Microsoft

Game Central

solve these math problems write out the numbers

Download on App Store

  • Solve equations and inequalities
  • Simplify expressions
  • Factor polynomials
  • Graph equations and inequalities
  • Advanced solvers
  • All solvers
  • Arithmetics
  • Determinant
  • Percentages
  • Scientific Notation
  • Inequalities

Download on App Store

What can QuickMath do?

QuickMath will automatically answer the most common problems in algebra, equations and calculus faced by high-school and college students.

  • The algebra section allows you to expand, factor or simplify virtually any expression you choose. It also has commands for splitting fractions into partial fractions, combining several fractions into one and cancelling common factors within a fraction.
  • The equations section lets you solve an equation or system of equations. You can usually find the exact answer or, if necessary, a numerical answer to almost any accuracy you require.
  • The inequalities section lets you solve an inequality or a system of inequalities for a single variable. You can also plot inequalities in two variables.
  • The calculus section will carry out differentiation as well as definite and indefinite integration.
  • The matrices section contains commands for the arithmetic manipulation of matrices.
  • The graphs section contains commands for plotting equations and inequalities.
  • The numbers section has a percentages command for explaining the most common types of percentage problems and a section for dealing with scientific notation.

Math Topics

More solvers.

  • Add Fractions
  • Simplify Fractions

solve these math problems write out the numbers

  • HW Guidelines
  • Study Skills Quiz
  • Find Local Tutors
  • Demo MathHelp.com
  • Join MathHelp.com

Select a Course Below

  • ACCUPLACER Math
  • Math Placement Test
  • PRAXIS Math
  • + more tests
  • 5th Grade Math
  • 6th Grade Math
  • Pre-Algebra
  • College Pre-Algebra
  • Introductory Algebra
  • Intermediate Algebra
  • College Algebra

"Number" Word Problems

What are "number" word problems.

Number word problems involve relationships between different numbers; these exercises ask you to find some number (or numbers) based on those relationships.

Content Continues Below

MathHelp.com

Number Word Problems on MathHelp.com

Algebra Word Problems

How do you solve number word problems?

To set up and solve number word problems, it is important clearly to label variables and expressions, using your translation skills to convert the words into algebra. The process of clear labelling will often end up doing nearly all of the work for you.

Number word problems are usually fairly contrived, but they're also fairly standard. Keep in mind that the point of these exercises isn't their relation to "real life", but rather the growth of your ability to extract the mathematics from the English. These exercises are a great way to stretch your mental muscles, use what you know already, apply your logic (and common sense), and then hippity-hop your way to the answer.

What is an example of solving a number word problem?

  • The sum of two consecutive integers is 15 . Find the numbers.

They've given me many pieces of information here.

  • I'm adding (that is, summing) two things
  • the numbers are integers (like −3 and 6 )
  • the second number is 1 more than the first
  • the result of the addition will be 15

Advertisement

How do I know that the second number will be larger than the first by 1 ? Because the two integers are "consecutive", which means "one right after the other, not skipping over anything between". (Examples of consecutive integers would be −12 and −11 , 1 and 2 , and 99 and 100 .)

The "integers" are the number zero, the whole numbers, and the negatives of the whole numbers. In going from one integer to the next consecutive integer, I'll have gone up by one unit.

I need to figure out what are the two numbers that I'm adding. The second number is defined in terms of the first number, so I'll pick a variable to stand for this number that I don't yet know:

1st number: n

The second number is one more than the first, so my expression for the second number is:

2nd number: n + 1

I know that I'm supposed to add these two numbers, and that the result will be (in other words, I should set the sum equal to) 15 . This, along with my translation skills, allows me to create an equation, being the algebraic equivalent to "(this number) added to (the next number) is (fifteen)":

n + ( n + 1) = 15

This is a linear equation that I can solve :

2 n + 1 = 15

The exercise did not ask me for the value of the variable n ; it asked for the identity of two numbers. So my answer is not " n  = 7 "; the actual answer, taking into account the second number, too, is:

The numbers are 7 and 8 .

It usually isn't required that you write your answer out like this; sometimes a very minimal " 7, 8 " is regarded as acceptible form. But the exercise asked me, in complete sentences, a question about two numbers; I feel like it's good form to answer that question in the form of a complete sentence.

What do they mean when they say "consecutive even (or odd) integers"?

Some number word problems will refer to "consecutive even (or odd) integers". This means that they're talking about two whole numbers (or their negatives) that are both even or else both odd; in particular, the two numbers are 2 units apart.

  • The product of two consecutive negative even integers is 24 . Find the numbers.

I'll start with extracting the information they've given me.

  • I'm multiplying (that is, finding the product of) two things
  • those two things are numbers
  • those two numbers are integers
  • those two integers are even
  • those two even integers are negative
  • the second even integer is 2 units more than the first
  • when I multiply, I'll get 24

How do I know that one number will be 2 more than the other? Because these numbers are consecutive even integers; the "consecutive" part means "the one right after the other", and the "even" part means that the numbers are two units apart. (Examples of consecutive even integers are 10 and 12 , −14 and −16 , and 0 and 2 .)

The second number is defined in terms of the first number, so I'll pick a variable for the first number. Then the second number will be two units more than this.

1st number: n 2nd number: n + 2

When I multiply these two numbers, I'm supposed to get 24 . This gives me my equation:

( n )( n + 2) = 24

This is a quadratic equation that I can solve :

( n )( n + 2) = 24 n 2 + 2 n = 24 n 2 + 2 n − 24 = 0 ( n + 6)( n − 4) = 0

This equation clearly has two solutions, being n  = −6 and n  = 4 . Since the numbers I am looking for are negative, I can ignore the " 4 " solution value and instead use the n  = −6 solution.

Then the next number, being larger than the first number by 2 , must be n  + 2 = −4 , and my answer is:

The numbers are −6 and −4 .

In the exercise above, one of the solutions to the exercise — namely, n  = −6 — was one of the solutions to the equation; the other solution to the equation — namely, n  = 4 — had the sign opposite to the other answer to the exercise.

You will encounter this pattern often in solving this type of word problem. However, do not assume that you can use both solutions if you just change the signs to be whatever you think they ought to be. While this often works, it does not always work, and it's sure to annoy your grader. Instead, throw out invalid results, and solve properly for the valid ones.

Algebra Tutors

  • Twice the larger of two numbers is three more than five times the smaller, and the sum of four times the larger and three times the smaller is 71 . What are the numbers?

The point of exercises like this is to give me practice in unwrapping and unwinding these words, somehow turning the words into algebraic expressions and equations. The point is in the setting-up and solving, not in the relative "reality" of the exercise. That said, how do I solve this? The best first step is to start labelling.

I need to find two numbers and, this time, they haven't given me any relationship between the two, like "two consecutive even integers". Since neither number is defined by the other, I'll need two letters to stand for the two unknowns. I'll need to remember to label the variables with their definitions.

the larger number:  x

the smaller number:  y

Now I can create expressions and then an equation for the first relationship they give me:

twice the larger:  2 x

three more than five times the smaller:  5 y + 3

relationship between ("is"):  2 x = 5 y + 3

And now for the other relationship they gave me:

four times the larger:  4 x

three times the smaller:  3 y

relationship between ("sum of"):  4 x + 3 y = 71

Now I have two equations in two variables:

2 x = 5 y + 3

4 x + 3 y = 71

I will solve, say, the first equation for x = :

x = (5/2) y + (3/2)

(There's no right or wrong in this choice; it's just what I happened to choose while I was writing up this page.)

Then I'll plug the right-hand side of this into the second equation in place of the x :

4[ (5/2) y + (3/2) ] + 3 y = 71

10 y + 6 + 3 y = 71

13 y + 6 = 71

y = 65/13 = 5

Now that I have the value for y , I can back-solve for x :

x = (5/2)(5) + (3/2)

x = (25/2) + (3/2)

x = 28/2 = 14

As always, I need to remember to answer the question that was actually asked. The solution here is not " x  = 14 ", but is instead the following:

larger number: 14

smaller number: 5

What are the steps for solving "number" word problems?

The steps for solving "number" word problems are these:

  • Read the exercise through once; don't try to start solving it before you even know what it says.
  • Figure out what you know (for instance, are you adding or multiplying?).
  • Figure out what you don't know; this will probably be the value(s) of number(s).
  • Pick one or more useful variables for unknown(s) that you need to find.
  • Use the variable(s) and the known information to create expressions.
  • Use these expressions and the known information to create one or more equations.
  • Solve the equation(s) for the unknown(s).
  • Check your definition(s) for your variable(s).
  • Use this/these definition(s) to state your answer in clear terms.

But more than any list, the trick to doing this type of problem is to label everything very explicitly. Until you become used to doing these, do not attempt to keep track of things in your head. Do as I did in this last example: clearly label every single step; make your meaning clear not only to the grader but to yourself. When you do this, these problems generally work out rather easily.

URL: https://www.purplemath.com/modules/numbprob.htm

Standardized Test Prep

College math, homeschool math, share this page.

  • Terms of Use
  • Privacy / Cookies
  • About Purplemath
  • About the Author
  • Tutoring from PM
  • Advertising
  • Linking to PM
  • Site licencing

Visit Our Profiles

solve these math problems write out the numbers

Library homepage

  • school Campus Bookshelves
  • menu_book Bookshelves
  • perm_media Learning Objects
  • login Login
  • how_to_reg Request Instructor Account
  • hub Instructor Commons
  • Download Page (PDF)
  • Download Full Book (PDF)
  • Periodic Table
  • Physics Constants
  • Scientific Calculator
  • Reference & Cite
  • Tools expand_more
  • Readability

selected template will load here

This action is not available.

Mathematics LibreTexts

3.11: Problem Bank

  • Last updated
  • Save as PDF
  • Page ID 10386

  • Michelle Manes
  • University of Hawaii

Compute the following using dots and boxes:

99916131 : 31

637824 : 302

2125122 : 1011

  • Fill in the squares using the digits 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9 exactly one time each to make the largest possible sum: $$\begin{split} \Box\; \Box\; \Box \\ +\; \Box\; \Box\; \Box \\ \hline \end{split}$$
  • Fill in the squares using the digits 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9 exactly one time each to make the smallest possible (positive) difference: $$\begin{split} \Box\; \Box\; \Box \\ -\; \Box\; \Box\; \Box \\ \hline \end{split}$$
  • Make a base six addition table.
  • Use the table to solve these subtraction problems. $$13_{six} - 5_{six} \qquad 12_{six} - 3_{six} \qquad 10_{six} - 4_{six} \ldotp$$

Do these calculations in base four. Don’t translate to base 10 and then calculate there — try to work in base four.

  • $$33_{four} + 11_{four}$$
  • $$123_{four} + 22_{four}$$
  • $$223_{four} - 131_{four}$$
  • $$112_{four} - 33_{four}$$
  • Make a base five multiplication table.
  • Use the table to solve these subtraction problems. $$11_{five} \div 2_{five} \qquad 22_{five} \div 3_{five} \qquad 13_{five} \div 4_{five} \ldotp$$
  • Here is a true fact in base five: $$2_{five} \cdot 3_{five} = 11_{five}$$Write the rest of this four fact family.
  • Here is a true fact in base five: $$13_{five} \div 2_{five} = 4_{five}$$Write the rest of this four fact family.

Directions for AlphaMath Problems (Problems 38 – 41):

  • Letters stand for digits 0–9.
  • In a given problem, the same letter always represents the same digit, and different letters always represent different digits.
  • There is no relation between problems (so “A” in part 1 and “A” in part 3 might be different).
  • Two, three, and four digit numbers never start with a zero.
  • Your job: Figure out what digit each letter stands for, so that the calculation shown is correct.

Notes: In part 2, “O” represents the letter “oh,” not the digit zero.

  • $$\begin{split} A & \\ A & \\ +\; A & \\ \hline H\; A & \end{split}$$
  • $$\begin{split} O\; N\; E & \\ +\; O\; N\; E & \\ \hline T\; W\; O & \end{split}$$
  • $$\begin{split} A\; B\; C & \\ +\; A\; C\; B & \\ \hline C\; B\; A & \end{split}$$

Here’s another AlphaMath problem. \[\begin{split} T\; E\; N & \\ +\; N\; O\; T & \\ \hline N\; I\; N\; E & \end{split} \nonumber \]

  • Solve this AlphaMath problem in base 10.
  • Now solve it in base 6.

Find all solutions to this AlphaMath problem in base 9 .

Notes: Even though this is two calculations, it is a single problem . All T’s in both calculations represent the same digit, all B’s represent the same digit, and so on.

Remember that “O” represents the letter “oh” and not the digit zero, and that two and three digit numbers never start with the digit zero

\[ \begin{split} T\; O & \\ -\; B\; E & \\ \hline O\; R & \end{split} \qquad \begin{split} N\; O\; T & \\ -\; T\; O & \\ \hline B\; E & \end{split} \nonumber \]

This is a single AlphaMath problem. (So all G’s represent the same digit. All A’s represent the same digit. And so on.)

Solve the problem in base 6 . \[GALON = (GOO)^{2} \qquad \qquad ALONG = (OOG)^{2} \nonumber \]

  • Which of the following base seven numbers are perfect squares? For each number, answer yes (it is a perfect square) or no (it is not a perfect square) and give a justification of your answer. $$4_{seven} \qquad 25_{seven} \qquad 51_{seven}$$

Geoff spilled coffee on his homework. The answers were correct. Can you determine the missing digits and the bases?

InkSpill-300x101.png

  • Rewrite each subtraction problem as an addition problem: $$x - 156 = 279 \qquad 279 - 156 = x \qquad a - x = b \ldotp$$
  • Rewrite each division problem as a multiplication problem: $$24 \div x = 12 \qquad x \div 3 = 27 \qquad a \div b = x \ldotp$$

Which of the following models represent the same multiplication problem? Explain your answer.

multpic1-300x227.png

Show an area model for each of these multiplication problems. Write down the standard computation next to the area model and see how it compares. \[20 \times 33 \qquad 24 \times 13 \qquad 17 \times 11 \nonumber \]

Suppose the 2 key on your calculator is broken. How could you still use the calculator compute these products? Think about what properties of multiplication might be helpful. (Write out the calculation you would do on the calculator, not just the answer.) \[1592 \times 3344 \qquad 2008 \times 999 \qquad 655 \times 525 \nonumber \]

Today is Jennifer’s birthday, and she’s twice as old as her brother. When will she be twice as old as him again? Choose the best answer and justify your choice.

  • Jennifer will always be twice as old as her brother.
  • It will happen every two years.
  • It depends on Jennifer’s age.
  • It will happen when Jennifer is twice as old as she is now.
  • It will never happen again.
  • Find the quotient and remainder for each problem. $$7 \div 3 \qquad 3 \div 7 \qquad 7 \div 1 \qquad 1 \div 7$$
  • How many possible remainders are there when dividing by these numbers? Justify what you say. $$2 \qquad 12 \qquad 62 \qquad 23$$

Identify each problem as either partitive or quotative division and say why you made that choice. Then solve the problem.

  • Adriana bought 12 gallons of paint. If each room requires three gallons of paint, how many rooms can she paint?
  • Chris baked 15 muffins for his family of five. How many muffins does each person get?
  • Prof. Davidson gave three straws to each student for an activity. She used 51 straws. How many students are in her class?

Use the digits 1 through 9. Use each digit exactly once. Fill in the squares to make all of the equations true. \[\begin{split} \Box - \Box = \Box & \\ \times & \\ \Box \div \Box = \Box & \\ = & \\ \Box + \Box = \Box & \end{split} \nonumber \]

If you're seeing this message, it means we're having trouble loading external resources on our website.

If you're behind a web filter, please make sure that the domains *.kastatic.org and *.kasandbox.org are unblocked.

To log in and use all the features of Khan Academy, please enable JavaScript in your browser.

Course: 8th grade   >   Unit 2

Sums of consecutive integers.

  • Sum of integers challenge
  • Solving equations with one unknown: FAQ

Want to join the conversation?

  • Upvote Button navigates to signup page
  • Downvote Button navigates to signup page
  • Flag Button navigates to signup page

Good Answer

Video transcript

Appendix A: Applications

Using a problem-solving strategy to solve number problems, learning outcomes.

  • Apply the general problem-solving strategy to number problems
  • Identify how many numbers you are solving for given a number problem
  • Solve consecutive integer problems

Now we will translate and solve number problems. In number problems, you are given some clues about one or more numbers, and you use these clues to build an equation. Number problems don’t usually arise on an everyday basis, but they provide a good introduction to practicing the Problem-Solving Strategy. Remember to look for clue words such as difference , of , and and .

The difference of a number and six is [latex]13[/latex]. Find the number.

The sum of twice a number and seven is [latex]15[/latex]. Find the number.

Show Solution

Watch the following video to see another example of how to solve a number problem.

Solving for Two or More Numbers

Some number word problems ask you to find two or more numbers. It may be tempting to name them all with different variables, but so far we have only solved equations with one variable. We will define the numbers in terms of the same variable. Be sure to read the problem carefully to discover how all the numbers relate to each other.

One number is five more than another. The sum of the numbers is twenty-one. Find the numbers.

Watch the following video to see another example of how to find two numbers given the relationship between the two.

The sum of two numbers is negative fourteen. One number is four less than the other. Find the numbers.

One number is ten more than twice another. Their sum is one. Find the numbers.

Solving for Consecutive Integers

Consecutive integers are integers that immediately follow each other. Some examples of consecutive integers are:

[latex]\begin{array}{c}\phantom{\rule{0.2em}{0ex}}\\ \phantom{\rule{0.2em}{0ex}}\\ \phantom{\rule{0.2em}{0ex}}\\ \phantom{\rule{0.2em}{0ex}}\\ \hfill \text{…}1,2,3,4\text{,…}\hfill \end{array}[/latex] [latex]\text{…}-10,-9,-8,-7\text{,…}[/latex] [latex]\text{…}150,151,152,153\text{,…}[/latex]

Notice that each number is one more than the number preceding it. So if we define the first integer as [latex]n[/latex], the next consecutive integer is [latex]n+1[/latex]. The one after that is one more than [latex]n+1[/latex], so it is [latex]n+1+1[/latex], or [latex]n+2[/latex].

[latex]\begin{array}{cccc}n\hfill & & & \text{1st integer}\hfill \\ n+1\hfill & & & \text{2nd consecutive integer}\hfill \\ n+2\hfill & & & \text{3rd consecutive integer}\hfill \end{array}[/latex]

The sum of two consecutive integers is [latex]47[/latex]. Find the numbers.

Find three consecutive integers whose sum is [latex]42[/latex].

Watch this video for another example of how to find three consecutive integers given their sum.

  • Ex: Linear Equation Application with One Variable - Number Problem. Authored by : James Sousa (Mathispower4u.com). Located at : https://youtu.be/juslHscrh8s . License : CC BY: Attribution
  • Ex: Write and Solve an Equation for Consecutive Natural Numbers with a Given Sum. Authored by : James Sousa (Mathispower4u.com). Located at : https://youtu.be/Bo67B0L9hGs . License : CC BY: Attribution
  • Write and Solve a Linear Equations to Solve a Number Problem (1) Mathispower4u . Authored by : James Sousa (Mathispower4u.com) for Lumen Learning. Located at : https://youtu.be/izIIqOztUyI . License : CC BY: Attribution
  • Question ID 142763, 142770, 142775, 142806, 142811, 142816, 142817. Authored by : Lumen Learning. License : CC BY: Attribution . License Terms : IMathAS Community License, CC-BY + GPL
  • Prealgebra. Provided by : OpenStax. License : CC BY: Attribution . License Terms : Download for free at http://cnx.org/contents/[email protected]

Footer Logo Lumen Waymaker

Equation Solver

Enter the Equation you want to solve into the editor.

Please ensure that your password is at least 8 characters and contains each of the following:

  • a special character: @$#!%*?&

Logo for BCcampus Open Publishing

Want to create or adapt books like this? Learn more about how Pressbooks supports open publishing practices.

Chapter 3: Graphing

3.7 Numeric Word Problems

Number-based word problems can be very confusing, and it takes practice to convert a word-based sentence into a mathematical equation. The best strategy to solve these problems is to identify keywords that can be pulled out of a sentence and use them to set up an algebraic equation.

Variables that are to be solved for are often written as “a number,” “an unknown,” or “a value.”

“Equal” is generally represented by the words “is,” “was,” “will be,” or “are.”

Addition is often stated as “more than,” “the sum of,” “added to,” “increased by,” “plus,” “all,” or “total.” Addition statements are quite often written backwards. An example of this is “three more than an unknown number,” which is written as [latex]x + 3.[/latex]

Subtraction is often written as “less than,” “minus,” “decreased by,” “reduced by,” “subtracted from,” or “the difference of.” Subtraction statements are quite often written backwards. An example of this is “three less than an unknown number,” which is written as [latex]x - 3.[/latex]

Multiplication can be seen in written problems with the words “times,” “the product of,” or “multiplied by.”

Division is generally found by a statement such as “divided by,” “the quotient of,” or “per.”

Example 3.7.1

28 less than five times a certain number is 232. What is the number?

  • 28 less means that it is subtracted from the unknown number (write this as −28)
  • five times an unknown number is written as [latex]5x[/latex]
  • is 232 means it equals 232 (write this as = 232)

Putting these pieces together and solving gives:

[latex]\begin{array}{rrrrrr} 5x&-&28&=&232& \\ &+&28&&+28& \\ \hline &&5x&=&260& \\ \\ &&x&=&\dfrac{260}{5}&\text{or }52 \end{array}[/latex]

Example 3.7.2

Fifteen more than three times a number is the same as nine less than six times the number. What is the number?

  • Fifteen more than three times a number is [latex]3x + 15[/latex] or [latex]15 + 3x[/latex]
  • nine less than six times the number is [latex]6x-9[/latex]

Putting these parts together gives:

[latex]\begin{array}{rrrrrrr} 3x&+&15&=&6x&-&9 \\ -6x&-&15&=&-6x&-&15 \\ \hline &&-3x&=&-24&& \\ \\ &&x&=&\dfrac{-24}{-3}&\text{or }8& \\ \end{array}[/latex]

Another type of number problem involves consecutive integers, consecutive odd integers, or consecutive even integers. Consecutive integers are numbers that come one after the other, such as 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. The equation that relates consecutive integers is:

[latex]x, x + 1, x + 2, x + 3, x + 4[/latex]

Consecutive odd integers and consecutive even integers both share the same equation, since every second number must be skipped to remain either odd (such as 3, 5, 7, 9) or even (2, 4, 6, 8). The equation that is used to represent consecutive odd or even integers is:

[latex]x, x + 2, x + 4, x + 6, x + 8[/latex]

Example 3.7.3

The sum of three consecutive integers is 93. What are the integers?

The relationships described in equation form are as follows:

[latex]x + x + 1 + x + 2 = 93[/latex]

Which reduces to:

[latex]\begin{array}{rrrrrr} 3x&+&3&=&93& \\ &-&3&&-3& \\ \hline &&3x&=&90& \\ \\ &&x&=&\dfrac{90}{3}&\text{or }30 \\ \end{array}[/latex]

This means that the three consecutive integers are 30, 31, and 32.

Example 3.7.4

The sum of three consecutive even integers is 246. What are the integers?

[latex]x + x + 2 + x + 4 = 246[/latex]

[latex]\begin{array}{rrrrrr} 3x&+&6&=&246& \\ &-&6&&-6& \\ \hline &&3x&=&240& \\ \\ &&x&=&\dfrac{240}{3}&\text{ or }80 \\ \end{array}[/latex]

This means that the three consecutive even integers are 80, 82, and 84.

For questions 1 to 8, write the formula defining each relationship. Do not solve.

  • Five more than twice an unknown number is 25.
  • Twelve more than 4 times an unknown number is 36.
  • Three times an unknown number decreased by 8 is 22.
  • Six times an unknown number less 8 is 22.
  • When an unknown number is decreased by 8, the difference is half the unknown number.
  • When an unknown number is decreased by 4, the difference is half the unknown number.
  • The sum of three consecutive integers is 21.
  • The sum of the first two of three odd consecutive integers, less the third, is 5.

For questions 9 to 16, write and solve the equation describing each relationship.

  • When five is added to three times a certain number, the result is 17. What is the number?
  • If five is subtracted from three times a certain number, the result is 10. What is the number?
  • Sixty more than nine times a number is the same as two less than ten times the number. What is the number?
  • Eleven less than seven times a number is five more than six times the number. Find the number.
  • The sum of three consecutive integers is 108. What are the integers?
  • The sum of three consecutive integers is −126. What are the integers?
  • Find three consecutive integers such that the sum of the first, twice the second, and three times the third is −76.
  • Find three consecutive odd integers such that the sum of the first, two times the second, and three times the third is 70.

Answer Key 3.7

Intermediate Algebra by Terrance Berg is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License , except where otherwise noted.

Solver Title

Practice

Generating PDF...

  • Pre Algebra Order of Operations Factors & Primes Fractions Long Arithmetic Decimals Exponents & Radicals Ratios & Proportions Percent Modulo Number Line Mean, Median & Mode
  • Algebra Equations Inequalities System of Equations System of Inequalities Basic Operations Algebraic Properties Partial Fractions Polynomials Rational Expressions Sequences Power Sums Interval Notation Pi (Product) Notation Induction Logical Sets Word Problems
  • Pre Calculus Equations Inequalities Scientific Calculator Scientific Notation Arithmetics Complex Numbers Polar/Cartesian Simultaneous Equations System of Inequalities Polynomials Rationales Functions Arithmetic & Comp. Coordinate Geometry Plane Geometry Solid Geometry Conic Sections Trigonometry
  • Calculus Derivatives Derivative Applications Limits Integrals Integral Applications Integral Approximation Series ODE Multivariable Calculus Laplace Transform Taylor/Maclaurin Series Fourier Series Fourier Transform
  • Functions Line Equations Functions Arithmetic & Comp. Conic Sections Transformation
  • Linear Algebra Matrices Vectors
  • Trigonometry Identities Proving Identities Trig Equations Trig Inequalities Evaluate Functions Simplify
  • Statistics Mean Geometric Mean Quadratic Mean Average Median Mode Order Minimum Maximum Probability Mid-Range Range Standard Deviation Variance Lower Quartile Upper Quartile Interquartile Range Midhinge Standard Normal Distribution
  • Physics Mechanics
  • Chemistry Chemical Reactions Chemical Properties
  • Finance Simple Interest Compound Interest Present Value Future Value
  • Economics Point of Diminishing Return
  • Conversions Radical to Exponent Exponent to Radical To Fraction To Decimal To Mixed Number To Improper Fraction Radians to Degrees Degrees to Radians Hexadecimal Scientific Notation Distance Weight Time
  • Pre Algebra
  • One-Step Addition
  • One-Step Subtraction
  • One-Step Multiplication
  • One-Step Division
  • One-Step Decimals
  • Two-Step Integers
  • Two-Step Add/Subtract
  • Two-Step Multiply/Divide
  • Two-Step Fractions
  • Two-Step Decimals
  • Multi-Step Integers
  • Multi-Step with Parentheses
  • Multi-Step Rational
  • Multi-Step Fractions
  • Multi-Step Decimals
  • Solve by Factoring
  • Completing the Square
  • Quadratic Formula
  • Biquadratic
  • Logarithmic
  • Exponential
  • Rational Roots
  • Floor/Ceiling
  • Equation Given Roots
  • Newton Raphson
  • Substitution
  • Elimination
  • Cramer's Rule
  • Gaussian Elimination
  • System of Inequalities
  • Perfect Squares
  • Difference of Squares
  • Difference of Cubes
  • Sum of Cubes
  • Polynomials
  • Distributive Property
  • FOIL method
  • Perfect Cubes
  • Binomial Expansion
  • Negative Rule
  • Product Rule
  • Quotient Rule
  • Expand Power Rule
  • Fraction Exponent
  • Exponent Rules
  • Exponential Form
  • Logarithmic Form
  • Absolute Value
  • Rational Number
  • Powers of i
  • Partial Fractions
  • Is Polynomial
  • Leading Coefficient
  • Leading Term
  • Standard Form
  • Complete the Square
  • Synthetic Division
  • Linear Factors
  • Rationalize Denominator
  • Rationalize Numerator
  • Identify Type
  • Convergence
  • Interval Notation
  • Pi (Product) Notation
  • Boolean Algebra
  • Truth Table
  • Mutual Exclusive
  • Cardinality
  • Caretesian Product
  • Age Problems
  • Distance Problems
  • Cost Problems
  • Investment Problems
  • Number Problems
  • Percent Problems
  • Addition/Subtraction
  • Multiplication/Division
  • Dice Problems
  • Coin Problems
  • Card Problems
  • Pre Calculus
  • Linear Algebra
  • Trigonometry
  • Conversions

Click to reveal more operations

Most Used Actions

Number line.

  • x^4-5x^2+4=0
  • \sqrt{x-1}-x=-7
  • \left|3x+1\right|=4
  • \log _2(x+1)=\log _3(27)
  • 3^x=9^{x+5}
  • What is the completing square method?
  • Completing the square method is a technique for find the solutions of a quadratic equation of the form ax^2 + bx + c = 0. This method involves completing the square of the quadratic expression to the form (x + d)^2 = e, where d and e are constants.
  • What is the golden rule for solving equations?
  • The golden rule for solving equations is to keep both sides of the equation balanced so that they are always equal.
  • How do you simplify equations?
  • To simplify equations, combine like terms, remove parethesis, use the order of operations.
  • How do you solve linear equations?
  • To solve a linear equation, get the variable on one side of the equation by using inverse operations.

equation-calculator

  • High School Math Solutions – Exponential Equation Calculator Solving exponential equations is pretty straightforward; there are basically two techniques: <ul> If the exponents... Read More

Please add a message.

Message received. Thanks for the feedback.

IMAGES

  1. 4th Grade Math Worksheets: Reading, Writing and Rounding BIG Numbers

    solve these math problems write out the numbers

  2. easy division and are here too note the tests have 100 problems basic

    solve these math problems write out the numbers

  3. writing two step equation word problems

    solve these math problems write out the numbers

  4. How to Solve a Wordy Math Problem (with Pictures)

    solve these math problems write out the numbers

  5. Solving Linear Equations Word Problems Worksheet

    solve these math problems write out the numbers

  6. Hard Multiplication 2-Digit Problems

    solve these math problems write out the numbers

VIDEO

  1. How To Solve Math Problems

  2. Math Olympiad Exponential

  3. How to Solve This Math Problem?

  4. how to solve maths problems quickly

  5. Nice Square Root Problem

  6. Steps to solve a math word problem #maths #mathsday

COMMENTS

  1. Mathway

    Free math problem solver answers your algebra homework questions with step-by-step explanations.

  2. Microsoft Math Solver

    Online math solver with free step by step solutions to algebra, calculus, and other math problems. Get help on the web or with our math app.

  3. Step-by-Step Calculator

    To solve math problems step-by-step start by reading the problem carefully and understand what you are being asked to find. Next, identify the relevant information, define the variables, and plan a strategy for solving the problem.

  4. Number Problems Calculator

    Free Number Problems Calculator - solve number word problems step by step

  5. Solve

    Online math solver with free step by step solutions to algebra, calculus, and other math problems. Get help on the web or with our math app. ... Type a math problem. Type a math problem. Solve. Examples. Quadratic equation { x } ^ { 2 } - 4 x - 5 = 0. Trigonometry. 4 \sin \theta \cos \theta = 2 \sin \theta ...

  6. Step-by-Step Math Problem Solver

    What can QuickMath do? QuickMath will automatically answer the most common problems in algebra, equations and calculus faced by high-school and college students. The algebra section allows you to expand, factor or simplify virtually any expression you choose.

  7. Math Problem Solver and Calculator

    Powers and roots 1 Simplify: \sqrt {36} 36 See answer › Fraction Simplify: \frac {3} {10}+\frac {6} {10} 103 + 106 See answer › Linear equations 1 Solve for x: 4x=3 4x= 3 See answer › Linear equations 2 Solve for x: \frac {2x} {3}+5= x-\frac {9} {2} 32x +5 = x− 29 See answer ›

  8. Math Calculator

    Step 1: Enter the expression you want to evaluate. The Math Calculator will evaluate your problem down to a final solution. You can also add, subtraction, multiply, and divide and complete any arithmetic you need. Step 2: Click the blue arrow to submit and see your result!

  9. What are "number" word problems? How are they solved?

    2nd number: n + 1 I know that I'm supposed to add these two numbers, and that the result will be (in other words, I should set the sum equal to) 15. This, along with my translation skills, allows me to create an equation, being the algebraic equivalent to " (this number) added to (the next number) is (fifteen)": n + ( n + 1) = 15

  10. Lesson 1. Add and subtract Flashcards

    Study with Quizlet and memorize flashcards containing terms like 2+15=17, 20-1=19, 5+7=12 and more.

  11. 3.11: Problem Bank

    Don't translate to base 10 and then calculate there — try to work in base four. Make a base five multiplication table. Use the table to solve these subtraction problems. 11five ÷ 2five 22five ÷ 3five 13five ÷ 4five. Here is a true fact in base five: 2five ⋅ 3five = 11five Write the rest of this four fact family.

  12. Symbolab Math Calculator

    Symbolab, Making Math Simpler. Word Problems. Provide step-by-step solutions to math word problems. Graphing. Plot and analyze functions and equations with detailed steps. Geometry. Solve geometry problems, proofs, and draw geometric shapes. Math Help Tailored For You.

  13. Missing numbers in addition and subtraction

    Or another way to think about it is 36 plus 41 is going to be equal to blank. You could draw this on a number line. If these two statements being the same doesn't make full sense, you do a number line right over here. And then they're saying, "OK, "we're gonna start at some mystery number. "We're starting at some mystery number. "That's our blank.

  14. Sums of consecutive integers (video)

    Sal needed to find 4 odd consecutive integers, so he extended the pattern out to x+6. Then, apply the math described in the word problem to set up an equation. Sal's problem, asked for the sum of the numbers, so his equation became adding the 4 unknown consecutive odd integers. Hope this helps.

  15. Using a Problem-Solving Strategy to Solve Number Problems

    Now we will translate and solve number problems. In number problems, you are given some clues about one or more numbers, and you use these clues to build an equation. Number problems don't usually arise on an everyday basis, but they provide a good introduction to practicing the Problem-Solving Strategy.

  16. Algebra Calculator

    How do you solve algebraic expressions? To solve an algebraic expression, simplify the expression by combining like terms, isolate the variable on one side of the equation by using inverse operations. Then, solve the equation by finding the value of the variable that makes the equation true.

  17. Equation Solver

    Step 1: Enter the Equation you want to solve into the editor. The equation calculator allows you to take a simple or complex equation and solve by best method possible. Step 2: Click the blue arrow to submit and see the result! The equation solver allows you to enter your problem and solve the equation to see the result.

  18. 3.7 Numeric Word Problems

    3.7 Numeric Word Problems. Number-based word problems can be very confusing, and it takes practice to convert a word-based sentence into a mathematical equation. The best strategy to solve these problems is to identify keywords that can be pulled out of a sentence and use them to set up an algebraic equation. Variables that are to be solved for ...

  19. Resolver: Fill in the blanks Activity Vol textbook ...

    Study with Quizlet and memorize flashcards containing terms like 1.000 + 753 =, 1.000.000 - 30.000 =, 10.000 + 555 = and more.

  20. Lección 1:2 Numbers 0-30 Flashcards

    Study with Quizlet and memorize flashcards containing terms like ¡Inténtalo! Fill in the blanks with the Spanish word for each number. 7:_____, ¡Inténtalo! Fill in the blanks with the Spanish word for each number. 16:_____, ¡Inténtalo! Fill in the blanks with the Spanish word for each number. 29:_____ and more.

  21. Estructura 1.2

    Solve the math problems and fill in the blanks with the Spanish words for the numbers. Follow the model.

  22. Equation Calculator

    Completing the square method is a technique for find the solutions of a quadratic equation of the form ax^2 + bx + c = 0. This method involves completing the square of the quadratic expression to the form (x + d)^2 = e, where d and e are constants.