Problem-Solving Flowchart: A Visual Method to Find Perfect Solutions

Lucid Content

Reading time: about 7 min

“People ask me questions Lost in confusion Well, I tell them there's no problem Only solutions” —John Lennon, “Watching the Wheels”

Despite John Lennon’s lyrics, nobody is free from problems, and that’s especially true in business. Chances are that you encounter some kind of problem at work nearly every day, and maybe you’ve had to “put out a fire” before lunchtime once or twice in your career.

But perhaps what Lennon’s saying is that, no matter what comes our way, we can find solutions. How do you approach problems? Do you have a process in place to ensure that you and your co-workers come to the right solution?

In this article, we will give you some tips on how to find solutions visually through a problem-solving flowchart and other methods.

What is visual problem-solving?

If you are a literal thinker, you may think that visual problem-solving is something that your ophthalmologist does when your vision is blurry. For the rest of us, visual problem-solving involves executing the following steps in a visual way:

  • Define the problem.
  • Brainstorm solutions.
  • Pick a solution.
  • Implement solutions.
  • Review the results.

How to make your problem-solving process more visual

Words pack a lot of power and are very important to how we communicate on a daily basis. Using words alone, you can brainstorm, organize data, identify problems, and come up with possible solutions. The way you write your ideas may make sense to you, but it may not be as easy for other team members to follow.

When you use flowcharts, diagrams, mind maps, and other visuals, the information is easier to digest. Your eyes dart around the page quickly gathering information, more fully engaging your brain to find patterns and make sense of the data.

Identify the problem with mind maps

So you know there is a problem that needs to be solved. Do you know what that problem is? Is there only one problem? Is the problem sum total of a bunch of smaller problems?

You need to ask these kinds of questions to be sure that you are working on the root of the issue. You don’t want to spend too much time and energy solving the wrong problem.

To help you identify the problem, use a mind map. Mind maps can help you visually brainstorm and collect ideas without a strict organization or structure. A mind map more closely aligns with the way a lot of our brains work—participants can bounce from one thought to the next defining the relationships as they go.

basic mind map

Mind mapping to solve a problem includes, but is not limited to, these relatively easy steps:

  • In the center of the page, add your main idea or concept (in this case, the problem).
  • Branch out from the center with possible root causes of the issue. Connect each cause to the central idea.
  • Branch out from each of the subtopics with examples or additional details about the possible cause. As you add more information, make sure you are keeping the most important ideas closer to the main idea in the center.
  • Use different colors, diagrams, and shapes to organize the different levels of thought.

Alternatively, you could use mind maps to brainstorm solutions once you discover the root cause. Search through Lucidchart’s mind maps template library or add the mind map shape library to quickly start your own mind map.

Create a problem-solving flowchart

A mind map is generally a good tool for non-linear thinkers. However, if you are a linear thinker—a person who thinks in terms of step-by-step progression making a flowchart may work better for your problem-solving strategy. A flowchart is a graphical representation of a workflow or process with various shapes connected by arrows representing each step.

Whether you are trying to solve a simple or complex problem, the steps you take to solve that problem with a flowchart are easy and straightforward. Using boxes and other shapes to represent steps, you connect the shapes with arrows that will take you down different paths until you find the logical solution at the end.

project development decision tree

Flowcharts or decision trees are best used to solve problems or answer questions that are likely to come up multiple times. For example, Yoder Lumber , a family-owned hardwood manufacturer, built decision trees in Lucidchart to demonstrate what employees should do in the case of an injury.

To start your problem-solving flowchart, follow these steps:

  • Draw a starting shape to state your problem.
  • Draw a decision shape where you can ask questions that will give you yes-or-no answers.
  • Based on the yes-or-no answers, draw arrows connecting the possible paths you can take to work through the steps and individual processes.
  • Continue following paths and asking questions until you reach a logical solution to the stated problem.
  • Try the solution. If it works, you’re done. If it doesn’t work, review the flowchart to analyze what may have gone wrong and rework the flowchart until you find the solution that works.

If your problem involves a process or workflow , you can also use flowcharts to visualize the current state of your process to find the bottleneck or problem that’s costing your company time and money.

manufacturing flow example

Lucidchart has a large library of flowchart templates to help you analyze, design, and document problem-solving processes or any other type of procedure you can think of.

Draw a cause-and-effect diagram

A cause-and-effect diagram is used to analyze the relationship between an event or problem and the reason it happened. There is not always just one underlying cause of a problem, so this visual method can help you think through different potential causes and pinpoint the actual cause of a stated problem.

Cause-and-effect diagrams, created by Kaoru Ishikawa, are also known as Ishikawa diagrams, fishbone diagrams , or herringbone diagrams (because they resemble a fishbone when completed). By organizing causes and effects into smaller categories, these diagrams can be used to examine why things went wrong or might go wrong.

cause-and-effect diagram example

To perform a cause-and-effect analysis, follow these steps.

1. Start with a problem statement.

The problem statement is usually placed in a box or another shape at the far right of your page. Draw a horizontal line, called a “spine” or “backbone,” along the center of the page pointing to your problem statement.

2. Add the categories that represent possible causes.

For example, the category “Materials” may contain causes such as “poor quality,” “too expensive,” and “low inventory.” Draw angled lines (or “bones”) that branch out from the spine to these categories.

3. Add causes to each category.

Draw as many branches as you need to brainstorm the causes that belong in each category.

Like all visuals and diagrams, a cause-and-effect diagram can be as simple or as complex as you need it to be to help you analyze operations and other factors to identify causes related to undesired effects.

Collaborate with Lucidchart

You may have superior problem-solving skills, but that does not mean that you have to solve problems alone. The visual strategies above can help you engage the rest of your team. The more involved the team is in the creation of your visual problem-solving narrative, the more willing they will be to take ownership of the process and the more invested they will be in its outcome.

In Lucidchart, you can simply share the documents with the team members you want to be involved in the problem-solving process. It doesn’t matter where these people are located because Lucidchart documents can be accessed at any time from anywhere in the world.

Whatever method you decide to use to solve problems, work with Lucidchart to create the documents you need. Sign up for a free account today and start diagramming in minutes.

Lucidchart, a cloud-based intelligent diagramming application, is a core component of Lucid Software's Visual Collaboration Suite. This intuitive, cloud-based solution empowers teams to collaborate in real-time to build flowcharts, mockups, UML diagrams, customer journey maps, and more. Lucidchart propels teams forward to build the future faster. Lucid is proud to serve top businesses around the world, including customers such as Google, GE, and NBC Universal, and 99% of the Fortune 500. Lucid partners with industry leaders, including Google, Atlassian, and Microsoft. Since its founding, Lucid has received numerous awards for its products, business, and workplace culture. For more information, visit lucidchart.com.

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Free Editable Problem and Solution Graphic Organizer Examples

Problem and solution diagrams are useful tools that can be used in order to describe an issue or problem along with proposed steps for its elimination as well as a final solution at the end. If you are looking to understand more about problem and solution graphic organizers , keep on reading till the end. In this post, we are going to touch up some base concepts about these organizers while explaining some examples along the way.

1. What is a Problem and Solution Graphic Organizer

In summation, a problem and solution graphic organizer is defined as a graphical representation of a problem-solving process. The diagram involves writing the essence of the problem in the beginning, then suggesting steps for resolving it, and finally coming up with a solution. By using these diagrams, it becomes easy for a person or team to organize the relevant information into an easily perusable and understandable form.

The reason why problem and solution diagrams are so important is that they are easy to read and present. Should an organization face a problem or issue, the relevant team or department can come up with a simple and straightforward graphic organizer that depicts the best route forward while enumerating the steps necessary for taking that certain route.

If there is any modification that needs to be made with a certain aspect of the solution, it can be easily done so since every step will be separately and clearly mentioned.

2. The Problem and Solution Graphic Organizer Examples

Problem and solutions graphic organizers are used for depicting the steps needed for reconciliation when a certain problem arises. If two or more parties are involved in the resolution of any issue, it is important for them to be on the same level of understanding. Similarly, if there is a large organization and there are a lot of people who need to take part in solving the problem, it is essential that each one of them knows and understands what the issue is, what the steps are that are needed for the resolution and what the final solution will be. By using a problem and solution graphic organizer , you can delegate that knowledge and teach a large number of people the protocol that needs to be followed when solving a problem. The graphic organizer can be presented at a meeting or it can be individually given to each of the involved personnel.

Here are some examples of problem and solution diagrams:

Example 1: Problem and Solution Graphic Organizer

This graphic organizer depicts a simple problem and solution layout. In this example, the problem is shown at the top of the page and it is divided into three sections viz. ‘Who?’, ‘What?’ and ‘Why?’

The benefit of this segregation is that it not only helps the user to define the problem, but it also enables them to describe who the problem pertains to, what the problem actually is and why the problem surfaced. The simple method would be to mention the problem all in one go but dividing them like this gives greater clarity into the matter.

Then comes the ‘Possible Solutions’ section. This is where all possible solutions to the problem are discussed and brainstorming is done. After that, the selected/most suitable solution is delineated in the last section.

Problem and Solution Graphic Organizer

Example 2: Weekly Problem and Solution Graphic Organizer

In this example, the layout is a little different. This organizer depicts a problem-solving sheet for five days of a week viz. from Monday to Friday. Each day has three columns in front of it which are for "Rough Work/Drawing", "Sum/Number Sentence" and "Answer" respectively. Instead of focusing on a problem and giving a solution to it (as was the case in the previous example), this organizer features a set of columns and rows designed for students to help with their weekly problem-solving. This is namely an activity sheet for kids rather than an actual problem-solving diagram that can be officially used etc. This template can be useful to accomplish something similar to what it is made for i.e. learning and teaching, but it is not suitable for using to depict a certain problem and its solution.

Weekly Problem and Solution Graphic Organizer

Example 3: Problem & Solution Graphic Organizer

The Problem & Solution Graphic Organizer features a simple problem-solving structure. In this diagram, three boxes on the left are made for the problems while three boxes adjacent to them are for their respective solutions. This design does not have the sequence where the problem first appears followed by the steps of resolution and then the solution. Here, three problems are simultaneously listed with their solutions written directly beside them without any ‘Possible Solutions’ section or steps for resolution.

This sort of graphic organizer can be useful in circumstances where a multitude of problems have arisen at the same time and need to be dealt with swiftly. In such an instance, listing possible alternatives or steps can be arduous, and simply writing the solutions can be much easier.

Problem & Solution Graphic Organizer

Example 4: Problem Solution Graphic Organizer

This example features an unusual layout that can be used for problem-solving. Instead of listing the problem, the steps/possible solutions, and then lastly the solution, this example first mentions the problem and then three 'Goals' in the form of 'Event # 1, 2, and 3'. In the 'Event' spaces, you can put in the outcomes you require or the situations you need to find yourself in after resolving the problem. Hence, you would be enumerating the goals you need to achieve by solving the problem.

After the ‘Goals’, the ‘Resolution’ section is given. In this section, one could write the actual steps or procedure that needs to be followed to meet the above ‘Goals’. This template can be more suitable for intricate issues rather than simple problems that require a one-line solution.

Problem Solution Graphic Organizer

Example 5: Problem and Solution Graphic Organizer Example

In this example, a very practical and useful approach is used. As we saw before, enumeration of possible solutions is useful for brainstorming and selecting the best one of the lot. This example makes it really easy and simple to compare alternative solutions. It first depicts the problem at the start of the page. Then, three choices are listed underneath the problem. For each choice, a ‘Pros/Cons’ list is given. Finally, in the end, there is a 'Solution' section where you can write the choice you selected and why it is the best one.

By listing the pros and cons of each choice, it can be established which route or plan of action is the most suited and beneficial. The choice which has the most pros and least number of cons can be easily selected.

Problem and Solution Graphic Organizer Example

Example 6: Problem and Solution Graphic Organizer PDF

This graphic organizer is labeled 'Compare and Contrast'. In this example, there are two different sets of problems and solutions. Each set starts off with the 'Text', succeeded by the 'Problem' and then the solution.

In each of the sets, the problem can be described along with the suggested solution. Being two, these problems and solutions can be compared with each other. This sort of graphic organizer can be suitable for specific situations which involve the comparison and matching of more than one problem/solution. This template can also be used to match the alternate solutions to a single problem but the problem part in both sections would have to be identical.

Problem and Solution Graphic Organizer PDF

Example 7: Problem and Solution Worksheets

The next example on our list is the Problem and Solution Worksheet. The worksheet is an activity for students and is not exactly a template that can be used freely for any other situation, circumstance, or problem. In this worksheet, there are four sections, each of which contains a certain scenario. In each section, the problem is required and then the solution.

This activity is beneficial for teaching children about problem and solution organizers and the basics of problem-solving. Although the scenario in each section has been explicitly mentioned, it is still required of the students to point out which part is the problem and which part is the solution. This improves their identification skills.

Problem and Solution Worksheets

Example 8: Problem and Solution Reading Comprehension Worksheet

This worksheet is also a suitable example to include in this list. The purpose of this worksheet is to tell students to find problems or issues in the story’s character and to list those issues along with their possible solutions.

Albeit with specific instruction, this worksheet also falls in the category of problem and solution graphic organizers. There are three different problems that need to be identified. Three solutions need to be given for each respective problem.

This example has a simple layout unlike some of the more complicated ones we have seen on this list. The worksheet simply requires the students to point out the problem and to suggest a solution. No alternatives are explored, nor are any pros and cons mentioned.

Problem and Solution Reading Comprehension Worksheet

Example 9: Story Elements - Problem and Solution worksheet

This worksheet does not fall in the strict category of graphic organizers. This is a class activity that requires the student to match the problems to suitable solutions. In this example, the problems are given on the left hand and the solutions are given on the right. The solutions and problems are written all jumbled up and are not written adjacent to one another.

This sort of worksheet can be a useful tool in teaching kids the concept behind problem-solving. This example can be a stepping stone using which the students can, later on, realize how they have to present a solution to any problem that they face.

Story Elements - Problem and Solution worksheet

3. Online Problem and Solution Graphic Organizer Maker

Now that we have some idea of what these organizers are, let’s get to the part where we actually make one. If you are looking to make an organizer similar to the examples we saw above, simply head over to EdrawMax Online . At EdrawMax Online, there is a large variety of charts, drawings, and diagrams that you can make. The software is totally online, and it has a user-friendly interface. Shapes can be added from the library by simply dragging them over to the desired spot on the canvas. If you don’t want to make a layout from scratch, you can go to the template gallery and pick a pre-made organizer to edit as your own.

EdrawMax Online

4. Key Takeaways

Problem and Solution Graphic Organizers are great tools that you can use for problem-solving. By mentioning the problem at hand, the steps needed for its resolution, and the selected solution, you can come up with a clear and concise representation of a problem-solving process. EdrawMax Online is your go-to place for making diagrams, drawings, and graphic organizers. The software is cloud-based and offline use available, free, and easy to use and it can convert your file into your desired format. You can find out more graphic organizer examples in the Template Gallery.

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Blog Business

What is a Problem-Solving Flowchart & How to Make One

By Danesh Ramuthi , Aug 10, 2023

What is A Problem Solving Flowchart

Problem-Solving Flowcharts, contrary to what many believe aren’t just aesthetic wonders — they’re almost like magical blueprints for troubleshooting those pesky problems that many of us face.

Flowcharts take business challenges and turn them into a navigable pathway. In this post, I will guide you on key aspects of problem-solving flowcharts such as what it is, the advantages of problem-solving flowcharts, how to create one and more.

Besides, you’ll also discover how to create problem-solving flowcharts with the help of Venngage’s Flowchart Maker.

And for those of you thinking, “I’m no designer, how can I create one?” worry not! I’ve got you covered. Just hop on Venggage’s Flowchart Templates and you’ll be charting your way to problem-solving glory in no time.

Click to jump ahead:

What are problem-solving flowcharts?

When to use problem-solving flowcharts, what are the advantages of flowcharts in problem-solving, what are the 7 steps of problem-solving flowcharts.

  • 5 different types of problem-solving flowcharts

Best practices for designing effective problem-solving flowcharts

How to make a flowchart using venngage , problem-solving flowcharts faqs.

  • Final Thoughts

Problem-Solving Flowcharts is a graphical representation used to break down problem or process into smaller, manageable parts, identify the root causes and outline a step-by-step solution. 

It helps in visually organizing information and showing the relationships between various parts of the problem.

This type of flowcharts consists of different symbols and arrows, each representing different components or steps in the problem-solving process. 

By following the flow of the chart, individuals or teams can methodically approach problem, analyze different aspects of it and come to a well-informed solution.

Problem Agitate Solution Flow Chart Template

Problem-Solving Flowcharts is a versatile tool that can be used in various scenarios. Here’s when to consider utilizing one:

  • Complex Problems: When faced with a multifaceted issue that involves multiple steps or variables, flowcharts can help break down the complexity into digestible parts.
  • Team Collaboration: If you’re working with a team and need a common understanding of problem and its potential solutions then a flowchart provides a visual that everyone can refer to.
  • Analyzing Processes: In a situation where you need to understand a particular process, whether it’s within a project or a part of regular operations then mapping it out in a flowchart can offer clarity.
  • Decision Making: When various paths or decisions might be taken, a flowchart can outline the potential outcomes of each aiding in making an informed choice.
  • Training and Onboarding: Flowcharts can be used in training materials to help new employees understand complex processes or procedures which makes the learning curve smoother.
  • Identifying Root Causes: If you’re looking to identify the underlying causes of problem then a flowchart can facilitate a systematic approach to reaching the root of the issue.

Related: How to Use Fishbone Diagrams to Solve Complex Problems

Problem-solving flowcharts can offer several benefits to the users who are looking to solve a particular problem. Few advantages of flowcharts in problem solving are: 

Visual Clarity

When you’re dealing with multifaceted problems or processes, words alone can make the situation seem even more tangled. Flowcharts distill these complexities into easily understandable visual elements. 

By mapping out each phase or component of problem, flowcharts offer a bird’s eye view enabling individuals to grasp the bigger picture and the finer details simultaneously.

Sequential Representation

Flowcharts excel in laying out the sequence of events or actions. By indicating a clear starting point and illustrating each subsequent step, they guide users through a process or solution path methodically. 

This linear representation ensures that no step is overlooked and each is executed in the right order.  

Collaboration

Problem-solving often requires team effort and flowcharts are instrumental in fostering collaborative environments. 

When a team is discussing potential solutions or trying to understand problem’s intricacies, a flowchart serves as a collective reference point. 

It aids in synchronizing everyone’s understanding, minimizing miscommunications and promoting constructive discussions. 

Website User Flow Diagram

1. Define the Problem  

Before anything else, it’s essential to articulate the problem or task you want to solve clearly and accurately. By understanding exactly what needs to be addressed you can ensure that subsequent steps align with the core issue.

2. Identify the Inputs and Outputs  

Determine what inputs (such as data, information or resources) will be required to solve the problem and what the desired outputs or outcomes are. Identifying these factors will guide you in structuring the steps needed to reach the end goal and ensure that all necessary resources are at hand.

3. Identify the Main Steps  

Break down the problem-solving process into its main steps or subtasks. This involves pinpointing the essential actions or stages necessary to reach the solution. Create a roadmap that helps in understanding how to approach the problem methodically.

4. Use Decision Symbols  

In problem-solving, decisions often lead to different paths or outcomes. Using standard symbols to represent these decision points in the flowcharts allows for a clear understanding of these critical junctures. It helps visually present various scenarios and their consequences.

5. Add Descriptions and Details  

A well-designed flowcharts is concise but clear in its labeling. Using arrows and short, descriptive phrases to explain what happens at each step or decision point ensures that the flowcharts communicates the process without unnecessary complexity. 

6. Revise and Refine  

Creating a flowcharts is not always a one-and-done process. It may require revisions to improve its clarity, accuracy or comprehensiveness. Necessary refinement ensures that the flowcharts precisely reflects the problem-solving process and is free from errors or ambiguities.

7. Use Flowchart Tool  

While it’s possible to draw a flowcharts manually, using a flowcharts tool like Venngage’s Flowchart Maker and Venngage’s Flowchart Templates can make the process more efficient and flexible. These tools come with pre-designed templates and intuitive interfaces that make it easy to create, modify and share flowcharts. 

Root Cause Analysis Flow Chart

5 different types of problem-solving flowcharts 

Let’s have a look at 5 most common types of flowcharts that individuals and organizations often use. 

1. Process Flowchart s

A process flowcharts is a visual representation of the sequence of steps and decisions involved in executing a particular process or procedure. 

It serves as a blueprint that showcases how different stages or functions are interconnected in a systematic flow and it highlights the direction of the process from its beginning to its end.

Proposal Process Flowchart

Process flowcharts are instrumental in training and onboarding, sales process , process optimization, documentation, recruitment and in any scenario where clear communication of a process is crucial.

Simple Recruitment Process Flowchart

2. Flowcharts Infographic 

A flowcharts infographic is a great way to showcase the process or a series of steps using a combination of graphics, icons, symbols and concise text. It aims to communicate complex information in a clear and easy-to-understand manner, making it a popular tool for conveying information, data and instructions in a visually engaging way.

Icon Competitor Process Infographic Template

For example, you can use this flowchart to illustrate a health insurance process that visually explains the steps involved from finding a provider to paying for your healthcare provider. 

Flowchart Infographic Template

3. Circular Flowcharts

A circular flowcharts is used to illustrate the flow of information, goods, services or money within a closed system or process. It gets its name from its circular shape, which emphasizes the continuous and cyclical nature of the flow. 

Marketing Life Cycle Circular Flowchart Diagram

Circular flowcharts are widely used in various fields such as economics, business, engineering and process management to help visualize and understand complex systems.

In a circular flowcharts , elements are represented using various shapes and connected with arrows to indicate the direction of flow. The circular arrangement indicates that the process is ongoing and repeats itself over time.

Quad Life Cycle Flowchart

4. Swimlane flowcharts

Swimlane flowcharts , also known as cross-functional flowcharts are a specific type of flowchart that organizes the process flow into lanes or “swimlanes.” 

Each lane represents a different participant or functional area involved in the process and the flowchart shows how activities or information move between these participants. 

Swimlane Process Flow

Swimlane flowcharts are particularly useful for illustrating complex processes that involve multiple stakeholders or departments.

In a swimlane flowcharts, the process is divided horizontally into lanes and each lane is labeled with the name of the department, person or role responsible for that part of the process. Vertically, the flowchart displays the sequence of steps or actions taken in the process.

problem solution chart example

5. Decision Flowchart s

Decision flowcharts, also known as decision trees or flow diagrams are graphical representations that illustrate the process of making decisions or solving problems. 

They are widely used in various fields such as computer science, business mapping , engineering and problem-solving scenarios. 

Vibrant Decision Flowchart Template

Decision flowcharts help break down complex decision-making processes into simple, sequential steps, making it easier to understand and follow.

A decision tree is a specialized flowchart used to visually represent the process of decision-making. 

Businesses and other individuals can employ a decision tree analysis as a tool to aid in evaluating different options and the possible consequences associated with each choice.

Decision trees Infographics can be used to create a more nuanced type of flowchart that is more informative and visually appealing by combining a decision flowchart and the flowchart infographic. 

Decision flowcharts are valuable tools for visualizing decision-making processes, analyzing complex problems and communicating them effectively to others.

Illustrative Decision Flowchart Template

Designing effective problem-solving flowcharts involves careful consideration of various factors to ensure clarity, accuracy and usability. Here are some best practices to create efficient and useful problem-solving flowcharts:

  • Understand the problem first & clearly define it
  • Keep it simple
  • Use standard & recognizable symbols
  • Ensure that the flowchart follows a logical and sequential order
  • Clearly label each decision point, action and outcome
  • Verify the flowchart’s accuracy by testing it
  • Clearly state the decision criteria that lead to different branches
  • Provide context when the flowchart is part of a larger process or system
  • Review and revise the flowchart

Creating problem-solving flowchart on Venngage is incredibly simple. All you have to do is:

  • Start by Signing Up and Creating an Account with Venngage
  • Choose a flowchart template that best suits your needs from our library.
  • Start editing your flowchart by choosing the desired shapes, labels and colors.
  • You can also enhance your flowchart by incorporating icons, illustrations or backgrounds all of which are readily available in our library.
  • Once done, you will have 2 options to choose from, either sharing it online for free or downloading your flowchart to your desktop by subscribing to the Premium or Business Plan. 

Is flowchart the representation of problem solutions?

Flowcharts are not the representation of problem solutions per se; rather, they are a visual representation of processes, decision-making steps and actions taken to arrive at a solution to problem.

What are the 3 basic structures of flowcharts?

3 Basic Structures of Flowcharts are:

  • Sequence: Simplify Complexity
  • Selection (Decision): Embrace Choices
  • Repetition (Loop): Emphasize Iteration

What are the elements of a good flowchart?

A good flowchart should exhibit clarity and simplicity, using consistent symbols and labels to depict a logical sequence of steps. It should be readable, with appropriate white space to avoid clutter while eliminating ambiguity through well-defined decision criteria and paths.

Can flowcharts be used for both simple and complex problem-solving?

Yes, flowcharts can be used for both simple and complex problem-solving scenarios. Flowcharts are versatile visual tools that can effectively represent various processes, decision-making steps and problem-solving approaches regardless of their complexity.

In both cases, flowcharts offer a systematic and visual means of organizing information, identifying potential problems and facilitating collaboration among team members.

Can problem-solving flowcharts be used in any industry or domain?

Problem-solving flowcharts can be used in virtually any industry or domain. The versatility and effectiveness of flowcharts make them applicable to a wide range of fields such as Business and Management, Software Development and IT, Healthcare, Education, Finance, Marketing & Sales and a lot more other industries. 

Final thoughts

Problem-solving flowcharts are a valuable and versatile tool that empowers individuals and teams to tackle complex problems with clarity and efficiency.

By visually representing the step-by-step process of identifying, analyzing and resolving issues, flowcharts serve as navigational guides simplifying intricate challenges into digestible parts.

With the aid of modern tools like Venngage’s Flowchart Maker and Venngage’s Flowchart Templates , designing impactful flowcharts becomes accessible to all while revolutionizing the way problems are approached and solved.

How to create a problem-solving flow chart

Problem-solving is one of those topics that we’ve often discussed on this site (check out our Problem Solving guide ). We think it’s one of  THE  vital skills of business. Why? Because you’ll come across problems every day, and you need to arm yourself with the right tools to solve them.

A problem-solving flowchart is one of those tools. It’ll help you take a problem statement, break the problem down into likely causes helping you get to the bottom of what’s gone wrong.

In this post, we’ll cover

  • What is a Problem Solving Flow Chart
  • How to create a Problem Solving flow chart
  • Example 1 of Problem Solving flow chart
  • Example 2 of Problem Solving Flow chart
  • What flow chart shapes to use
  • When should you use a flow chart
  • 7 tips on creating your Problem Solving chart

Key Benefits & Likely issues with the tool

Let’s get started!

What is a Problem Solving Flowchart

A Problem Solving flow chart is a diagram that uses shapes, arrows, and text to show a moving sequence of actions and/or activities that help solve a problem.  

How to create a Problem Solving flowchart

  • Describe your problem.
  • Pose Yes/No Questions that can help identify the cause of the problem
  • Question each stage of the process until it is fully examined
  • Repeat steps 2 & 3 until you have identified a solution
  • Try the solution; if it is successful in addressing the root cause, then you’ve fixed your problem. If not, repeat the process until you have a solution that works.

A problem-solving flowchart attempts to identify a root cause/solution to the trigger that is causing the problem allowing you to change the process and prevent the problem from occurring. 

Let’s now demonstrate the effectiveness of a problem solving flowchart by showing some examples.

Example 1 Problem solving flow chart

In our first example, we’re going to start with something simple to show you the principle of the tool.

We have been given a cup of tea and we don’t like it!  

Let’s use a problem-solving flow chart to find out what’s gone wrong.

We’ve used Excel to capture this flow chart using flowchart shapes (insert –> shapes), you can, of course, use other applications to do this, you don’t’ have to have specialized flow chart software to do this. ( there’s a great flowchart in Excel video here ). Or you can simply use a pen and paper.

Use a rectangle and add your problem statement.

Remember to keep your problem statement unambiguous and straightforward. Here we’ve used “I don’t like my cup of tea.”

problem solution chart example

Now that we’ve got our problem statement, we’re going to start asking questions.

We’re going to examine the variables that go into a cup of tea in an attempt to find out what’s gone wrong.

** TIP** – Work through your process – rather than start from scratch, if you have a documented process, work through that examining each step to ascertain if there are issues. If not, you might find it useful to research and sketch out the process before starting with your flowchart.

We have a process for the cup of tea, which is:

1/ Boil Water

2/ Place Breakfast Tea teabag in the cup

3/ Add Water

4/ Leave to sit for 2 mins

4/ Remove teabag

5/ Add milk

6/ Add sugar

So our problem solving flow chart needs to examine each of those steps to determine where the failure has occurred. 

We’ll add a question shape (diamond), connect out problem statement to it using an arrow to check if we boiled the kettle. Our Diagram will now look like:

problem solution chart example

As a question, we want two possible routes – Yes and No.

Our process asks us to boil the kettle if we did, and the answer is Yes, then we can go to the next process step.

If the answer is No, then we have a problem. Our tea will be cold. 

Here we can do one of two things. We can terminate the flow chart, or we can add an activity to rectify the problem (this might be to remake the drink or to perhaps heat the drink up in the microwave).

Our flow chart now looks like this:

problem solution chart example

Step 2 in our Tea making process was to add a Breakfast-tea tea bag.

So, once again, we’ll ask a question about that step.

“Did we add an English Breakfast teabag.”

As before, we’ll use a question shape, using Yes or No answers. If we performed the process step correctly, we’d move on. If we didn’t, we’ll either end the problem solving (we’ve found the root cause), or we’ll add a corrective action.

Now we’ll repeat this process until we’ve reviewed the whole process.

Our finished flowchart looks like this.

problem solution chart example

However, we’re not finished.

What happens if we follow the flow chart, and we find we didn’t use boiled water. We remake the tea using boiled water, and we still don’t like it?  

We need to ask some further questions.

We need to update our flow chart to validate that we solved the problem and what to do if we didn’t.

So for each step of the process, our problem solving flowchart now looks like this.

Here’s our completed flow chart.

problem solution chart example

As you can see, we’ve identified the problem, and we’ve described a corrective action.

But there’s a problem here. With this flowchart, you can still follow it, validating the process, and still end up with a cup of tea that’s unsatisfactory. 

Why is that?

Well, it’s perfectly possible that we started out with a process that’s incorrect. What happens if the process called for using an incorrect tea bag from the start?

So we’ll simplify things by adding a block at the end that if you’re still not happy at the end of reviewing the steps, a full review of the process will be undertaken. This is a simple answer to this problem, and I would expect that you would expand this section in more detail if you were creating a flowchart yourself.

So what does a more complex process look like, how about we look at a business problem?

Example 2 Problem Solving flow chart

OK, so example 1 may have been a bit simple, and you are maybe looking for something in a business context.

So in Example 2, let’s look at a scenario that’s a little more complex.

Let’s assume that your organization has received a non-conforming part. You have been assigned to work with the Vendor to:

  • Find out what went wrong
  • Prevent recurrence

We’re going to use a problem solving flow chart to help us do that.

As with the first example, we’re going to state the problem.

“The part is non conforming.”

Using the production process from the Vendor, we’ll work through the stages to see if we can spot what’s gone wrong.

The diagram below shows an analysis of the first two steps of the production process using a problem-solving flow chart.

problem solution chart example

The first thing you’ll notice is that on one process step, there may be many questions to ascertain the potential issue.  

Some of these may be complex and require careful thought.

There may be multiple variables (systems, processes, tools, inputs, etc.) that may require attention.

You will need to analyze each process step, in full, to be sure you have caught all the possible causes of the fault.

Which Flow chart shapes should you use.

A problem solving flow chart usually utilizes only a small number of shapes. We show these in the table below.

problem solution chart example

When should you use a Problem Solving flow chart

There are many many problem tools available.

A flow chart lends itself to be used when:

  • You are looking for a tool that is simple to use
  • You are looking to use a tool that does not require complex software
  • You want to validate a  process.
  • You want something that facilitates collaboration
  • You want something that you can use to communicate with others

7 Tips on creating great problem solving flow charts

1/ Use standard shapes!

2/ Make it easy to follow!

3/ Keep things on one page

4/ Don’t overload your boxes with text

5/ Go into enough detail. Don’t try and simplify activities as it might hide problems from being seen.

6/ Collaborate. Where you can utilize a team to help document the problem and the activities do so. The more knowledge of the process, the better chance you’ll have of locating the issue.

7/ Use a consistent direction to flow your process, moving things around the page can confuse people who might look at it.

A flow chart can provide you with a great advantage when looking to solve problems. Some of the key benefits include

  • A visual aide that’s easy to understand
  • Simple to use, does not require hours and hours of training
  • A tool that facilitates collaboration
  • Effective for aiding communication
  • Provides an effective method of analysing a process

However, as with everything, there are some issues to look out for

  • Flowchart fails to capture all process steps and therefore root cause analysis is hit and miss
  • Lack of knowledge of the process by the individual compiling the flowchart results in inaccurate problem solving
  • Inconsistent flow of process makes maps confusing
  • Complex processes may be better suited to other tools (fishbone etc)
  • Inconsistent formatting and/or use of shapes result in flowchart that is difficult to utilise.

There are a great many tools out there for problem-solving, and flow charts can be used either as a stand-alone tool or conjunction with one of these other tools.

Flowcharts can make for a great problem-solving tool.  

They’re simple to use, effective, and facilitate collaboration.

We hope you’ve found our article useful, in particular the example walkthroughs.

If you’re looking to use the tool, we’d love some feedback from you and hearing how you’ve got on. Why not fire us a message on twitter or use the comments section below.

This article is part of our Problem Solving Guide.   

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Problem-Solution Chart

Create Education Worksheet examples like this template called Problem-Solution Chart that you can easily edit and customize in minutes.

Example Image: Problem-Solution Chart

Text in this Example:

Problem - Solution Chart Problem Possible Solutions Name: Date:

Problem and Solution Graphic Organizer Examples & Templates

Edraw content team, do you want to make your problem and solution graphic organizer.

EdrawMax specializes in diagramming and visualizing. Learn from this article to learn more about problem and solution graphic organizer examples and templates. Just try it free now!

Problem and solution graphic organizer is used to improve the students' problem-solving skills. It primarily assists students in identifying the problem and potential solutions. It also describes the problem's issue, the anticipated steps for its elimination, and the final solution.

If you want to learn more about the problem and solution graphic organizer , keep reading until the end of this blog post. Then, we will discuss each aspect, from its basics to the best problem-solution graphic organizer example .

problem and solution graphic organizer

1. What is a Problem and Solution Organizer

A problem solution organizer is a graphical representation of problems and solutions. The graphic includes the problem at the beginning, then the causes of this problem, suggestions for tips, and a final solution to the problem. Using these diagrams makes it easy for a person to understand the problem and solution.

In teaching, graphics organizers are easy to understand and present. Besides, this can be used in many business organizations to structure problems and solutions.

Let's see an example of a problem and solution graphic organizer in teaching.

Problem solution graphic organizer for teachers

  • Step 1 : Find the problem and write it in the problem box.
  • Step 2 : Ask students to brainstorm causes and solutions to the problem.
  • Step 3 : Once you find the perfect solution, write it down.
  • Step 4 : If you want to add suggestions, then go ahead and add a section next to solutions.

It is how you can use an example of a problem-solution graphic organizer . If you want to edit this template, click on the image to modify it.

2. 10 Problems and Solutions Graphic Organizer Examples for All Grades

A problem solution graphic organizer example is used to showcase the problem and solution of a particular case. Here we have explained the 10 problem-solving organizer examples suitable for all grades and teachers.

Example 1: Graphic Organizer: Problem Solution

Example 2: problem & solution graphic organizer, example 3: problem and solution graphic organizer, example 4: problem and solution graphic, example 5: problem solution worksheet, example 6: problem-solving model, example 7: problem and solution graphic (printable), example 8: weekly problem and solution graphics, example 9: problem and solution graphic organizer, example 10: problem solution graphic organizer.

This problem and graphic organizer example shows sections for problems, choices, and pros and cons. It is one of the best examples of problem-solving because there are numerous ways to solve it. For instance, enter the problem in the first box and add choices next to the problem. In these three choices, you have the option to list the pros and cons of each choice. After comparing all these three choices, you can reach a logical conclusion.

Graphic Organizer: Problem Solution

This problem and solution graphic organizer is a simple example that anyone can use to display problems and solutions. In this example, you can see three sections for the problem, and its solution can use to show problems and solutions. In this example, you can see three sections for the problem and its solution. Remember that the problem and solution will be written separately, with problems on the left and solutions on the right. This graphic helps students brainstorm problems and solutions. Moreover, it helps them make predictions and suggestions.

Problem & Solution Graphic Organizer

This template is used to identify the problem and potential solutions. In the first section, you can add a problem, and in the next three sections, you need to share three events that happened in the problem. After that, the diagram is about the problem, who is involved, and why it takes place. The last section is about the conclusion of the problem.

Problem and Solution Graphic Organizer

This template is designed to recognize the problem and its solutions simply. In this, mention the problem in the first section and then share three choices for the problem. Next, the choices are divided into pros and cons, and last are the conclusions. It will be brainstorming for the students.

Problem and Solution Graphic

This problem-solution worksheet is an innovative way to help students understand day-to-day life problems and solutions via engaging story elements. This worksheet is divided into two sections: problem and solution. In this case, students are required to match the problem with a solution. With this, students can develop their cognitive skills.

Problem Solution Worksheet

In this problem-solving model, you will find four steps. The first phase is determining the issue, followed by developing an actionable plan, carrying it out, and seeking a solution.

  • Students can enter keywords in the "understand the problem" area of the diagram.
  • In the second section, they can choose a method and utilize this space to organize and explain the thinking process.
  • They can include the keywords in the third part, which will help them stick to the strategy.
  • Students can carefully review the solution in the final part.

Problem-Solving Model

Students may arrange, explain, and get the answers encountered by the fictitious characters they are reading with this printable problem-solution graphic organizer. First, students must put down the issue that each character in the narrative faces in the first box and the resolution they came up with in the box below. Next, students must list the characters' steps to solve the giant box on the right side. Students are expected to describe the solution method more in-depth in this area than others.

Problem and Solution Graphic (Printable)

This weekly problem-solving example can be used to identify problems and solutions. There will be different problems with each passing day. Write a rough work or drawing, a sum or number sentence, and then an answer in the first section. This organizer is beneficial in sharing day-to-day problems and consistently presents the problem and the solution.

 Weekly Problem and Solution Graphics

This problem-solution organizer is for comparison between different situations. It consists of four sections. The first is the problem box, and the second is the text section, which is divided into problem and solution sections. Another part is for problems and solutions.

Problem and Solution Graphic Organizer

The easy-to-understand and editable problem solution graphic also falls into three categories: who, what, and why? In addition, the graphic contains two sections: problem solutions and solutions. It helps students actually to brainstorm and find the solution to the problem.

So, these are the best graphic organizers for problems and solutions. If you're looking for the best software to create these examples, then EdrawMax is the best. Here we go!

Problem Solution Graphic Organizer

BONUS: Create Problem and Solution Graphic Organizer with Wondershare EdrawMax!

Wondershare EdrawMax is one of the best tools for creating engaging and professional graphics organizers. There are unlimited templates to edit; search for them and make the most of them. Additionally, the editing process is simple and easy to understand.

Wondershare EdrawMax

3. Conclusion

You have learned all the examples of problem and solution graphic organizers. These are best for teachers to help students brainstorm their minds and develop their creative and cognitive skills. However, if you want to create or modify the templates above, go to EdrawMax .

Graphic Organizer image

Graphic Organizer Complete Guide

Check this complete guide to know everything about graphic organizer, like graphic organizer types, and how to make a graphic organizer.

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  • What Is a Fishbone Diagram? | Templates & Examples

What Is a Fishbone Diagram? | Templates & Examples

Published on January 2, 2023 by Tegan George . Revised on January 29, 2024.

A fishbone diagram is a problem-solving approach that uses a fish-shaped diagram to model possible root causes of problems and troubleshoot possible solutions. It is also called an Ishikawa diagram, after its creator, Kaoru Ishikawa, as well as a herringbone diagram or cause-and-effect diagram.

Fishbone diagrams are often used in root cause analysis , to troubleshoot issues in quality management or product development. They are also used in the fields of nursing and healthcare, or as a brainstorming and mind-mapping technique many students find helpful.

Table of contents

How to make a fishbone diagram, fishbone diagram templates, fishbone diagram examples, advantages and disadvantages of fishbone diagrams, other interesting articles, frequently asked questions about fishbone diagrams.

A fishbone diagram is easy to draw, or you can use a template for an online version.

  • Your fishbone diagram starts out with an issue or problem. This is the “head” of the fish, summarized in a few words or a small phrase.
  • Next, draw a long arrow, which serves as the fish’s backbone.
  • From here, you’ll draw the first “bones” directly from the backbone, in the shape of small diagonal lines going right-to-left. These represent the most likely or overarching causes of your problem.
  • Branching off from each of these first bones, create smaller bones containing contributing information and necessary detail.
  • When finished, your fishbone diagram should give you a wide-view idea of what the root causes of the issue you’re facing could be, allowing you to rank them or choose which could be most plausible.

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problem solution chart example

There are no built-in fishbone diagram templates in Microsoft programs, but we’ve made a few free ones for you to use that you can download below. Alternatively, you can make one yourself using the following steps:

  • In a fresh document, go to Insert > Shapes
  • Draw a long arrow from left to right, and add a text box on the right-hand side. These serve as the backbone and the head of the fish.
  • Next, add lines jutting diagonally from the backbone. These serve as the ribs, or the contributing factors to the main problem.
  • Next, add horizontal lines jutting from each central line. These serve as the potential causes of the problem.

Lastly, add text boxes to label each function.

You can try your hand at filling one in yourself using the various blank fishbone diagram templates below, in the following formats:

Fishbone diagram template Excel

Download our free Excel template below!

fishbone-template-excel

Fishbone diagram template Word

Download our free Word template below!

fishbone-template-word

Fishbone diagram template PowerPoint

Download our free PowerPoint template below!

fishbone-template-powerpoint

Fishbone diagrams are used in a variety of settings, both academic and professional. They are particularly popular in healthcare settings, particularly nursing, or in group brainstorm study sessions. In the business world, they are an often-used tool for quality assurance or human resources professionals.

Fishbone diagram example #1: Climate change

Let’s start with an everyday example: what are the main causes of climate change?

Fishbone Diagram example

Fishbone diagram example #2: Healthcare and nursing

Fishbone diagrams are often used in nursing and healthcare to diagnose patients with unclear symptoms, or to streamline processes or fix ongoing problems. For example: why have surveys shown a decrease in patient satisfaction?

Fishbone Diagram example

Fishbone diagram example #3: Quality assurance

QA professionals also use fishbone diagrams to troubleshoot usability issues, such as: why is the website down?

Fishbone Diagram example

Fishbone diagram example #4: HR

Lastly, an HR example: why are employees leaving the company?

Fishbone Diagram example

Fishbone diagrams come with advantages and disadvantages.

  • Great tool for brainstorming and mind-mapping, either individually or in a group project.
  • Can help identify causal relationships and clarify relationships between variables .
  • Constant iteration of “why” questions really drills down to root problems and elegantly simplifies even complex issues.

Disadvantages

  • Can lead to incorrect or inconsistent conclusions if the wrong assumptions are made about root causes or the wrong variables are prioritized.
  • Fishbone diagrams are best suited to short phrases or simple ideas—they can get cluttered and confusing easily.
  • Best used in the exploratory research phase, since they cannot provide true answers, only suggestions.

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If you want to know more about the research process , methodology , research bias , or statistics , make sure to check out some of our other articles with explanations and examples.

Methodology

  • Sampling methods
  • Simple random sampling
  • Stratified sampling
  • Cluster sampling
  • Likert scales
  • Reproducibility

 Statistics

  • Null hypothesis
  • Statistical power
  • Probability distribution
  • Effect size
  • Poisson distribution

Research bias

  • Optimism bias
  • Cognitive bias
  • Implicit bias
  • Hawthorne effect
  • Anchoring bias
  • Explicit bias

Fishbone diagrams have a few different names that are used interchangeably, including herringbone diagram, cause-and-effect diagram, and Ishikawa diagram.

These are all ways to refer to the same thing– a problem-solving approach that uses a fish-shaped diagram to model possible root causes of problems and troubleshoot solutions.

Fishbone diagrams (also called herringbone diagrams, cause-and-effect diagrams, and Ishikawa diagrams) are most popular in fields of quality management. They are also commonly used in nursing and healthcare, or as a brainstorming technique for students.

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Problem-Solution Chart

Create Education Worksheet examples like this template called Problem-Solution Chart that you can easily edit and customize in minutes.

Example Image: Problem-Solution Chart

Text in this Example:

Problem - Solution Chart Problem Possible Solutions Name: Date:

What’s Your Problem? Teaching Problem and Solution

Hi Friends! I am back with another post about story elements (read about character here and here )!

Watch my Facebook Live video about this topic here.

problem solution chart example

This week we were focusing on problem and solution, and my students really seemed to “get” it, so I’m excited to share our anchor charts, book ideas and activities that we used!

Here is the anchor chart that I created to help my students understand what problem and solution mean.

Problem and Solution Anchor Chart

I really wanted my students to understand that the problem and solution must fit together like a puzzle. We emphasized that all week long because it not only helped them understand the problems and solutions in the stories we read, but also because it will help improve their writing skills. As we’ve been learning about our story elements, we’ve also focused on how we use them in our writing as well.

The memory motions we used for problem and solution were very simple. We did a sad face and a thumbs down for problem and a big smile and a thumbs up for solution.

This week was a 4 day week (yay!), so we read a read aloud together everyday, did a quick problem and solution match, and then charted the problem and solution.

Here are the books we read.

Unloveable is a FANTASTIC story to introduce problem and solution because the students can really connect with it. Plus, the main character is adorable. This is the story of Alfred the pug. None of the other animals like Alfred, but in the end he meets a friend who loves him for him. Every kid has had someone treat them unfairly, so they easily “get” the problem and solution. My girls squealed on almost every page and kept saying “He’s SO cute!” 🙂

Aaron’s Hair is a weird story, but that’s why kids tend to love it so much. Aaron grows out his hair to look like his dad, but then his long hair become a pain. He shouts “Hair I hate you!” and his hair hops off his head and runs away! Aaron chases his hair all around town, but can’t catch it. Once he realizes he actually likes his hair, his hair jumps back on his head. 🙂 Warning: you WILL have your class in stitches with this one, but again, it has a very clear problem and solution.

Crazy Hair Da y is my all time favorite book for problem and solution (which is a good thing because I was observed during this lesson). Stanley is all ready for crazy hair day. He goes all out with gel, rubber bands, and Halloween hair dye… then he gets to school and realizes it’s actually picture day! Oops! Luckily, his class comes to the rescue in a cute and fun way.

Here’s the organizer they filled out. Almost every students was able to correctly explain the problem and solution in the story.

Problem and Solution Example 1

I’m sure you’ve read Sylvester and the Magic Pebbl e. If not, it’s a must read! Sylvester finds a magic, red pebble that allows him to wish for anything he wants. On his way home to show his parents, he runs into a lion, gets scared, and wishes to be a rock! He’s stuck as a rock for months and months until luckily his parents happen to have a picnic on him. In the end, his family learns a lesson about what really matters in life. This is also a great book to discuss how characters react to problems (which is in the 2nd grade common core standards).

As I mentioned, we charted our problems and solutions all week long.

Problem and Solution Chart It

Then on Thursday, I had my students pick a fiction book from their book boxes and chart their own problem and solution. They did a fantastic job!

Problem and Solution Example 2

Click the picture below the grab the matching cards and graphic organizers I used during these lessons for free in my TpT store.

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MindManager Blog

Nine essential problem solving tools: The ultimate guide to finding a solution

October 26, 2023 by MindManager Blog

Problem solving may unfold differently depending on the industry, or even the department you work in. However, most agree that before you can fix any issue, you need to be clear on what it is, why it’s happening, and what your ideal long-term solution will achieve.

Understanding both the nature and the cause of a problem is the only way to figure out which actions will help you resolve it.

Given that most problem-solving processes are part inspiration and part perspiration, you’ll be more successful if you can reach for a problem solving tool that facilitates collaboration, encourages creative thinking, and makes it easier to implement the fix you devise.

The problem solving tools include three unique categories: problem solving diagrams, problem solving mind maps, and problem solving software solutions.

They include:

  • Fishbone diagrams
  • Strategy maps
  • Mental maps
  • Concept maps
  • Layered process audit software
  • Charting software
  • MindManager

In this article, we’ve put together a roundup of versatile problem solving tools and software to help you and your team map out and repair workplace issues as efficiently as possible.

Let’s get started!

Problem solving diagrams

Mapping your way out of a problem is the simplest way to see where you are, and where you need to end up.

Not only do visual problem maps let you plot the most efficient route from Point A (dysfunctional situation) to Point B (flawless process), problem mapping diagrams make it easier to see:

  • The root cause of a dilemma.
  • The steps, resources, and personnel associated with each possible solution.
  • The least time-consuming, most cost-effective options.

A visual problem solving process help to solidify understanding. Furthermore, it’s a great way for you and your team to transform abstract ideas into a practical, reconstructive plan.

Here are three examples of common problem mapping diagrams you can try with your team:

1. Fishbone diagrams

Fishbone diagrams are a common problem solving tool so-named because, once complete, they resemble the skeleton of a fish.

With the possible root causes of an issue (the ribs) branching off from either side of a spine line attached to the head (the problem), dynamic fishbone diagrams let you:

  • Lay out a related set of possible reasons for an existing problem
  • Investigate each possibility by breaking it out into sub-causes
  • See how contributing factors relate to one another

MindManager Fishbone Diagram 1

Fishbone diagrams are also known as cause and effect or Ishikawa diagrams.

2. Flowcharts

A flowchart is an easy-to-understand diagram with a variety of applications. But you can use it to outline and examine how the steps of a flawed process connect.

Flowchart | MindManager

Made up of a few simple symbols linked with arrows indicating workflow direction, flowcharts clearly illustrate what happens at each stage of a process – and how each event impacts other events and decisions.

3. Strategy maps

Frequently used as a strategic planning tool, strategy maps also work well as problem mapping diagrams. Based on a hierarchal system, thoughts and ideas can be arranged on a single page to flesh out a potential resolution.

Strategy Toolkit MindManager 2018

Once you’ve got a few tactics you feel are worth exploring as possible ways to overcome a challenge, a strategy map will help you establish the best route to your problem-solving goal.

Problem solving mind maps

Problem solving mind maps are especially valuable in visualization. Because they facilitate the brainstorming process that plays a key role in both root cause analysis and the identification of potential solutions, they help make problems more solvable.

Mind maps are diagrams that represent your thinking. Since many people struggle taking or working with hand-written or typed notes, mind maps were designed to let you lay out and structure your thoughts visually so you can play with ideas, concepts, and solutions the same way your brain does.

By starting with a single notion that branches out into greater detail, problem solving mind maps make it easy to:

  • Explain unfamiliar problems or processes in less time
  • Share and elaborate on novel ideas
  • Achieve better group comprehension that can lead to more effective solutions

Mind maps are a valuable problem solving tool because they’re geared toward bringing out the flexible thinking that creative solutions require. Here are three types of problem solving mind maps you can use to facilitate the brainstorming process.

4. Mental maps

A mental map helps you get your thoughts about what might be causing a workplace issue out of your head and onto a shared digital space.

Mental Map | MindManager Blog

Because mental maps mirror the way our brains take in and analyze new information, using them to describe your theories visually will help you and your team work through and test those thought models.

5. Idea maps

Mental Map | MindManager Blog

Idea maps let you take advantage of a wide assortment of colors and images to lay down and organize your scattered thought process. Idea maps are ideal brainstorming tools because they allow you to present and explore ideas about the best way to solve a problem collaboratively, and with a shared sense of enthusiasm for outside-the-box thinking.

6. Concept maps

Concept maps are one of the best ways to shape your thoughts around a potential solution because they let you create interlinked, visual representations of intricate concepts.

Concept Map | MindManager Blog

By laying out your suggested problem-solving process digitally – and using lines to form and define relationship connections – your group will be able to see how each piece of the solution puzzle connects with another.

Problem solving software solutions

Problem solving software is the best way to take advantage of multiple problem solving tools in one platform. While some software programs are geared toward specific industries or processes – like manufacturing or customer relationship management, for example – others, like MindManager , are purpose-built to work across multiple trades, departments, and teams.

Here are three problem-solving software examples.

7. Layered process audit software

Layered process audits (LPAs) help companies oversee production processes and keep an eye on the cost and quality of the goods they create. Dedicated LPA software makes problem solving easier for manufacturers because it helps them see where costly leaks are occurring and allows all levels of management to get involved in repairing those leaks.

8. Charting software

Charting software comes in all shapes and sizes to fit a variety of business sectors. Pareto charts, for example, combine bar charts with line graphs so companies can compare different problems or contributing factors to determine their frequency, cost, and significance. Charting software is often used in marketing, where a variety of bar charts and X-Y axis diagrams make it possible to display and examine competitor profiles, customer segmentation, and sales trends.

9. MindManager

No matter where you work, or what your problem-solving role looks like, MindManager is a problem solving software that will make your team more productive in figuring out why a process, plan, or project isn’t working the way it should.

Once you know why an obstruction, shortfall, or difficulty exists, you can use MindManager’s wide range of brainstorming and problem mapping diagrams to:

  • Find the most promising way to correct the situation
  • Activate your chosen solution, and
  • Conduct regular checks to make sure your repair work is sustainable

MindManager is the ultimate problem solving software.

Not only is it versatile enough to use as your go-to system for puzzling out all types of workplace problems, MindManager’s built-in forecasting tools, timeline charts, and warning indicators let you plan, implement, and monitor your solutions.

By allowing your group to work together more effectively to break down problems, uncover solutions, and rebuild processes and workflows, MindManager’s versatile collection of problem solving tools will help make everyone on your team a more efficient problem solver.

Download a free trial today to get started!

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Engaging ways to teach problem & solution.

problem solution chart example

When talking about teaching story elements, it is important to note that each of the elements has essential parts. So, when we are teaching any of those elements, we must take a deeper look into the actual standard. Today, we are going to focus on teaching problem and solution, or what is referred to in Common Core terminology as “challenge” and “response.”

I like the terms challenge and response because they encourage us to look into the character over the actual events. How does the character respond to certain events? What are the actions, feelings, thoughts of a character that stem from an event in the story? In Kindergarten and 1st grades, students will be learning how to identify the major characters and events in a story. By 2nd grade, the focus will shift into character response and continues to dive deeper with 3rd and 4th, focusing on specific character feelings, thoughts, and actions. So, how do we teach this?

Make It Personal

Initially, you will want to make it personal. Allow students to connect to the concept by facilitating a discussion on challenges. Have students share with the class, or turn and talk about simple challenges they have faced and how they reacted to them.

Here are a few ideas to start with during the students’ turn and talk.

  • Your pencil tip broke.
  • You left your homework at school.
  • Your science test is this Friday.
  • You wake up with a fever.
  • You spill juice in the living room.

These simple problems have fairly straightforward solutions. So, students will be able to build connections to the concept before diving into deeper challenges.

A simple t-chart could be made with some of your students’ scenarios as examples. Write the simple problem on the left and the simple solution on the right.

Then, Use Problem and Solution Scenarios

Learn ways to teach problem and solution, or how the character responds to challenges and events in a story. From anchor charts, to discussion opportunities, to strong read-alouds, you'll find a big collection of ideas to help you teach challenge and response (or problem and solution).

After discussing simple challenges/problems, your students will be ready to read short texts that contain a character facing a challenge. Allow students time to discuss the challenge and the character’s response to it. You can also continue your discussion from earlier, including larger challenges or problems.

Add to your anchor chart (or create a new one) noting the difference in simple problems and solutions and character challenges and responses. *This may be a time for you to discuss bigger challenges that your students have faced in their lifetimes, recalling how students may have responded differently. It is important for students to understand that different people/characters will respond differently to certain events. This is what helps us understand them.

Gather Books with a Strong Problem and Solution Plot

Mentor texts for character challenge

When teaching problem and solutions, read alouds are going to be essential. You will need to collect books that have a strong problem/solution or challenge/response plot. Look for books where the main character faces a clear and difficult challenge. One that allows us to see how the character acts, thinks, feels, etc.

Here are a few affiliate titles I suggest from Amazon!

  • Ira Sleeps Over by Bernard Waber
  • The Name Jar by  Yangsook Choi
  • Chrysanthemum by Kevin Henkes
  • Harry the Dirty Dog by Gene Zion 
  • Jamaica’s Find by Juanita Havill 
  • Enemy Pie by Derek Munson 

Each of these stories provides an opportunity for your students to look at character responses. They are great for group discussions about challenges and the different ways to face them.

Ask Students to Find Problem and Solution in Text

Learn ways to teach problem and solution, or how the character responds to challenges and events in a story. From anchor charts, to discussion opportunities, to strong read-alouds, you'll find a big collection of ideas to help you teach challenge and response (or problem and solution).

Subsequently, students will need to identify and describe the problem/solution within texts. When first learning the skill, students can illustrate what they think the problem and solution look like. Then, they can build their skills by writing their descriptions. The more opportunities students have with communicating their understanding, the better they will become. So, consider allowing them to do this multiple times before moving on.

Learn ways to teach problem and solution, or how the character responds to challenges and events in a story. From anchor charts, to discussion opportunities, to strong read-alouds, you'll find a big collection of ideas to help you teach challenge and response (or problem and solution).

Similarly, students will need to be able to read and comprehend fiction stories independently. So, the next step is for students to read on-level texts with comprehension questions. Printable or digital passages with skill-specific questions will be a huge help during this stage of the learning process. One of the great things about problem and solution practice is that, even in isolation, it can build students’ understanding of other elements like plot, character, theme, etc. So, include plenty of comprehension passages in your student practice activities.

Suggested Resource Focused on Problem and Solution

problem solution chart example

The second-grade standard, RL.2.3 is focused specifically on challenge and response. The unit above (some activities seen in the photos in today’s post) is complete with lesson plans, activities, graphic organizers, comprehension passages, task cards, and more, all focused on building this specific skill. However, each of the other grades contains an element of this skill within their own RL.3 standards. It is so important to ensure adequate practice and direct skill-focus for each of our grade levels!

  • RL.2.3- Character Response Unit

Other Grade Level Units That Help Build/Continue Skill

problem solution chart example

  • RL.K.3- Kindergarten
  • RL.1.3- 1st Grade
  • RL.3.3- 3rd Grade
  • RL.4.3- 4th Grade

Want to read more about story elements? Check out these blog posts.

  • 3 Engaging Story Elements Activities
  • Characters- Story Elements Study
  • Events- Teaching Events to Students
  • All About Setting- Story Elements Study
  • Story Elements- Teaching Tips
  • Read more about: Common Core Aligned , Comprehension , Reading Blog Posts

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Problem-solving – Flowchart example

The flowchart starts with identifying a problem. After the problem is identified, data is gathered and analyzed. Then, the solution is developed and the best solution is identified. If it isn’t successful, the solution development process starts again. If successful, the plan is implemented and is improved continuously.

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Problem-Solving diagram code in Gleek

Start:queue Identify the problem Data gathering Analyze data Solution development Identify the best solution Successful?:diamond Plan implementation Continue to improve Finish:queue Start–>Identify the problem Identify the problem–>Data gathering Data gathering–>Analyze data Analyze data–>Solution development Solution development–>Identify the best solution Identify the best solution–>Successful? Successful?-no->Solution development Successful?-yes->Plan implementation Plan implementation–>Continue to improve Continue to improve–>Finish

About Flowcharts

A flowchart, or flow chart, is a type of diagram that shows a step-by-step view of a process. Flowcharts document the tasks and decisions needed to achieve a specific goal. A basic flowchart is easy to make and understand. Businesses, engineers and software designers often use flowcharts to diagram their ideas.

Similar flowchart examples

Product development flowchart

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Top 10 Problem Solving Templates with Samples and Examples

Top 10 Problem Solving Templates with Samples and Examples

In today's competitive business world, excelling at problem solving is crucial for achieving success. A recent study by McKinsey has shown that companies that are skilled at problem solving tend to outperform their peers in terms of revenue growth and shareholder returns. In fact, the top quartile of problem-solving organizations achieved 50% higher revenue growth and 33% higher total returns to shareholders compared to the bottom quartile. Therefore, it's clear that mastering problem solving is essential for any business to thrive.

Finding effective solutions to business challenges, however, can be daunting. That's where SlideTeam's Problem-solving Templates come in to provide a step-by-step approach enabling you to break down complex issues into manageable parts and develop effective solutions. We offer a range of templates, including SWOT analysis, Fishbone diagrams, and Root Cause Analysis, that will equip you with the tools you need to tackle any business problem.

Problem-Solving Templates

If you're tired of struggling to find solutions to the challenges your business faces, explore these Problem-Solving Templates. Don't let obstacles hold your business back – try our templates today and take your business to the next level.

Let’s begin.

Template 1: Organizational Problem-Solving Tool PowerPoint Presentation

For an organization, problem-solving is required in all its operational aspects-right, from planning, controlling, marketing, and manufacturing to managing financial aspects, products as well as customers. This PPT template presents slides that enable an organization to analyze information across all its operations and departments and identify problems and then solve these problems. This editable PPT Template enables an organization to plan its progress path by allocating the right people and resources to solve problems.

Organizational Problem Solving Tool

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Template 2: Problem Solving Approach Business Organizational Analysis Assessment Systems

This editable PPT Template with its attractive graphics and design, enables any business to adopt the right approach to problem-solving. The template enables any organization to analyze different approaches like three-phase approach, collaborative approach, strategy-based approach, etc.

Problem Solving Approach

Template 3: Sample A3 Problem Solving Report Collection of Quality Control Templates PPT Diagrams

This easy-to-use PPT template helps organizations solve problems related to quality control. Using this template, an organization can identify the root cause of the problem and the background of the problem and formulate a plan of action to solve the problem. It includes sections for the current situation, checking, acting, and rectifying the errors.

Sample A3 Problem Solving Report

Template 4: Sample A3 Problem Solving Report

This customizable and readily downloadable PPT template enables an organization to solve problems that are reflected in quality assurance reports. Any business can identify a quality-related problem, its background, its cause, as well as other aspects of the problem and then find the best solution to the problem using this template.

Sample A3 Problem Solving Report

Template 5: Optimizing Transformation Strawman Proposal

For any organization, it is important to achieve operational efficiency. However, several issues are often faced when it comes to the operational aspects of a business, and identifying these is mandatory for an organization. Using this PPT Template, an organization can analyze its operational problems and discuss in detail how technology can be used to solve the problem and bring about a transformation that can help to enhance operational efficiency.

Optimizing Operational Efficiency through Transformation

Template 6: Collaborative Problem Solving and Assessment Approach

This PPT template, available for instant download, helps an organization to use a collaborative problem-solving and assessment approach to analyze problems related to new products, technologies, ideas, etc., and adopt the best practices to solve the problem.

Collaborative Problem Solving and Assessment Approach

Template 7: Situation Complication Resolution Framework for Problem Solving

This attractive PPT Template, with its colorful graphics, enables an organization to adopt the framework model to solve a problem. This model enables any business to analyze the current situation, identify the complications associated with the situation, and then find the solution or the best way to resolve the problem.

Situation Complication Resolution Framework for Problem Solving

Template 8: Five-circle Arrow Process for Problem Solving

This adaptable PPT template, with its attractive design, provides a five-circle arrow process for solving problems related to any aspect of the organization. Using this PPT template, an organization can define a problem, generate new ideas to solve the problem, evaluate and select solutions and implement and evaluate the solutions to ensure that the problem gets solved in the most optimal manner.

Five Circle Arrow Process for Problem Solving

Template 9: 3-Step Process of Problem-solving Analysis

The process of problem-solving is not always easy because, most of the time, a business fails to identify the problem. Using this customizable PPT Template, a business can adopt a 3-step approach to problem-solving. With the help of this template, an organization can implement the stages of problem identification, problem analysis, and solution development to solve the problem in the most effective manner.

3 Step Process of Problem Solving Analysis

Template 10: 6 segments of problem-solving model

This PPT template presents 6 steps to solve a problem that an organization may face in any of its operational aspects. This PPT template is easy to edit and enables any business to adopt the stages of defining a problem, determining the root cause of the problem, evaluating the outcome, selecting a solution, implementing the solution, and developing alternative solutions. This model, when adopted by an organization, enables it to find the most optimal solution to the problem.

6 Segments of Problem Solving Model

The Final Word

Every problem is a gift - without problems, we would not grow." - Tony Robbins. This quote highlights the importance of embracing challenges as opportunities for growth and development. When businesses approach problem-solving with a positive mindset and a willingness to learn, they can turn even the most challenging situations into valuable learning experiences.

Now that you know how using problem-solving templates can assist you in streamlining the entire process, it’s time to download these templates and get started.

FAQs on Problem-Solving

What are the 7 steps to problem-solving.

A business, during its operations, may face several problems that need to be solved so that the problem does not impact the organization in an adverse manner. However, to solve a problem in the most efficient manner, a business must adopt a seven-step approach to problem-solving. These steps include:

  • Identifying the problem.
  • Analyzing the problem.
  • Describing the problem and all its parameters.
  • Identifying the root cause of the problem.
  • Developing solutions to solve the problem.
  • Implementing the solution that seems to be the most effective.
  • Measuring the results.

Why is problem-solving important?

Problem-solving enables an organization to handle unexpected situations or face challenges that it may face during its operations. For every organization, problem-solving is important as it enables the organization to:

  • Identify activities, processes, and people that are not working in an efficient manner.
  • Identify risks and address these risks.
  • Implement changes when required.
  • Enhance performance and productivity.
  • Innovate and execute new ideas.
  • Make effective decisions.

What are the five problem-solving skills?

Problem-solving is not an easy task, and any consultant in the organization who works to solve problems needs to exhibit some specific skills. These skills include but are not limited to:

  • Creativity that enables the consultant to assess and analyze the problem from various perspectives to come up with the best idea.
  • Communication to ensure that the problem and its solutions are easily communicated with others in the organization.
  • Teamwork so that everyone in the team can work to solve the problem.
  • Critical analysis to think analytically about a problem and solve it in the best manner possible.
  • Information processing to process and analyze all information that is associated with the problem.

What are the 4 steps of problem-solving?

Problem-solving needs to be carried out using a series of steps that include:

  • Identifying and analyzing the problem so that its cause is known.
  • Planning and determining how to solve the problem by finding various solutions.
  • Implementing the chosen solution to solve the problem.
  • Evaluating solutions to know whether the problem has been resolved or not. 

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Problem and Solution Graphic Organizer

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Problem and Solution Map can be useful for students to compare different solutions to a problem

You can easily edit this template using Creately's block diagram maker . You can export it in multiple formats like JPEG, PNG and SVG and easily add it to Word documents, Powerpoint (PPT) presentations, Excel or any other documents. You can export it as a PDF for high-quality printouts.

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19 Comments

Excellent site,it’s very helpful.

Nice website. It’s a big help in my coming English proficiency test.

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You got me… and yourself. WTG!

Can I copy and paste this?

Can you, or should you?

Help use find problems and solutions

What is the main function of this?

calline charles

thats the same question i’m asking

can you give other examples

Jerlyn Zara

very informational.. thank you .. godbless

Great for doing research on text structures.

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nelrose capate

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your research are good approch and we understanding from your literture for next time more wide information gather to input utilized.

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Doyo Gnaressa

inorder to get the answer of the given questions

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Venn Diagram Examples, Problems and Solutions

On this page:

  • What is Venn diagram? Definition and meaning.
  • Venn diagram formula with an explanation.
  • Examples of 2 and 3 sets Venn diagrams: practice problems with solutions, questions, and answers.
  • Simple 4 circles Venn diagram with word problems.
  • Compare and contrast Venn diagram example.

Let’s define it:

A Venn Diagram is an illustration that shows logical relationships between two or more sets (grouping items). Venn diagram uses circles (both overlapping and nonoverlapping) or other shapes.

Commonly, Venn diagrams show how given items are similar and different.

Despite Venn diagram with 2 or 3 circles are the most common type, there are also many diagrams with a larger number of circles (5,6,7,8,10…). Theoretically, they can have unlimited circles.

Venn Diagram General Formula

n(A ∪ B) = n(A) + n(B) – n(A ∩ B)

Don’t worry, there is no need to remember this formula, once you grasp the meaning. Let’s see the explanation with an example.

This is a very simple Venn diagram example that shows the relationship between two overlapping sets X, Y.

X – the number of items that belong to set A Y – the number of items that belong to set B Z – the number of items that belong to set A and B both

From the above Venn diagram, it is quite clear that

n(A) = x + z n(B) = y + z n(A ∩ B) = z n(A ∪ B) = x +y+ z.

Now, let’s move forward and think about Venn Diagrams with 3 circles.

Following the same logic, we can write the formula for 3 circles Venn diagram :

n(A ∪ B ∪ C) = n(A) + n(B) + n(C) – n(A ∩ B) – n(B ∩ C) – n(C ∩ A) + n(A ∩ B ∩ C)

Venn Diagram Examples (Problems with Solutions)

As we already know how the Venn diagram works, we are going to give some practical examples (problems with solutions) from the real life.

2 Circle Venn Diagram Examples (word problems):

Suppose that in a town, 800 people are selected by random types of sampling methods . 280 go to work by car only, 220 go to work by bicycle only and 140 use both ways – sometimes go with a car and sometimes with a bicycle.

Here are some important questions we will find the answers:

  • How many people go to work by car only?
  • How many people go to work by bicycle only?
  • How many people go by neither car nor bicycle?
  • How many people use at least one of both transportation types?
  • How many people use only one of car or bicycle?

The following Venn diagram represents the data above:

Now, we are going to answer our questions:

  • Number of people who go to work by car only = 280
  • Number of people who go to work by bicycle only = 220
  • Number of people who go by neither car nor bicycle = 160
  • Number of people who use at least one of both transportation types = n(only car) + n(only bicycle) + n(both car and bicycle) = 280 + 220 + 140 = 640
  • Number of people who use only one of car or bicycle = 280 + 220 = 500

Note: The number of people who go by neither car nor bicycle (160) is illustrated outside of the circles. It is a common practice the number of items that belong to none of the studied sets, to be illustrated outside of the diagram circles.

We will deep further with a more complicated triple Venn diagram example.

3 Circle Venn Diagram Examples:

For the purposes of a marketing research , a survey of 1000 women is conducted in a town. The results show that 52 % liked watching comedies, 45% liked watching fantasy movies and 60% liked watching romantic movies. In addition, 25% liked watching comedy and fantasy both, 28% liked watching romantic and fantasy both and 30% liked watching comedy and romantic movies both. 6% liked watching none of these movie genres.

Here are our questions we should find the answer:

  • How many women like watching all the three movie genres?
  • Find the number of women who like watching only one of the three genres.
  • Find the number of women who like watching at least two of the given genres.

Let’s represent the data above in a more digestible way using the Venn diagram formula elements:

  • n(C) = percentage of women who like watching comedy = 52%
  • n(F ) = percentage of women who like watching fantasy = 45%
  • n(R) = percentage of women who like watching romantic movies= 60%
  • n(C∩F) = 25%; n(F∩R) = 28%; n(C∩R) = 30%
  • Since 6% like watching none of the given genres so, n (C ∪ F ∪ R) = 94%.

Now, we are going to apply the Venn diagram formula for 3 circles. 

94% = 52% + 45% + 60% – 25% – 28% – 30% + n (C ∩ F ∩ R)

Solving this simple math equation, lead us to:

n (C ∩ F ∩ R)  = 20%

It is a great time to make our Venn diagram related to the above situation (problem):

See, the Venn diagram makes our situation much more clear!

From the Venn diagram example, we can answer our questions with ease.

  • The number of women who like watching all the three genres = 20% of 1000 = 200.
  • Number of women who like watching only one of the three genres = (17% + 12% + 22%) of 1000 = 510
  • The number of women who like watching at least two of the given genres = (number of women who like watching only two of the genres) +(number of women who like watching all the three genres) = (10 + 5 + 8 + 20)% i.e. 43% of 1000 = 430.

As we mentioned above 2 and 3 circle diagrams are much more common for problem-solving in many areas such as business, statistics, data science and etc. However, 4 circle Venn diagram also has its place.

4 Circles Venn Diagram Example:

A set of students were asked to tell which sports they played in school.

The options are: Football, Hockey, Basketball, and Netball.

Here is the list of the results:

The next step is to draw a Venn diagram to show the data sets we have.

It is very clear who plays which sports. As you see the diagram also include the student who does not play any sports (Dorothy) by putting her name outside of the 4 circles.

From the above Venn diagram examples, it is obvious that this graphical tool can help you a lot in representing a variety of data sets. Venn diagram also is among the most popular types of graphs for identifying similarities and differences .

Compare and Contrast Venn Diagram Example:

The following compare and contrast example of Venn diagram compares the features of birds and bats:

Tools for creating Venn diagrams

It is quite easy to create Venn diagrams, especially when you have the right tool. Nowadays, one of the most popular way to create them is with the help of paid or free graphing software tools such as:

You can use Microsoft products such as:

Some free mind mapping tools are also a good solution. Finally, you can simply use a sheet of paper or a whiteboard.

Conclusion:

A Venn diagram is a simple but powerful way to represent the relationships between datasets. It makes understanding math, different types of data analysis , set theory and business information easier and more fun for you.

Besides of using Venn diagram examples for problem-solving and comparing, you can use them to present passion, talent, feelings, funny moments and etc.

Be it data science or real-world situations, Venn diagrams are a great weapon in your hand to deal with almost any kind of information.

If you need more chart examples, our posts fishbone diagram examples and what does scatter plot show might be of help.

About The Author

problem solution chart example

Silvia Valcheva

Silvia Valcheva is a digital marketer with over a decade of experience creating content for the tech industry. She has a strong passion for writing about emerging software and technologies such as big data, AI (Artificial Intelligence), IoT (Internet of Things), process automation, etc.

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  1. Problem-Solution Chart

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  4. What's Your Problem? Teaching Problem and Solution

    problem solution chart example

  5. Problem and Solution Anchor Chart

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  6. Problem and solution anchor chart Anchor Charts First Grade

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COMMENTS

  1. Problem-Solving Flowchart: A Visual Method to Find Perfect Solutions

    Lucid Content Reading time: about 7 min Topics: Lucidchart tips "People ask me questions Lost in confusion Well, I tell them there's no problem Only solutions" —John Lennon, "Watching the Wheels" Despite John Lennon's lyrics, nobody is free from problems, and that's especially true in business.

  2. Problem Solution Mapping

    1. What is a Problem Solution Map A problem solution map represents a logical analysis of available data leading towards a solution. In other words, a problem solution map uses the given data to provide a solution to the problem. A straightforward solution map can have various elements. Typically, it has the following structure: a problem statement

  3. Problem and Solution Graphic Organizer Examples

    Here are some examples of problem and solution diagrams: Example 1: Problem and Solution Graphic Organizer This graphic organizer depicts a simple problem and solution layout. In this example, the problem is shown at the top of the page and it is divided into three sections viz. 'Who?', 'What?' and 'Why?'

  4. ReadingQuest Strategies

    Strategies for Reading Comprehension Problem-Solution Tweet What Is a Problem-Solution Chart? The Problem-Solution chart is a variation of column notes. It helps students focus on the four areas critical to problem-solving: identifying the problem, listing the consequences or results of that problem, isolating the causes, and proposing solutions.

  5. What is a Problem-Solving Flowchart & How to Make One

    By Danesh Ramuthi, Aug 10, 2023 Problem-Solving Flowcharts, contrary to what many believe aren't just aesthetic wonders — they're almost like magical blueprints for troubleshooting those pesky problems that many of us face. Flowcharts take business challenges and turn them into a navigable pathway.

  6. Problem Solution Graphic Organizer

    A Problem Solution Graphic Organizer (PSGO) is a tool used in education to quickly identify and analyze a problem. It breaks down the problem into three main parts: description, causes, and solutions. By identifying each of these sections, students can use the organizer to brainstorm potential solutions to their problem.

  7. How to create a problem-solving flow chart

    Example 1 Problem solving flow chart In our first example, we're going to start with something simple to show you the principle of the tool. We have been given a cup of tea and we don't like it! Let's use a problem-solving flow chart to find out what's gone wrong.

  8. Problem-Solution Chart

    Create Education Worksheet examples like this template called Problem-Solution Chart that you can easily edit and customize in minutes. 9/26 EXAMPLES. EDIT THIS EXAMPLE. CLICK TO EDIT THIS EXAMPLE. Text in this Example: Problem - Solution Chart Problem Possible Solutions Name: Date: By continuing to use the website, you consent to the use of ...

  9. PDF Problem-Solution Chart

    Title: Problem-Solution Chart Author: Raymond C. Jones Subject: ReadingQuest Created Date: 2/14/2018 6:06:55 PM

  10. What is Problem Solving? Steps, Process & Techniques

    Finding a suitable solution for issues can be accomplished by following the basic four-step problem-solving process and methodology outlined below. Step. Characteristics. 1. Define the problem. Differentiate fact from opinion. Specify underlying causes. Consult each faction involved for information. State the problem specifically.

  11. Problem and Solution Graphic Organizer Examples & Templates

    In this article 01 What is a Problem and Solution Organizer 02 10 Problems and Solutions Graphic Organizer Examples for All Grades 03 Conclusion 1. What is a Problem and Solution Organizer A problem solution organizer is a graphical representation of problems and solutions.

  12. What Is a Fishbone Diagram?

    A fishbone diagram is a problem-solving approach that uses a fish-shaped diagram to model possible root causes of problems and troubleshoot possible solutions. It is also called an Ishikawa diagram, after its creator, Kaoru Ishikawa, as well as a herringbone diagram or cause-and-effect diagram. Fishbone diagrams are often used in root cause ...

  13. Problem-Solution Chart

    Create Education Worksheet examples like this template called Problem-Solution Chart that you can easily edit and customize in minutes. 9/26 EXAMPLES. EDIT THIS EXAMPLE. CLICK TO EDIT THIS EXAMPLE. Text in this Example: Problem - Solution Chart Problem Possible Solutions Name: Date: By continuing to use the website, you consent to the use of ...

  14. What's Your Problem? Teaching Problem and Solution

    The memory motions we used for problem and solution were very simple. We did a sad face and a thumbs down for problem and a big smile and a thumbs up for solution. This week was a 4 day week (yay!), so we read a read aloud together everyday, did a quick problem and solution match, and then charted the problem and solution. Here are the books we ...

  15. 9 essential problem solving tools: the ultimate guide

    Here are three examples of common problem mapping diagrams you can try with your team: 1. Fishbone diagrams ... Problem solving software solutions. Problem solving software is the best way to take advantage of multiple problem solving tools in one platform. ... Pareto charts, for example, combine bar charts with line graphs so companies can ...

  16. Engaging Ways to Teach Problem & Solution

    These simple problems have fairly straightforward solutions. So, students will be able to build connections to the concept before diving into deeper challenges. A simple t-chart could be made with some of your students' scenarios as examples. Write the simple problem on the left and the simple solution on the right.

  17. Problem-solving

    Problem-solving - Flowchart example | Gleek Problem-solving - Flowchart example The flowchart starts with identifying a problem. After the problem is identified, data is gathered and analyzed. Then, the solution is developed and the best solution is identified. If it isn't successful, the solution development process starts again.

  18. Top 10 Problem Solving Templates with Samples and Examples

    Template 1: Organizational Problem-Solving Tool PowerPoint Presentation For an organization, problem-solving is required in all its operational aspects-right, from planning, controlling, marketing, and manufacturing to managing financial aspects, products as well as customers.

  19. Problem and Solution Graphic Organizer

    Examples Block Diagram Problem and Solution Graphic Organizer by Creately Templates Edit this Template Use Creately's easy online diagram editor to edit this diagram, collaborate with others and export results to multiple image formats. Problem and Solution Map can be useful for students to compare different solutions to a problem

  20. Problem and Solution

    Example: It seems like there has been a surge in teen pregnancies these days. Teen pregnancies make it very difficult for young mothers to pursue their dreams and meet the demands of an infant. Fortunately, most teen pregnancies can be easily prevented by using birth control; however, even birth control is not 100% effective.

  21. Venn Diagram Examples, Problems and Solutions

    The best way to explain how the Venn diagram works and what its formulas show is to give 2 or 3 circles Venn diagram examples and problems with solutions. Problem-solving using Venn diagram is a widely used approach in many areas such as statistics, data science, business, set theory, math, logic and etc.

  22. Bar Diagrams for Problem Solving. Create business management bar charts

    The PERT chart example "Sale problem solution" was created using the ConceptDraw PRO diagramming and vector drawing software extended with the solution Seven Management and Planning Tools from the Management area of ConceptDraw Solution Park. PERT. Legend. Used Solutions.