those assets. Our Issues In-Depth outlines the accounting and reporting for both in-scope and out-of-scope crypto intangible assets.

Applicability

  • Entities that have, or are planning to acquire, crypto intangible assets – except for broker-dealers subject to ASC 940 or investment companies subject to ASC 946

Key impacts

Digital asset use cases and offerings continue to evolve and proliferate, but there remains only limited US GAAP that explicitly addresses the accounting for digital assets. We provide our perspectives on accounting for crypto intangible assets (a subset of all digital assets) by commercial and not-for-profit entities and summarize the guidance that applies to them.

The issues and considerations we identify are not exhaustive, and our views and observations may not reflect the only acceptable ones in practice in this evolving area. Our perspectives may change as practice continues to develop, if the FASB expands or amends its US GAAP guidance on the accounting for crypto intangible assets, or if the SEC staff expresses views.

We encourage entities to discuss their accounting for crypto intangible assets (and other digital assets) and their specific facts and circumstances with their auditors or other accounting advisors.  

Report contents

  • In a snapshot
  • What is a ‘crypto intangible asset’?
  • Scope of ASC 350-60
  • When you buy or otherwise acquire
  • While you hold a crypto intangible asset
  • When you sell or otherwise transfer
  • Financial statement presentation
  • Disclosures
  • Effective dates and transition for ASC 350-60 

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Home Blog Presentation Ideas Video Presentations: A Guide for Engaging Content

Video Presentations: A Guide for Engaging Content

Video Presentations: A Guide for Engaging Content

In a time when the Millennials’ attention span can be measured as little as 12 seconds, how can we create genuinely engaging presentations? Is continuously changing slides the answer these days?

A skilled presenter has to master different techniques; therefore, we will examine the potential for video presentations. Join us to discover what video presentations are, the reasons why you should use them amongst your presentation tools, and exciting tips on how to drive engagement from them. 

Table of Contents

What video presentations are

Video presentation stats to consider, different types of video presentations, why should you use video presentations, what are the components of a winning video presentation, the role of accessibility: advanced research on video presentations, 5 tips on how to make your video presentations engaging.

  • How to create a video presentation

Do you need special software to create video presentations?

Closing thoughts.

Presentations are a crucial part of business and academic environments. Thousands of presentations are delivered each day in different environments; still, many are doomed to fail. Although we can blame this on a lack of proper presentation skills , reality tells us there’s a change in how people prefer to see the content.

As a general rule, consider 10 minutes the Goldilocks Zone for traditional presentations in what comes to audience engagement . Inspirational presentations like the ones we see on TEDx don’t follow this rule, as the objective here is to share a compelling story as detailed as possible so the audience can relate. In some cases, academic presentations of the thesis defense style remain loyal to a specific format. Still, trends are also changing, and video presentations have much to offer in terms of exposing complex concepts more plainly.

A video presentation can be represented in multiple formats: as a compendium of animated slides in video format, video files and audio sources packed on a single video file, a video recording made in interview format, a video documentary, etc. Although this definition may sound redundant, the concept behind a video presentation is that they don’t require a presenter to change between slides or windows to browse different assets . Hence, the importance to create a story behind the video presentation, so the various elements don’t feel segregated without logic.

We can say people use the video format to convey information in courses, job training, edutainment, conferences, and any kind of message-sharing purpose that requires connecting with the audience for engagement.

Before dwelling on the specifics of building a video presentation, here we share some video presentation stats that speak about the importance of video presentations these days from a marketing perspective.

  • Online search continues to be the most common way (45%) for users to find instructional and informational video content. ( source )
  • The most commonly-created types of videos are explainer videos (72%) , presentation videos (49%), testimonial videos (48%), sales videos (42%), and video ads (42%). ( source )
  • 57% of consumers said that product videos make them more confident in a purchase and less likely to return an item ( source )
  • Millennials’ attention span can be measured as little as 12 seconds ( source )
  • A minute of video is worth 1.8 million words in terms of information retention ( source )

As you can see, the effort of building a video presentation is well-paid in terms of consumption and content information retention from the audience.

Depending on the requirements of the presentation itself, we can classify video presentations as follows:

In-Company Video Presentations

These video presentations belong to the business and corporate world, but their purpose is to distribute information among coworkers or to coach the personnel for a specific requirement. In-company video presentations are used in workspace training, as part of internal recruitment processes, or other kinds of internal presentations.

In-company video presentations usually carry the company branding; they have restricted access for people outside the organization, so their distribution methods happen in meeting rooms dedicated to these purposes. 

Business Video Presentations

Business video presentations are used for a variety of business purposes: business pitches, workspace training, advertisement, product releases, recruitment, and more. Business video presentations also include the ones dedicated to  B2B or B2C relationships. 

Like In-Company Video Presentations, they carry branding to identify the video presentation’s author quickly. They are shared through official mediums for the company (like a brand’s social media channels and website), during corporate meetings with investors or potential business partners, and through 3rd. party channels.

Example of Product Launch Video Presentation by Xiaomi

Examples of these kinds of videos are product launch sessions, much like what tech giants like Xiaomi do.

Another kind of business video presentation is the explainer video. Explainer videos can be defined as short online marketing videos that are used to explain the company’s product or service. Explainer videos are commonly used for sales, marketing, and training purposes. Here is a real example of a 1-minute video presentation introducing SlideModel.com.

Another application of business video presentations is when sponsorship deals are involved, as brands can present their value to influencers through short reels.

Resume Video Presentations

This is a relatively recent but incredible turn of resume presentations. In resume video presentations , the candidate offers a detailed introduction of their capabilities, skills, interests, and potential value to the employer in a visually engaging format.

Unlike traditional CV presentations, the video format gives little room for anxiety, answering most of the interviewer’s questions or even driving admiration for the effort and dedication to this job-hunting adventure. 

We recommend the usage of resume presentation templates for this purpose, as they save tons of time in crafting a high-quality resume video presentation. 

Educational Video Presentations

This category can be divided into three different sub-categories:

Academic Video Presentations

Intended for University-level presentations or post-Doctorate work, these presentations follow strict format guidelines. They are mainly designed to distribute data comprehensively, with proper documentation backup. Animations usually don’t take part in these video presentations.

Despite being commonly associated with business events, conferences also belong to the academic video presentations category, as the live sessions are recorded to spread the message about important research discoveries. 

Teaching & Training Video Presentations

Teachers introduce the presentations to their students on various topics to understand abstract issues better. Chemistry, Physics, and Geography are typical examples of subjects that use video presentations. However, subjects like History and Philosophy can save countless hours of whiteboard sessions by using educational video presentations. 

Webinars fall under this category, either being released to the public or in-company webinars, as they share common aspects in their structure. Do keep in mind that educational content recorded as video presentations is not the same as a webinar, as the latter requires the presence of a live audience, a moderator, and usually a Q&A session at the end of it. If we talk about educational content being recorded and released as a course platform, then we can say it is a workshop.

According to recent studies, visualizations through video presentations and video-based learning can enhance understanding. It is demonstrated that students who watched learning videos on Statistics, influenced engagement and motivation positively .

Student Video Presentations

Finally, students also make video presentations as requested by their teachers to present a lesson or project exhibition. These presentations vary as the students grow older, becoming less dependent on animated effects, setting the bases for future work or academic presentation formats.

Informal Video Presentations

If you remember seeing videos in situations like 50th birthday parties, baptisms, wedding anniversaries, etc., then you have already experienced informal video presentations. 

These informal presentations are free from any format restriction. As the term implies, they are used for any kind of meetup, making it simpler to share a story rather than to tell a lengthy story.

Inspirational & Motivational Video Presentations

The final category belongs to the video presentations with a strong emotional component. They are built to connect, to empathize with the audience in specific situations or problems. Examples of this are TEDx , Evan Carmichael, or similar influencing platforms.

In general lines, motivational video presentations are recordings of live events shared with the purpose of getting the message to the biggest audience possible (internet consumers). Another possible format for these presentations is recorded interviews or testimonials intended to speak about a person’s contributions to society. An example of this, from an organization’s point of view, are the videos produced by the UK’s NHS to highlight and thank their medical personnel for their efforts during the COVID-19 pandemic. 

Inspirational video presentations share common aspects with motivational speeches. A list of requirements for these video presentations would be:

  • Have a clear purpose
  • Make it personal
  • Get the message tailored for the target audience
  • A strong conclusion

Compared with traditional presentation methods, such as presentation slides or speaking in front of an audience, video presentations can offer a series of advantages. 

For starters, as you write the “ story ,” you are also rehearsing the points to be covered. In that way, anxiety or shyness won’t trigger you to forget about essential points or lose track of time. The length of the presentation can be predetermined, depending on the external requirements of the organization party, or how comprehensive or concise you need it to be. 

In the case of people struggling with camera shyness , an animated video presentation with voiceover is the answer to deliver quality work. Since psychologists and doctors agree the common point on fear of public speaking is the delivery of the presentation itself, video presentations shall reduce work-induced anxiety to a great degree. Since psychologists and doctors agree the common point on fear of public speaking is the delivery of the presentation itself, video presentations shall reduce work-induced anxiety to a great degree. You can also convert images to video online using video editor platforms to easily create video from images and voiceover on video.

Video presentations can be persuasive thanks to the usage of graphics and audio. It is far easier to convey emotions through video presentations than to put them in the presentation design. Also, research by Dr. James McQuivey proved that a minute of video is worth 1.8 million words in terms of information retention.

Regarding engagement, the popularity that both TikTok and YouTube gained among the younger generations reflects the behavioral changes in content consumption . It has come to the point that even professionals use TikTok to demystify health hoaxes and help users worldwide. Therefore, using video format for presentations can help to boost your presentation performance, making it attractive for your audience and less effort-demanding. 

The most significant factor in delivering a successful video presentation is keeping the audience engaged. To ensure this, make sure the presentation doesn’t feel robotic-like but that it conveys a personal message. Don’t get this point wrong if we talk strictly about business or academic scenarios; making video presentations to deliver your personal touch can become as simple as selecting the proper color combination to enforce your message . Other solutions come from watching your voice tone not to make it too monotonous. 

Structure your presentation accordingly. In business or academic video presentations is a good idea to introduce a slide in the fashion of a table of contents . It is an extra touch that brings the audience closer to the topics due to be discussed. 

Consider the audience’s perspective as a vital element in video presentations. Check relevant examples of the topic discussed on platforms such as YouTube or DailyMotion. Compare their approach to yours and assert if you would watch your presentation as a spectator or not. This simple test gives insights into which aspects you should work on.

Winning video presentations never miss the usage of CTAs. It’s a good method to direct the audience’s interest to a specific goal.

Video presentations can become an incredible tool for driving engagement, yet there is a problem that not so many presenters address: accessibility. Think about how many times a presenter ends a phrase like “over here,” assuming the audience is watching the item being shown. But what if members of the target audience have visual impairments?

Much like we consider the importance of adding Closed Captioning (CC) to our videos, accessibility in terms of the narrative is a must. On this behalf, we want to introduce an interesting research that led to the production of a tool named Slidecho . Using state-of-the-art technology like video scene detection, AI, and OCR, Slideshow follows these very steps:

  • Step 1: Extract slide frames
  • Step 2: Selecting slide elements
  • Step 3: Detecting described elements from the slide elements
  • Step 4: Aligning slides with the speech

Therefore, Slidecho uses an algorithmic methodology to extract the visual elements from the slides, converting them to an audio reading format whilst aligning it with the original speaker’s narration. Moreover, its interface instantiates new interactions that augment the plain video interface with synchronized slide information and audio notifications to alert users to undescribed elements.

This technological advance helps the audience better understand what is being presented, regardless of the context of the presentation. Imagine an award ceremony where many references apply to visual cues. People with visual impairments get half of the message, with luck, when presenters fall into colloquial language usage, not understanding the context or having to ask for clarification. If instead, the synced narration is available, we then talk about making presentations available for everyone. This is an accurate definition of enriching an event experience.

If we talk about attending to the needs of people with hearing impairments, we have to consider the social factor as a motivator in presentations. It is a common mistake to leave slides filled with text and voiceover narration in the background providing detailed information. A study made by Stanford University speaks about the value of having the presenter’s face available through these slides, as it delivers both social cues plus helps users through lip reading. The human factor also reduces distractions since the audience must check the presenter’s input on written slides.

Example of video instruction with lecture slides in the back - Effects on information retention, visual attention and affect.

Tip #1 – Be mindful of the presentation topic

It’s not the same to create a presentation for a business audience as an inspirational presentation. The category of the presentation shall determine items like

  • Background music
  • Color theme
  • Visual hierarchy
  • Videos to include

Tip #2 – Limit the number of words to include

The whole idea behind the video presentation is to make a dynamic presentation, not having to pause every 5 seconds to allow the spectator to read.

Instead, use words to transmit powerful messages, such as quotes relevant to the presented topic, key information, or CTAs. Use the 7×7 rule: no slide should have more than 7 lines of text, and no sentence should have more than 7 words. 

Tip #3 – Voiceovers can become your best friends

The whole point behind a video presentation is not to create a boring one-person video speaking in front of the camera. Use voiceovers effectively to introduce charts, data feedback, etc., with your voice connecting the points of the entire presentation.

Be mindful of the tone. A monotonous or flat tone can divert attention and induce people to ignore your work. Your voice skills should articulate the importance of the point being discussed as well as your interest in it.

Tip #4 – The power of transitions

Adding suitable transitions and animations makes the presentation more engaging . However, this isn’t equal to adding countless effects. Less is more.

Ask a professional for guidance if you don’t have experience with animation effects. The transition can be part of the conversation, being subtle if the presentation is flowing between data sets or similar topics, or contrasting and powerful to deliver a persuasive message. You may also want to insert a transition when you’ve used a video cutter to remove an unwanted part to smooth out the video flow. Don’t abuse any of the two extremes, or the audience may find it uncomfortable.

Tip #5 – Make video presentations accessible

As we mentioned before, quite often presenters assume the audience can understand every part of a video presentation. Reality tells us to attend to the needs of people with visual and auditory impairments by making audio and video media accessible .

Subtitles or translator screen-over using sign language is a perfect opportunity to help people with auditory impairments feel part of the presentation, making the message available to them as well. 

For people with visual impairments, be mindful about how you create the narrative for your presentation, in particular, avoiding visual cues like: “over here,” “this,” and “there” and gesticulating over an object or person, assuming everyone can get the same reference information. Instead, opt to be descriptive in your speech; software solutions can help a great deal, but you can also use native PowerPoint or Google Slides tools such as voiceovers .

How to create a video presentation & recommended video presentation templates

You can create your own video presentations as easily as using Microsoft PowerPoint, Apple Keynotes, or Google Slides.

Check these links for relevant information on how to create a video presentation:

  • How to Convert a Google Slides Presentation to a Video
  • How to Convert a PowerPoint Presentation to a Video
  • How to Embed a YouTube Video in PowerPoint

In case you feel stuck about which content to input or how to make your video presentation outstanding, a brainstorming technique can do wonders for interactive presentations and creative thinking. It is known as the SCAMPER technique .

Since video presentation templates make our life easier, we also recommend you check the following product categories to access extremely visually appealing designs created by professionals to help you deliver your message in style:

  • Animated PowerPoint Templates
  • Animated Text Banner Templates
  • Academic PowerPoint Templates
  • Business PowerPoint Templates
  • Marketing PowerPoint Templates

Additionally, here you can preview some of our presentation templates that you can use to create a video presentation in PowerPoint.

1. Animated PowerPoint Charts Collection Template

Business Charts Template Slide

Present data in a visually appealing format by using this collection of animated charts in PowerPoint. Fully customizable, this template brings ease to speak about data-driven presentations; hence becoming a vital asset for any presenter in the corporate world.

Use This Template

2. Animated Network Diagram PowerPoint Template

what are presentation requirements

Simplify the different streams that take part in your project or product release with the help of this animated template design. This Animated Network Diagram template can help you expose the processes that, with integrated effort, evolve into a successful outcome. It has animations applied to the objects, plus transitions to make the presentation more fluid.

Fully editable with any version of PowerPoint.

3. Free Animated Editable Professional Infographics PowerPoint Template

what are presentation requirements

Infographics are a powerful tool that every presenter must consider for their work. This Free Animated Infographics template allows presenters to communicate complex data pieces, build marketing strategies, or prepare professional-looking reports. 

You can find a broad variety of charts and graphs. These are fully editable by using the chart filter option to edit on a spreadsheet.

4. Free Animated Editable Infographic PowerPoint Slides

3D Circular Stack Diagram PPT

If you intend to present financial data or KPIs for your marketing projects, look no further: this Free Animated Editable Infographic Template for PowerPoint has it all. 

Arranged in an 8-slide deck, we find a compendium of graphic elements to represent complex data in a visually compelling manner. Fully editable in all versions of PowerPoint

5. Free Animated Business PowerPoint Template

what are presentation requirements

This versatile free presentation template for PowerPoint makes the perfect tool for more than business presentations: it works perfectly for educational video presentations and even inspirational video presentations.

With 9 fully editable slides, you can build your video presentation by using a unique combination of graphic elements, animations, and transitions. The graphics elements on this template are oriented to highlight leadership concepts.

6. Free Animated Business Infographics PowerPoint Template

what are presentation requirements

Use this free template to create powerful statements backed by data in your video presentations. With a broad selection of graphs, diagrams, and charts, this fully editable template can help presenters to discuss topics ranging from demographics, economy, marketing indicators, or other relevant research results in an easy-to-understand format.

Compatible with all versions of PowerPoint, Google Slides, and Keynote.

You also need to consider the output format of your video presentations. For maximum compatibility, you can use  MP4 or MOV. Other alternatives include:

  • MKV : The native format of most 4K videos due to being able to store multiple audio tracks. Ideal for presentations with different voiceover languages that presenters can pick from.
  • WMV : It’s a quality format for rendering videos to be shared via e-mail, although not compatible with some devices. Installing codecs is advised. 
  • WebM : This format is one of the preferred choices for online video libraries or live streaming services, but it can present compatibility issues. 

The answer to this question entirely depends on your aim for creating video presentations. For most presenters, PowerPoint and Google Slides will do a good job, allowing them to use features such as voiceovers, transitions, animations, and high-quality graphics.

If instead, you desire to make advanced effects, screen recordings, or toon-like animations with voiceovers, then you should check the following list of solutions:

  • Camtasia (Techsmith) : It is a professional video editing software, much lighter and easier to use than Adobe Premiere or Sony Vegas. You can create professional transition or animation effects, work with layers to add multiple sounds or video sources and create screen recordings.
  • Adobe Premiere Pro : The industry-leading software in video editing. This often intimidating software by Adobe has all the requirements for professional video editing, plus full integration with third-party plugins or other software from the Adobe suite to enhance the video result.
  • Sony Vegas Pro : It is considered a direct competitor to Adobe Premiere Pro, less demanding in hardware requirements, and somewhat more user-friendly.
  • Final Cut Pro : For Mac users, this is the option to consider if we talk about video editing. Powerful and tailored for the hardware the Mac device has.

As we have seen in this article, video presentations are far from obsolete. It is a truly engaging method to divulge our ideas, especially if we target a younger audience. 

Take your time to write a compelling story to tell rather than spilling animations and transitions along the way. Professional-made video presentations always care about details and the takeaway message for the spectator. 

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