Lobbying Disclosure

Office of the clerk, united states house of representatives.

  • LD-1/LD-2 Reporting
  • LD-203 Contributions

Table of Contents

  • Section 1: Introduction
  • Section 2: What’s New
  • Section 3: Definitions
  • Section 4: Lobbying Registration
  • Section 5: Special Registration Circumstances
  • Section 6: Quarterly Reporting of Lobbying Activities
  • Section 7: Semiannual Reporting of Certain Contributions
  • Section 8: Termination of a Lobbyist/Termination of a Registrant
  • Section 9: Relationship of the LDA to Other Statutes
  • Section 10: Public Availability
  • Section 11: Review and Compliance
  • Section 12: Penalties

Lobbying Disclosure Act Guidance

Section 1 – introduction.

The Lobbying Disclosure Act, as amended, ( 2 U.S.C. § 1601 et. seq., referred to hereinafter as the “LDA”) states that the Secretary of the Senate and the Clerk of the House of Representatives shall (1) provide guidance and assistance on the registrations and reporting requirements of this Act and develop common standards, rules, and procedures for compliance with this Act; [and] (2) review, and, where necessary, verify and inquire to ensure the accuracy, completeness, and timeliness of registrations and reports.

The LDA does not provide the Secretary or the Clerk with the authority to write substantive regulations or issue definitive opinions on, or enforce the law. Rather, it is the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Columbia that enforces the LDA. The Secretary and Clerk have, from time to time, jointly issued written guidance on the registration and reporting requirements. This document is a compilation of all previously issued guidance documents and supersedes all previous guidance documents.

This combined guidance document does not have the force of law, nor does it have any binding effect on the United States Attorney for the District of Columbia or any other part of the Executive Branch. To the extent that the guidance relates to the accuracy, completeness, and timeliness of registrations and reports, it will serve to inform the public as to how the Secretary and Clerk intend to carry out their responsibilities under the LDA.

Section 2 – What’s New

This revision includes updated registration thresholds reflecting changes in the Consumer Price Index, adds a section on the Justice Against Corruption on K Street Act of 2018 (the “JACK Act”), as well as new sections regarding listing lobbyists and listing affiliates. Clarification is also provided regarding the definition and disclosure of covered officials.

Updated Registration Threshold

As required by the LDA, the lobbying disclosure thresholds referenced throughout the Guidance have been updated to reflect changes in the Consumer Price Index (as determined by the Secretary of Labor) during the preceding 4-year period. After January 1, 2021, an organization employing in-house lobbyists is exempt from registration if its total expenses for lobbying activities do not exceed and are not expected to exceed $14,000 during a quarterly period. The $3,000 income threshold for lobbying firms remains unchanged. See Guidance Section 4 on “Who Must Register and When” for additional information.

The “JACK Act”

Section 4 and Section 6 are revised to include The Justice Against Corruption on K Street Act of 2018 (the JACK Act), which amended the LDA effective January 3, 2019. The Act requires all registrations (LD-1) and quarterly activity reports (LD-2) to include:

“for any listed lobbyist who was convicted in a Federal or State court of an offense involving bribery, extortion, embezzlement, an illegal kickback, tax evasion, fraud, a conflict of interest, making a false statement, perjury, or money laundering, the date of the conviction and a description of the offense.”

To comply with this requirement and ensure the accuracy and completeness of the disclosure, all registrants must list the required information for every listed lobbyist with any prior conviction of an offense involving one of the JACK Act’s listed predicates (a “predicate offense”). Once a JACK Act disclosure is required for a listed lobbyist, that disclosure will be required on every future registration or quarterly report that includes that lobbyist.

Identification of Client and Covered Officials

Clarification is provided in Section 4 on the requirement of executive branch and legislative branch offices to disclose whether contacted individuals are covered officials under the LDA.

Definition of Covered Officials

The guidance regarding identification of covered officials has been expanded to assist the filing community.

Listing Lobbyists

A new subject is added to Section 4 outlining additional details for listing lobbyists on registrations (LD-1) and quarterly activity reports (LD-2), and clarifying that outside contract lobbyists are not to be listed on the registrations (LD-1) or quarterly activity reports (LD-2).

Listing Affiliates

A new subject is added to Section 4 providing additional guidance on listing affiliates and the circumstances in which a registrant may rely on a link to the client’s publicly accessible Internet website to disclose one or more affiliates, as defined by the LDA.

Filers are expected to use due diligence when filling out and submitting registrations (LD-1), quarterly activity reports (LD-2), and semiannual contribution reports (LD-203).

Section 3 – Definitions

  • The President
  • The Vice President
  • Officers and employees of the Executive Office of the President
  • Any official serving in an Executive Level I through V position
  • Any member of the uniformed services serving at grade O-7 or above
  • Schedule C employees.
  • A Member of Congress
  • An elected Officer of either the House or the Senate
  • An employee, or any other individual functioning in the capacity of an employee, who works for a Member, committee, leadership staff of either the Senate or House, a joint committee of Congress, a working group or caucus organized to provide services to Members, and any other Legislative Branch employee serving in a position described under Section 109(13) of the Ethics in Government Act of 1978 (5 U.S.C. Appendix § 109(13)).

Section 4 – Lobbying Registration

Who must register and when.

Lobbying firms are required to file a separate registration for each client. A lobbying firm is exempt from registration for a particular client if its total income from that client for lobbying activities does not exceed and is not expected to exceed $3,000 during a quarterly period.

Note: A lobbyist is not the registrant unless he/she is self-employed. In that case, the self-employed lobbyist is treated as a lobbying firm.

Organizations employing in-house lobbyists file a single registration. Such an organization is exempt from registration if its total expenses for lobbying activities do not exceed and are not expected to exceed $14,000 during a quarterly period.

The registration requirement of potential registrants is triggered either (1) on the date their employee/lobbyist is employed or retained to make more than one lobbying contact on behalf of a client (and meets the 20 percent of time threshold), or (2) on the date their employee/lobbyist (who meets the 20 percent of time threshold) in fact makes a second lobbying contact, whichever is earlier. In either case, registration is required within 45 days.

Example 1: Lobbying firm “A” is retained on May 1, 2015 by Client “B” to make lobbying contacts and conduct lobbying activities. “A” files a registration (LD-1) on behalf of “B” with an effective date of registration of May 1, 2015.

Example 2: Corporation “C” does not employ an individual who meets the definition of “lobbyist.” Employee “X” is told by her supervisor to contact the Congressman representing the district in which Corporation “C” is headquartered. “X” makes a lobbying contact on June 1, 2015. “X” does not anticipate making any further lobbying contacts, but spends 25 percent of her time on this legislative issue. No registration is required at this point. In August 2015, “X” is instructed to follow up with the Congressman. “C” registers and discloses August 5, 2015 as the effective date of registration (the date that “X” contacted the Congressman for the second time and thereby met the definition of a lobbyist).

Preparing to File a Registration – Threshold Requirements

In order to determine the applicability of the LDA, one must first look at the definition of “lobbyist” under 2 U.S.C. § 1602(10) . Under this definition, an individual is a “lobbyist” with respect to a particular client if he or she makes more than one lobbying contact and his or her “lobbying activities” (as defined in 2 U.S.C. § 1602(7) ) constitute at least 20 percent of the individual’s time in services for that client over any three-month period. Note that a registration would not be required for pro bono clients since the monetary thresholds of 2 U.S.C. §1603(a)(3)(A)(i) in the case of a lobbying firm, or of 2 U.S.C. § 1603(a)(3)(A)(ii) in the case of an organization employing in-house lobbyists, would not be met. Keep in mind that the obligation to report arises from active status as a registrant. Therefore if a registration has been filed for a pro bono client, quarterly activity reports (LD-2) and semiannual contribution reports (LD-203) would be expected to be filed until the registration is validly terminated.

More than One Lobbying Contact

“More than one lobbying contact” means more than one communication to a covered official. Note that an individual falls within the definition of “lobbyist” by making more than one lobbying contact over the course of services provided for a particular client (even if the second contact occurs in a later quarterly period).

Example 1: Lobbyist “A” telephones Covered Official “B” in the morning to discuss proposed legislation. In the afternoon she telephones Covered Official “C” to discuss the same legislation. Lobbyist “A” has made more than one lobbying contact.

Example 2: Under some circumstances a series of discussions with a particular official might be considered a single communication, such as when a telephone call is interrupted and continued at a later time. Discussions taking place on more than one day with the same covered official, however, should be presumed to be more than one lobbying contact.

Clarification of an Exception to Lobbying Contact

The LDA excepts from the definition of “lobbying contact” communications “required by subpoena, civil investigative demand, or otherwise compelled by statute, regulation, or other action of the Congress or an agency.” ( 2 U.S.C. § 1602(8)(B)(ix) ). Communications that are compelled by the action of a Federal agency include communications that are required by a Federal agency contract, grant, loan, permit, or license ( 2 U.S.C. § 1602(8)(B)(vix) ).

Example: Contractor “A” has a contract to provide technical assistance to Agency “B” on an ongoing basis. Technical communications between Contractor “A’s” personnel and covered officials at Agency “B” would be required by the contract and therefore would not constitute “lobbying contacts.”

Note, however, that this exception would not encompass an attempt by “A” to influence covered officials regarding either matters of policy, or an award of a new contract, since such communications would not be required by the existing contract.

Do Lobbying Activities Constitute 20 Percent Or More of an Individual’s Time?

Lobbying activity is defined in 2 U.S.C. § 1602(7) as “lobbying contacts and efforts in support of such contacts, including . . . background work that is intended, at the time it is performed, for use in contacts, and coordination with the lobbying activities of others.” If the intent of the work is to support ongoing and future lobbying, then it would fall within the definition of lobbying activities. Timing of the work performed, as well as the status of the issue, is also pivotal. Generally, if work such as reporting or monitoring occurs at a time when future lobbying contacts are contemplated, such reporting and monitoring should be considered as a part of planning or coordinating of lobbying contacts, and therefore included as “lobbying activity.” If, on the other hand, a person reports back to the relevant committee or officer regarding the status of a completed effort, that activity would probably not be included as a lobbying activity, if reports are not being used to prepare a lobbying strategy the next time the issue is considered.

Communications excepted from the definition of "lobbying contact" under 2 U.S.C. § 1602(8)(B) may be considered “lobbying activities” under some circumstances. Communications excepted by 2 U.S.C. § 1602(8)(B) will constitute “lobbying activities” if they are in support of other communications which constitute “lobbying contacts.”

Example: Under 2 U.S.C. § 1602(8)(B)(v) , the term “lobbying contact” does not include “a request for a meeting, a request for the status of an action, or any other similar administrative request, if the request does not include an attempt to influence a covered Executive Branch official or a covered Legislative Branch official.” However, a status request would constitute “lobbying activity” if it were in support of a subsequent lobbying contact.

Please note that for disclosure purposes the 20 percent of time threshold applies to registration and not to the reporting section.

Is it Lobbying Contact/Lobbying Activity?

If a communication is limited to routine information gathering questions and there is not an attempt to influence a covered official, the exception of 2 U.S.C. § 1602(8)(B)(v) for “any other similar administrative request” would normally apply. In determining whether there is an attempt to influence a covered official, the identity of the person asking the questions and her relationship to the covered official obviously will be important factors.

Example 1: Lobbyist “A”, a former chief of staff in a congressional office, is now a partner in the law firm retained to lobby for Client “B.” After waiting one year to comply with staff post‑employment restrictions on lobbying, Lobbyist “A” telephones the Member on whose staff she served. She asks about the status of legislation affecting Client “B’s” interests. Presumably “B” will expect the call to have been part of an effort to influence the Member, even though only routine matters were raised at that particular time.

Example 2: Company “Z” offers temporary employment to recent college graduates. The graduates are hired to conduct surveys of congressional staff by reading prepared questions and recording the answers. The questions seek only information. These communications do not amount to lobby contacts.

2 U.S.C. § 1609(a) requires that any person making an oral lobbying contact with a covered official shall disclose, on the request of the covered official at the time of the lobbying contact: (a) whether that person is registered under this act; (b) the name of the client represented; (c) whether that client is a foreign entity; and (d) the name of any foreign entity that has a direct interest in the outcome of the lobbying activity who contributes more than $5,000 to the lobbying activities of the client and either holds at least 20 percent equitable ownership of the client or actively participates in the planning, supervision, or control of such lobbying activities.

Individuals making written contact with a covered official (including electronic communication) must disclose: (a) if the client on whose behalf the lobbying contact was made is a foreign entity and, if so, the name of the client represented and whether the writer is a registrant under the LDA and (b) any foreign entity that has a direct interest in the outcome of the lobbying activity who contributes more than $5,000 to the lobbying activities of the client and either holds at least 20 percent equitable ownership of the client or actively participates in the planning, supervision, or control of such lobbying activities.

Upon request by individuals making lobbying contacts, the individual being contacted or their employing office must indicate whether the individual is a covered official as defined in 2 U.S.C. § 1602(3) and (4) . Executive or legislative branch officials, or their offices, are required to indicate whether contacted officials are covered officials under the LDA. When such offices decline to indicate whether an individual is a covered official, we recommend providing them the exact statutory language and citation to clarify what the law requires. (2 U.S.C.§1609).

Lobbying Contacts and Activities Using IRC Elections (Alternate Reporting Methods)

The LDA permits those organizations that are required to file and do file under 26 U.S.C. § 6033(b)(8) of the Internal Revenue Code (IRC) and organizations that are subject to 26 U.S.C. § 162(e) of the IRC to use the tax law definitions of lobbying in lieu of the LDA definitions for determining “contacts” and “lobbying activities” for Executive Branch lobbying. Registrants should note that the tax definition of lobbying is broader with respect to the type of activities reported, while it is narrower with respect to the universe of Executive Branch officials who qualify as covered Executive Branch employees.

Pursuant to the LDA, registrants making such an IRC election under the LDA must use the IRC definition for Executive Branch lobbying, and the LDA definitions for Legislative Branch lobbying. Because there are fewer Executive Branch officials under the IRC definitions than under the LDA definitions, this may result in fewer individuals being listed as lobbyists and fewer lobbying contacts reflected on the quarterly activity report (LD-2).

Also note that definitions under the tax code include “grass-roots” and “state” lobbying, while the LDA excludes those types of lobbying from the definition of “lobbying activities,” and the LDA does not permit modification of the tax code definition to exclude such expenditures when reporting lobbying expenses under IRC definitions.

Relationship Between 20 Percent of Time and Monetary Threshold

If the definition of “lobbyist” is satisfied with respect to at least one individual for a particular client, the potential registrant (either a lobbying firm or an organization employing the lobbyist, or a self-employed individual lobbyist) is not required to register if it does not meet the monetary thresholds of 2 U.S.C. § 1603(a)(3)(A)(i) , in the case of a “lobbying firm,” or of 2 U.S.C. § 1603(a)(3)(A)(ii) , in the case of an organization employing in-house lobbyists. Note that the monetary exemption is computed based on the lobbying activities of the potential registrant as a whole for the particular client in question, not simply on the lobbying activities of those individuals who are “lobbyists.”

Example 1: A law firm has two lawyers who perform services for a particular client. Lawyer “A” spends 15 percent of the time she works for that client on lobbying activities, including some lobbying contacts. Lawyer “B” spends 25 percent of the time he works for the client on lobbying activities, but makes no lobbying contacts. Neither lawyer falls within the definition of “lobbyist,” and therefore the law firm is not required to register for that client, even if the income it receives for lobbying activities on behalf of the client exceeds $3,000.

Example 2: Employee “A” of a trade association is a lobbyist who spends 25 percent of his time on lobbying activities on behalf of the association. There are $7,500 of expenses related to Employee “A’s” lobbying activities. Employee “B” is not a “lobbyist” but engages in lobbying activities in support of lobbying contacts made by Employee “A.” There are $7,500 of additional expenses related to the lobbying activities of Employee “B.” The trade association is required to register because it employs a “lobbyist” and its total expenses in connection with lobbying activities on its own behalf exceed $14,000.

Example 3: Same as Example 2, except the expenses related to the lobbying activities of Employees “A” and “B” total only $10,000, but the trade association also pays $5,000 to an outside firm for lobbying activities. Registration is still required because payments to outside contractors (including lobbying firms that may be separately registered under the LDA), must be included in the total expenses of an organization employing lobbyists on its own behalf. Also note that lobbyists employed by the outside firm are not listed on the trade association’s registration (LD-1) or quarterly activity report (LD-2). Lobbyists employed by the outside firm must be reported on the outside firm’s quarterly activity report (LD-2).

The registration requirement of a potential registrant is triggered either (1) on the date its employee/lobbyist is employed or retained to make more than one lobbying contact on behalf of the client (and meets the 20 percent of time threshold), or (2) on the date their employee/lobbyist (who meets the 20 percent of time threshold) in fact makes a second lobbying contact, whichever is earlier. In either case, registration is required within 45 days of that date.

Example: Lobbying Firm “A” is retained to monitor an issue, but whether or not lobbying contacts will be made depends on future legislative developments. In another case, Corporation “B,” which employs an in-house lobbyist, knows that its lobbyist will make contacts but reasonably expects its lobbying expenditures will not amount to $14,000 in a quarterly period. However, issues of interest to “B” turn out to be more controversial than expected, and the $14,000 threshold is in fact met a month later.

Lobbying firm “A” has no registration requirement at the present time. The requirement to register is triggered if and when the firm makes contacts, or reasonably expects that it will make contacts. Corporation “B’s” registration requirement arose as soon as it knew, or reasonably expected, that its lobbying expenditures will exceed $14,000. “B” needs to register immediately.

The LDA requires registrants to identify the name of each employee of the registrant who acted or is expected to act as a lobbyist on behalf of the client. Contract lobbyists who are not employed by the registrant should not be listed on the LDA registration or quarterly activity reports.

Further, if any employee who is listed as a lobbyist has served as a covered executive branch official or a covered legislative branch official in the 20 years before the date on which the employee first acted as a lobbyist for that client, the LDA registration (LD-1) or quarterly activity report (LD-2) must list the position in which the employee served. Please note that it is not appropriate to list an individual lobbyist’s current position (such as company president, CEO, etc.) in the “Covered Position” field on the registration form (LD-1) or the quarterly activity report (LD-2).

When a lobbyist name is added after the registration form (LD-1) has been submitted for a client, the lobbyist name should be added on the next quarterly activity report (LD-2), along with disclosure of any previous service as a covered executive branch official or a covered legislative branch official in the 20 years before the date on which the employee first acted as a lobbyist for that client.

The LDA requires that registrations contain the name, address, and principal place of business of any organization (other than the registrant’s client) that contributes more than $5,000 to the registrant or the client during the quarterly period to fund the lobbying activities of the registrant and that actively participates in the planning, supervision, or control of such lobbying activities 2 U.S.C. § 1603(b)(3) . Such organizations are known as “affiliated organizations.”

However, no such disclosure is required under paragraph (3) if the organization that would be identified as affiliated with the client is listed on the client’s publicly accessible internet website as a member of or a contributor to the client—unless the organization in whole or in major part plans, supervises, or controls such lobbying activities. To use this option, the registrant must list on its registration the specific internet address of the web page containing the information that is being relied on 2 U.S.C. § 1603(b) .

The LDA requires the reporting of “any changes or updates to the information provided in the initial registration, including information under section 1603(b)(3)[.]” 2 U.S.C. § 1604(b)(1) . Therefore, if for any reason the web page at an address listed on a registration no longer includes all of the information required for the LDA website option, the registration must be updated. To update the listing of such websites, or otherwise update information concerning affiliated organizations, use the Client Information Update on the quarterly activity report (LD-2) or submit a registration (LD-1) amendment. Registrants, including those using the website option, are responsible for ensuring that their registration remains up to date regarding affiliated organizations and all other required information.

Listing Foreign Entities

Each registration must contain the name, address, principal place of business, amount of any contribution greater than $5,000 to the lobbying activities of the registrant, and approximate percentage of ownership in the client of any foreign entity that: holds at least 20 percent equitable ownership in the client or any affiliate of the client required to be reported; or directly or indirectly, in whole or major part, plans, supervises, controls, directs, finances, or subsidizes the activities of the client or affiliate of the client required to be reported; or is an affiliate of either the client, or an organization affiliated with the client identified on the registration (LD-1) and has a direct interest in the outcome of the lobbying activity. The purpose of the disclosure is to identify the interests of the foreign entity that may be operating behind the registrant or client.

Example: Lobbying Firm “A” is retained to lobby on behalf of Company “B,” which is wholly owned by Foreign Company “C.” “C” is wholly owned by Foreign Company “D,” and “D” is wholly owned by Foreign Company “E.” “C,” “D,” and “E” must be disclosed on the registration.

Disclosure of Certain Convictions

The Justice Against Corruption on K Street Act of 2018 (the JACK Act) amended the LDA, effective January 3, 2019. The Act requires all registrations (LD-1) and quarterly activity reports (LD-2) to include:

The LDA online filing system provides fields for reporting information required by the JACK Act (Line 15 on the LD-1 registration and Line 29 on the LD-2 quarterly activity report).

To comply with this statutory requirement and ensure the accuracy and completeness of the disclosure, all registrants must list the required information for every listed lobbyist with any prior conviction of an offense involving one of the JACK Act’s listed predicates (a “predicate offense”).

To satisfy the “description of the offense,” for every date upon which a conviction involving a predicate offense occurred for a listed lobbyist, you must indicate for that lobbyist, the jurisdiction of offense (federal judicial district or the specific county or municipal jurisdiction in which a State conviction is on record) and either a list of which predicate offenses from the list above were involved in the lobbyist’s conviction, or each code section under which the lobbyist was convicted of a predicate offense.

Example 1: A listed lobbyist was convicted in the United States District Court for the District of Columbia on January 1, 1970 of 22 counts of violating the Hobbs Act through extortion, 5 counts of making a false statement, 1 count of conspiracy to make a false statement, and the nature of those offenses also involved tax evasion and receiving illegal kickbacks. The registrant lists the lobbyist name and the date of conviction and could list the following description: U.S. District Court (DDC), offenses involving extortion, making a false statement, tax evasion, and receiving an illegal kickback.

In that same instance, the registrant could also list the lobbyist name, the date of conviction and the following description: U.S. District Court (DDC), 18 U.S.C. §1951 (22 counts); U.S. District Court (DDC), 18 U.S.C. §1001 (5 counts); U.S. District Court (DDC), 18 U.S.C. §371

Example 2: A listed lobbyist has convictions in state court of two counts of Public Bribery and one count of False Accounting, and the nature of the False Accounting conviction involved making a false statement, fraud, and money laundering. The registrant lists the lobbyist name, the date of conviction and could list the following description: State of East Hypothetica, City of Example Criminal Court, offenses involving bribery, false statements, fraud, and money laundering.

In that same instance, the registrant could also list the lobbyist name, the date of conviction and the following description: State of East Hypothetica, City of Example Criminal Court, EH Rev. Stat. §37:206 (2 counts); State of East Hypothetica, City of Example Criminal Court, EH Rev. Stat. §37:1309

Once a JACK Act disclosure is required for a listed lobbyist, that disclosure will be required on every future registration or quarterly report that includes that lobbyist. Please be advised that making false statements on LDA filings, or intentionally omitting required information from LDA filings, may constitute a violation of federal law.

Our offices cannot give legal advice or opinions. For questions regarding whether a conviction involves a predicate offense, or which predicate offenses it may involve, filers may wish to consult with private counsel.

Section 5 – Special Registration Circumstances

Elaboration on the definition of client.

In some cases a registrant is retained as part of a larger lobbying effort that encompasses more than one lobbying firm on behalf of a third party. Generally, the entity that is paying the registrant is listed as the client on behalf of the third party. The third party, who is paying the intermediary (client), is listed also on the registration (LD-1) as an affiliate.

Example: Client “P” retains lobbying firm “F” for general lobbying purposes, but has a new interest in obtaining an outcome in an area new to “P.” “F” realizes that a boutique lobbying firm “L” has an excellent track record for obtaining the type of outcome “P” is seeking, and talks to “P” about subcontracting. “P” agrees with “F’s” strategy. “F” contacts “L” to retain the latter to do the project. “F” is responsible for paying “L.” Within 45 days, “L” registers disclosing “F on behalf of P” as the client, and listing “P” as the affiliate on the registration (LD-1).

Lobbying Firms Retained Under a Contingent Fee

Law other than the LDA governs whether a firm may be retained on a contingent-fee basis. There is, for example, a general prohibition on the payment of contingent fees in connection with the award of government contracts. Assuming, however, that the agreement is not contrary to law or public policy, an agreement to make lobbying contacts for a contingent fee, like other fee arrangements, triggers a registration requirement at inception. The fee is disclosed on the quarterly activity report (LD-2) for the period that the registrant becomes entitled to it.

Example 1: On January 1, 2015, Lobbying Firm “G” agrees to lobby for Client “H” for a fee contingent on a certain result, and the agreement is permitted under other applicable law . Lobbying activities begin. “G” is required to register by February 14, 2015. The result is not obtained and “G” is not entitled to any fee during the first quarterly period. “G” must report its lobbying activities for the first quarterly period; the income reported is “Less than $5,000.” The desired result does occur in the second quarterly period of 2015. In the report for that period, “G” discloses its lobbying activities for that period and the total contingent fee in income reported, rounded to the nearest $10,000.

Example 2: Lobbying Firm “J” discusses an arrangement to accept stock options worth $4,500 from Client “M” in lieu of payment of a contingency fee. After determining that acceptance of a success fee is not a violation of another statute, “J” signs a contract with “M,” and registers. Late in the first quarter of the lobbying activities, it appeared “J” achieved the result. “J’s” initial quarterly lobbying report disclosed lobbying income of less than $5,000. “M’s” stock value increased shortly thereafter to be valued at $6,000, so “J” exercised its options. “J” amended the previously filed quarterly report to reflect income of “$5,000 or more,” and rounded the amount to $10,000.

Registration for Entities with Subsidiaries or State and Local Affiliates

Assuming a parent entity or national association and its subsidiary or subordinate are separate legal entities, the parent makes a determination whether it meets the registration threshold based upon its own activities, and does not include subordinate units' lobbying activities in its assessment. Each subordinate must make its own assessment as to whether any of its own employees meet the definition of a lobbyist, and then determine if it meets the registration threshold with respect to lobbying expenses.

Example: Lobbyist “Z” is an employee of Company “A,” which is a wholly owned subsidiary of Company “B.” “Z’s” lobbying activities advance the interests of both. Which company is responsible for registering and reporting under the LDA?

The registration and reporting requirements apply to the organization of which Lobbyist “Z” is an employee. Therefore, Company “A” would register and file the quarterly reports.

If Company “B” contributes $5,000 or more to “Z’s” lobbying activities during a quarterly period and actively participates in the planning, supervision, or control of the lobbying activities, Company “B” must be listed on Company “A’s” registration (LD-1). A contribution may take any form, and may be direct or indirect. For example, if Company “B” established Company “A” with an initial capital contribution of $1,000,000, which “A” draws upon for employee salaries, including “Z’s,” and to pay for office space used by “Z,” a $5,000 contribution probably has been made.

If Company “B” is a foreign entity, and the facts are otherwise the same as above, “B” would be listed as an affiliate on the registration (LD-1) filed by Company “A.” “B’s” interests in specific lobbying issues would also be disclosed on the quarterly activity report (LD-2).

The LDA does not make any express provision for combined or consolidated filings. A single filing by a parent corporation may be appropriate in some cases, especially when there are multiple subsidiaries and the lobbyists address the same issues for all and act under the close control of the parent. In this regard, note that the LDA does not contain any specific definition of “employee” (there is only the general definition at 2 U.S.C. § 1602(5) ), and the policy of the LDA is to promote disclosure of real parties in interest.

In circumstances in which multiple subsidiaries each have only a fraction of the lobbyist’s time and little control over his work, the parent which in fact exercises actual control can be regarded as the “employer” for lobbying registration purposes. In such cases, the parent may file a single registration, provided that the registration (LD-1) discloses that the listed lobbyists are employees of subsidiaries and the subsidiaries are identified as affiliated organizations.

Effect of Mergers and Acquisitions on Registrations

The following examples serve to illustrate hypothetical situations regarding mergers and acquisitions:

Example 1: Corporation “C” registered under the LDA during 2014. Effective upon close of business on December 31, 2014, “C” merged with Corporation “D.” “D,” the surviving corporation, had no lobbyist employees before the merger and is not registered. How and when should this information be reported? Assuming that “D” retains at least one of “C’s” lobbyist employees and will incur lobbying expenses of at least $14,000 during the January – March quarterly period, Corporation “D” is required to register. The 45 day period in which its initial registration must be filed begins to run on December 31, 2014, the date “D” first had lobbyist employees, and the registration is due by February 14, 2015. On the other hand, if “D” will not be lobbying after the merger, it is not required to register. In pre merger discussions, Corporation “C” might have agreed to terminate its registration and file its final lobbying report before ceasing its corporate existence. If, however, “C” did not do so, Corporation “D” should terminate the registration and file the outstanding lobbying report in “C’s” name. “D” may simply annotate the signature block on the quarterly activity report (LD 2) to indicate that it is filing as successor in interest to “C.”

Example 2: Lobbying Firm “O” is a registrant under the LDA. It merges with Lobbying Firm “P,” which is also a registrant. The new entity will be known as Lobbying Firm “T.” How and when should this information be reported? The answer depends on the particular facts. If Lobbying Firm “T” is a newly created legal entity, it should file a new registration within 45 days. The registrations of both “O” and “P” should be terminated by filing separate termination reports for each remaining registrant/client relationship. But if “T” is simply the new name adopted by “O” following the merger with “P,” with “P” going out of existence, “O” should report its new name and other updated information (such as the names of lobbyist employees of “P” who are retained or hired by “T”) on the quarterly activity report (LD-2). “P’s” registration should be terminated, and P should file termination reports for each remaining registrant/client relationship, but only after P ceases to exist.

Example 3: Corporation “J,” a registrant, acquired Corporation “K,” a non registrant. At the time of the acquisition, “J” changed its name to “J & K.” How and when should this information be reported? For LDA purposes, this is simply a change in the name of the registrant. The change should be reported on the next quarterly activity report (LD-2) with the registrant name listed as “J & K, formerly reported as J."

Associations or Coalitions

The LDA provides that “[i]n the case of a coalition or association that employs or retains other persons to conduct lobbying activities, the client is the coalition or association and not its individual members” ( 2 USC § 1602(2) ). A bona fide coalition that employs or retains lobbyists on behalf of the coalition may be the client for LDA reporting purposes, even if the coalition is not a legal entity or has no formal name. A registrant lobbying for an unnamed informal coalition needs to adopt some type of identifier for the registration (LD-1), and indicate “(Informal Coalition)” or another applicable description. For all coalitions and associations, formal or informal, the LDA requires further disclosures, e.g., of organizations other than the client that contribute more than $5,000 toward the lobbying activities of the registrant in the quarterly period, and actively participate in the planning, supervision, or control of the lobbying activities ( 2 U.S.C. § 1603(b)(3) ). Such organizations are identified as affiliates on the registration (LD-1).

Example 1: Association “A” has 20 organizational members who each pay $20,000 as a portion of their annual dues to fund “A’s” lobbying activities. “E” is an employee of Organization “O,” which is a member of “A.” “E” serves as a member of “A’s” board, as a representative of “O.” While “A” carries out various functions, a substantial part of its mission is lobbying on issues of interest to its member organizations. “E’s” board membership constitutes active participation by “O” in the lobbying activities of “A,” and thus “O” would need to be listed as an affiliated organization of “A.”

Example 2: Another association “A” has 1000 organizational members who each pay $20,000 as a portion of their annual dues to fund “A’s” lobbying activities. “E” is an employee of Organization “O,” which is a member of “A.” “E” serves as a member of “A’s” board, as a representative of “O.” “A” performs numerous functions, only a modest portion of which is lobbying. With regard to “A’s” lobbying activities, “A’s” board is only involved in approving an overall budget for such activities, but otherwise leaves supervision, direction, and control of such matters to a separate committee of member organizations. “E’s” board membership in this case does not constitute active participation by “O” in the lobbying activities of “A.”

Example 3: Another association “A” has 1000 organizational members who each pay $1,000 a month in annual dues to “A.” “E” is an employee of Organization “O,” which is a member of “A.” “E” serves as a member of “A’s” lobbying oversight group as a representative of “O.” The lobbying oversight group plans and supervises lobbying strategy for “A.” While “E’s” activities in “A” would constitute active participation, because “O” does not contribute $5,000 in the reporting quarter to the lobbying activities of “A,” “O” would not need to be listed as an affiliate of “A.”

Example 4: Another association “A” has 100 organizational members who each pay $30,000 a month as a portion of their annual dues to fund “A’s” lobbying activities. “E” is an employee of Organization “O,” and attends “A’s” annual meeting/conference, informally provides “O’s” list of legislative priorities to “A,” and also facilitates responses from “O” to occasional requests for information by “A’s” lobbyists. These activities would not make “O” an active participant in the lobbying activities of “A.”

Example 5: Organization “O” joins with a group of nine other organizations to form Coalition “C” to lobby on an issue of interest to it. Each contributes $50,000 to “C’s” budget. “O’s” vice president for government relations is part of the informal group that directs the lobbying strategy for “C.” “O” would be considered an active participant in “C’s” lobbying activities and would have to be disclosed.

Note that a coalition with a foreign entity as a member must identify the foreign entity on the registration (LD-1) if the foreign entity meets the test of either 2 U.S.C. § 1603(b)(3) or (b)(4) .

Churches, Integrated Auxiliaries, Conventions or Association of Churches and Religious Orders – Hiring of Outside Firms

Although the definition of a lobbying contact does not include a communication made by a church, its integrated auxiliary, a convention or association of churches and religious orders ( 2 U.S.C. § 1602(8)(B)(xviii) ), if a church (its integrated auxiliary, a convention or association of churches, and religious orders) hires an outside firm that conducts lobbying activity on its behalf, the outside firm must register if registration is otherwise required.

Registration of Professional Associations of Elected Officials

The LDA ( 2 U.S.C. § 1602(15) ) definition of “public official” includes a professional association of elected officials who are exempt from registration. If the association retains an outside firm to lobby, the lobbying firm must register if otherwise required to do so, i.e., the firm employs a lobbyist as defined in 2 U.S.C. § 1602(10) and lobbying income exceeds $3,000 in a quarterly period.

Section 6 – Quarterly Reporting of Lobbying Activities

When and why a report is needed.

Each registrant must file a quarterly activity report (LD-2) no later than 20 days (or on the first business day after such 20th day if the 20th day is not a business day) after the end of the quarterly period beginning on the first day of January, April, July, and October of each year in which a registrant is registered. Lobbying firms file separate reports for each client for each quarterly reporting period, while organizations employing in-house lobbyists file one report covering their in-house lobbying activities for each quarterly reporting period. All reports must be filed electronically. The Secretary and Clerk do not have the authority under the LDA to grant extensions to registrants.

The obligation to report under the LDA arises from active status as a registrant (with a registration on file for which a termination report has not been filed). The LDA ( 2 U.S.C. § 1604(a) ) requires a registrant to file a report for the quarterly period in which it incurred its registration requirement , and for each quarterly period thereafter, through and including the reporting period encompassing the date of registration termination. A timely quarterly activity report (LD-2) is required even though the registration was in effect for only part of the reporting period. So long as a registration is on file and has not been terminated, a registrant must report its lobbying activities even if those activities during a particular quarterly period would not trigger a registration requirement in the first instance (e.g., a lobbying firm’s income from a client amounted to less than $3,000 during a particular quarterly period). A registrant with no lobbying activity during a quarterly period checks the “no activity” box on the quarterly activity report (LD-2).

Example 1: “A” is the only lobbyist of Lobbying Firm “Z” listed in the registration filed for Client “Y” on February 14, 2015. During January–March 2015, “A” lobbied for “Y” nearly full‑time. During the April–June period in 2015, however, “A” made only one lobbying contact for “Y” in April, but lobbying fees for the quarter were $10,000. For the April–June quarterly period, even though “A” had minimal lobbying activities, Lobbying Firm “Z” must report “A’s” lobbying activities (due to “A’s” being listed as a lobbyist) and must report the $10,000 lobbying fees.

Example 2: Lobbying Firm “Z” is retained by Client “X” on June 1, 2015 for 30 days to lobby on a particular issue that is on the legislative calendar and the issue is settled prior to the departure of House and Senate Members for the July 4th recess. Firm “Z” must file its registration by July 15, file its quarterly activity report (LD-2) by July 20, and, if it chooses to terminate, file its termination report by October 20.

Disclosing that a Client is a State or Local Government or Instrumentality

A client that is a state or local government or instrumentality must be disclosed as such on the quarterly activity report (LD-2).

Mandatory Electronic Filing

Mandatory electronic filing of all documents is required by the LDA ( 2 U.S.C. § 1604 ). The only exception to mandatory electronic filing is for the purpose of compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). The online electronic filing system provides usability for people with vision impairments who have the appropriate software and hardware. If you have questions regarding additional ADA accommodations, please contact the Senate Office of Public Records at (202) 224-0758 or the House Legislative Resource Center at 202-226-5200.

Preparing to File the Quarterly Report – Income or Expense Recording

The LDA does not contain any special record keeping provisions, but requires, in the case of an outside lobbying firm (including self-employed individuals), a good faith estimate of all income received from the client, other than payments for matters unrelated to lobbying activities. In the case of an organization employing in-house lobbyists, the LDA requires a good faith estimate of the total expenses of its lobbying activities. As long as the registrant has a reasonable system in place and complies in good faith with that system, the requirement of reporting expenses or income would be met. Since the LDA ( 2 U.S.C. § 1605(a)(5) ) requires the Secretary and Clerk to “retain registrations for a period of at least 6 years after they are terminated and reports for a period of at least 6 years after they are filed,” it is recommended registrants retain copies of their filings and supporting documentation for the same length of time.

Lobbying Firm Income

Lobbying firms report income earned or accrued from lobbying activities during a quarterly period, even though the client may not be billed or make payment until a later time. For a lobbying firm, gross income from the client for lobbying activities is reportable, including reimbursable expenses, costs, or disbursements that are in addition to fees and separately invoiced. The quarterly activity report (LD-2) provides boxes for a lobbying firm to report income of less than $5,000, or of $5,000 or more. If lobbying income is $5,000 or more, a lobbying firm must provide a good faith estimate of the actual dollar amount rounded to the nearest $10,000.

Example: Lobby Firm “A” has lobbying income of $5,700 from Client “Z” for the first quarter of 2015. “A” files a quarterly activity report (LD-2) for Client “Z” by April 20, checking the box for “$5,000 or More” in income and reporting the amount of income (rounded to the nearest $10,000) as $10,000.

Organization Expenses Using LDA Expense Reporting Method

Organizations that employ in-house lobbyists may incur lobbying-related expenses in the form of employee compensation, office overhead, or payments to vendors, which may include lobbying firms. Organizations must report expenses as they are incurred, though payment may be made later. The quarterly activity report (LD-2) provides for an organization to report lobbying expenses of less than $5,000, or $5,000 or more. If lobbying expenses are $5,000 or more, the organization must provide a good faith estimate of the actual dollar amount rounded to the nearest $10,000. Organizations using the LDA expense reporting method mark the “Method A” box on the quarterly activity report (LD-2).

To ensure complete reporting, the Secretary and Clerk have consistently interpreted 2 U.S.C. § 1604(b)(4) to require such organizations to report all of their expenses incurred in connection with lobbying activities, including all payments to retained lobby firms or outside entities, without considering whether any particular payee has a separate obligation to register and report under the LDA. Logically, if an organization employing in-house lobbyists also retains a lobbying firm, the expense reported by the organization should be greater than the fees reported by the lobbying firm of which the organization is a client. An organization must contact any other organization to which it pays membership dues in order to learn what portion of the dues is used by the latter organization for lobbying activities. It is necessary for the former organization to include the portion of the dues that is designated for lobbying activities in the total of lobbying expenses reported by the former organization. A registrant cannot apportion the lobbying expense part of the dues to avoid disclosure. Dues payments for lobbying activities should be included in the estimate for the quarter in which they are paid.

All employee time spent in lobbying activities must be included in determining the organization’s lobbying expenses, even if the employee does not meet the statutory definition of a “lobbyist.”

Example: The CEO of a registrant, “Defense Contractor,” travels to Washington to meet with a covered DOD official regarding the renewal of a government contract. “Defense Contractor” has already determined that its CEO is not a “lobbyist,” because he does not spend 20 percent of his time on “lobbying activities” during a quarterly period. Nonetheless, the expenses reasonably allocable to the CEO’s lobbying activities (e.g., plane ticket to Washington, salary and benefit costs, etc.) will be reportable.

Similarly, all expenses of lobbying activities incurred during a quarterly period are reportable. The LDA definition of lobbying activities (2 U.S.C. § 1602(7) ) is not limited to lobbying contacts. Examples of lobbying expenses to be included are reflected below.

Example 1: A research assistant in the Washington office of the registrant, “Defense Contractor” (described in the example above) researches and prepares the talking points for the CEO’s lobbying contact with the covered DOD official. Likewise, the expenses reasonably allocable to the research assistant’s lobbying activities will be included in “Defense Contractor’s” expense estimate for the quarterly period.

Example 2: Corporation “R” is a registrant that is interested in building a bypass around a city in state “S.” “R’s” governmental affairs team is comprised of lobbyists who are federally-focused, and lobbyists who are state-focused. The entire staff prepares a strategic lobbying plan to support the building of the bypass. This includes both federal and state lobbying. In this example, the time spent by the state level lobbyists preparing the materials would be included in “R’s” good faith estimate of lobbying expenses for the quarter because, at the time the materials were prepared, they were to be used for federal lobbying.

Example 3: Same circumstances as Example 2, but in this situation, the aforementioned strategic lobbying plan includes hiring one firm to help with the production of the plan, and another firm to place advertising in media in “S” to encourage citizens in “S” to contact their representatives about the importance of building the bypass. The total cost of producing the plan, but not the cost of the advertising media fees, must be included in “R’s” good faith estimate of lobbying expenses for the quarter.

The examples below are intended to be illustrative of the possibilities of LDA expense reporting, and are not intended to require detailed accounting rules.

Example 1: An organization employing in-house lobbyists might choose to estimate lobbying expenses by asking each professional staffer to track his/her percentages of time devoted to lobbying activities. These percentages could be averaged to compute the percentage of the organization's total effort (and budget) that is devoted to lobbying activities. Under this example the organization would include salary costs (including a percentage of support staff salaries), overhead, and expenses, including any third-party costs attributable to lobbying.

Example 2: Another organization, which lobbies out of its Washington office, might avoid the need for detailed breakdowns by including the entire budget or expenses (whichever the organization believes in good faith is closer to the actual amount) of its Washington office. Care should be taken in this instance to also add any additional lobbying expenses to this amount, such as the cost of fly-ins, events, etc., and outside lobbyists not paid by the Washington office.

Organizations Reporting Expenses Under 2 U.S.C. § 1610 (Optional IRC Reporting Methods)

The LDA ( 2 U.S.C. § 1610(a) ) allows entities that are required to report and do report lobbying expenditures under 26 U.S.C § 6033(b)(8) of the Internal Revenue Code to use IRC definitions for purposes of the LDA ( 2 U.S.C. § 1603(a)(3) and 2 U.S.C. § 1604(b)(4) ). Charitable organizations, as described in 26 U.S.C. § 501(c)(3) , are required to report to the Internal Revenue Service their lobbying expenditures in conformity with 26 U.S.C. § 6033(b)(8) of the IRC. They may treat as LDA expenses the amounts they treat for influencing legislation under the IRC.

The LDA ( 2 U.S.C. § 1610(b) ) allows entities that are subject to the IRC ( 26 U.S.C. § 162(e) ) to use IRC definitions for purposes of 2 U.S.C. § 1603(a)(3) and 2 U.S.C. § 1604(b)(4) . The eligible entities include for-profit organizations (other than lobbying firms) and tax-exempt organizations such as trade associations that calculate their lobbying expenses for IRC purposes with reference to 26 U.S.C. § 162(e) rules. The Secretary and the Clerk believe that this reporting option is available to include also a small number of trade association registrants not required by the IRC to report non-deductible lobbying expenses to their members (i.e., those whose members are tax-exempt).

If an eligible organization elects to report under 2 U.S.C. § 1610 , it must do so consistently for all reports covering a calendar year. The electing organization also must report all expenses that fall within the applicable Internal Revenue Code definition. The total that is ultimately reportable to the Internal Revenue Service is the figure that would be used for the quarterly activity report. The quarterly activity report (LD-2) would require any organization to report if the amount of lobbying expenses was less than $5,000, or $5,000 or more. If the expense amount is $5,000 or more, it should be rounded to the nearest $10,000. The quarterly activity report (LD-2) also requires the electing organization to mark as applicable, either the “Method B” box ( 26 U.S.C. § 6033(b)(8) ) or the “Method C” box ( 26 U.S.C. § 162(e) ).

The Secretary and Clerk are aware that the IRC and LDA are not harmonized in terms of expense reporting. Registrants are advised that if they elect to report under IRS methods per 2 U.S.C. § 1610 , they may not subtract lobbying expenses for lobbying state and local officials and grassroots lobbying from the total expenses reported. Doing so alters the IRS reportable total, and is not permitted.

Quarterly Reporting of Lobbying Activities - Contents of Report

The LDA ( 2 U.S.C. § 1604(b) ) requires registrants to report specific information on the nature of the lobbying activities on quarterly activity reports (LD-2), including:

  • Disclosing the general lobbying issue area code(s).
  • Identifying the specific issues on which the lobbyist(s) engaged in lobbying activities.
  • Identifying the Houses of Congress and the most specific Federal Agencies contacted.
  • Disclosing the lobbyists who had any activity in the general issue area.
  • Describing the interest of a foreign entity if applicable.

Example 1: Registrant “A” represents Client “B” to monitor an issue of interest to B and make occasional lobbying contacts as necessary. During the Q1 2015 reporting period, “A” received $3,000 from “B,” but had no lobbying activity because “B’s” issue was dormant. “A” would complete the quarterly activity report (LD-2), mark the box for “No Lobbying Activity,” mark income as “Less than $5,000,” and submit the report.

Example 2: Same circumstances as above, except that “A” has two lobbyists who make lobbying contacts on a single lobbying issue with the Senate and the House. In this case, “A” will need to complete the Lobbying Activity section of the quarterly activity report (LD-2) and submit the report.

Example 3: Same circumstances as example 2, but one of the lobbyists retires during the reporting period. In this case, the Information Update Page of the quarterly activity report is required to be included, listing the lobbyist’s name as being no longer expected to lobby for that client, which has the effect of delisting the lobbyist’s name (his/her retirement) from “A’s” registration and reports.

When reporting specific lobbying issues, some registrants have listed only House or Senate bill numbers on the issues page without further indication of their clients’ specific lobbying issues. Such disclosures are not adequate, for several reasons. First, 2 U.S.C. § 1604(b)(2)(A) requires disclosure of “specific issues upon which a lobbyist employed by the registrant engaged in lobbying activities, including ... bill numbers[.]” As we read the law, a bill number is a required disclosure when the lobbying activities concern a bill, but is not in itself a complete disclosure. Further, in many cases, a bill number standing alone does not inform the public of the client’s specific issue. Many bills are lengthy and complex, or may contain various provisions that are not always directly related to the main subject or title. If a registrant’s client is interested in only one or a few specific provisions of a much larger bill, a lobbying report containing a mere bill number will not disclose the specific lobbying issue. Even if a bill concerns only one specific subject, a lobbying report disclosing only a bill number is still inadequate, because a member of the public would need access to information outside of the filing to ascertain that subject. The LDA contemplates disclosures that are adequate to inform the public of the lobbying client’s specific issues from a review of the quarterly activity report (LD-2), without independent familiarity with bill numbers or the client’s interest in specific subject matters within larger bills. The disclosures on the quarterly activity report must include bill numbers, where applicable, but must always contain information that is adequate, standing alone, to inform the public of the specific lobbying issues.

Example: Client “A’s” general lobbying issue area is “Environment.” During the first quarter of 2015, lobbyists for “A” made contacts concerning the Department of Defense appropriations for environmental restoration. For fiscal year 2016, the Department of Defense Appropriations Act was part of the Omnibus Consolidated Appropriations Act for 2016, H.R. 3610, a lengthy and complex bill that did not have numbered sections throughout. Title II contained separate but unnumbered provisions making appropriations for “Environmental Restoration, Army,” “Environmental Restoration, Navy,” “Environmental Restoration, Air Force,” “Environmental Restoration, Defense Wide,” and “Environmental Restoration, Formerly Used Defense Sites.” Lobbying contacts for Client “A” addressed all environmental restoration funding within the Defense Department bill. An appropriate disclosure of the specific lobbying issue would read as follows: H.R. 3610, Department of Defense Appropriations Act for 2016, Title II, all provisions relating to environmental restoration.

The Tariff (TAR) issue code is used for tariff bills, including miscellaneous tariff bills. Filers must use this general issue area code to report lobbying activity related to tariff issues, including miscellaneous tariff issues. For any other trade-related issues, filers should use the Trade (TRD) code.

Example: Registrant “R’ is retained by Client “B” to pursue a bill to provide a temporary tariff suspension for chemical X, and a separate bill to provide a temporary tariff reduction for chemical Y. During the first quarter of 2015, “R” made lobbying contacts concerning both matters on behalf of “B” and a separate bill was introduced for each matter (S.123 for chemical X and S.456 for chemical Y). “R” reports in its LD-2 filing for Q1 that the general issue area code for these bills is “TAR,” and the specific issues lobbied upon were the substance of the bills, citing to the bill number, if a bill has been introduced (e.g., “temporary tariff suspension for chemical X (S.123) and temporary tariff reduction for chemical Y (S.456)”). In the Q3 reporting period, the two chemical tariff provisions are each rolled into an omnibus bill (e.g., S.789, the “Miscellaneous Tariff Bill”). If “R” had lobbying activities during the Q3 reporting period encompassing all three bills, then “R” reports that the general issue area code for these bills is “TAR” and the specific issues lobbied upon were the substance of the bills (e.g., “temporary tariff suspension for chemical X and temporary tariff reduction for chemical Y, included in the original bills (S.123 and S.456) and in the Miscellaneous Tariff Bill (S.789)”). In Q4, “R” had lobbying activities focusing on the omnibus bill which “R” then discloses on its Q4 report, using TAR for the general issue area code as well as reporting the specific issues lobbied upon (“modification focused on tariff suspension for chemical X and tariff reduction for chemical Y, included in Miscellaneous Tariff Bill (S.789)”).

The Houses of Congress and Federal agencies contacted by lobbyists during the reporting period must be disclosed on the quarterly activity report (LD-2), picking from the list of government entities provided in the online filing system. Registrants should select the most specific Federal Agency possible. If the list does not display the government entity contacted, then select the department in which the entity is housed. In the event that no lobbying contacts were made, the registrant must mark the “No Agencies Lobbied” box.

Previously identified lobbyists and new lobbyists for this reporting period must be listed on the quarterly activity report (LD-2) if they had any lobbying activities during the reporting period, whether or not they made lobbying contacts. The General Issue Area on the quarterly activity report is only intended to reflect lobbying activity by lobbyists , and not activity of those who are not lobbyists. The registrant does not report the names of individuals who may perform some lobbying activities, but who do not and are not expected to meet the definition of a lobbyist.

Example: Lobbying Firm “A” filed its initial registration for Client “B” on February 14, listing Lobbyists “X,” “Y,” and “Z.” From January through March, Lobbyists “W” (hired in February) and “X” and “Y” made contacts for “B,” while Lobbyist “Z” was assigned work for other clients. Lobbyist “Z” is expected, however, to be active on behalf of Client “B” after Spring Recess until adjournment. In its first quarter (LD-2) report for Client “B,” filed on or before April 20, Lobbying Firm “A” lists “W,” “X,” and “Y”as lobbyists. “W” is also identified as “new,” and Firm “A” would disclose if “W” occupied a covered position within the last twenty years. “Z” is not listed on the quarterly activity report (LD-2) filed for Client “B” for the January–March quarterly period, but because of the current expectation that he will lobby during the April–June quarterly period, his name is not delisted as a lobbyist for “B.”

In the case of a registrant organization with in-house lobbyists, which also engages the services of an outside lobbying firm, the names of outside retained lobbyists are not listed on the organization’s registration or quarterly activity reports. However, the registrant’s expenses for such an outside lobbying firm must be part of the registrant’s lobbying expense calculations and disclosure. The outside lobbying firm would file its own report pursuant to the LDA, listing the names of its lobbyists, as appropriate.

New lobbyists must be disclosed in the appropriate General Issue Area for the reporting period in which the individual first meets the definition of lobbyist. Filers need to list a new lobbyist’s previous covered executive or legislative branch positions held within twenty (20) years of first acting as a lobbyist for a client. Once a filer has met the previously described statutory requirement for listing a new lobbyist’s previous covered position(s), then the filer does not have to list those positions again for subsequent reports concerning the same client. If a registrant lists that lobbyist for the first time on a report/registration regarding a different client, then the registrant must list that lobbyist’s previous covered positions held within twenty (20) years of first acting as a lobbyist for the new client.

We are aware that there will be situations in which a registrant expects an individual to become a lobbyist and wishes to disclose the name of that individual as a matter of public record. However, the LDA ( 2 U.S.C. § 1604 ), provides that updated registration information is contained in the registrant’s next quarterly activity report (LD-2). Therefore, there may be a period of time in which an individual is legitimately making lobbying contacts but is not identified on the public record until the next quarterly activity report (LD-2) is filed. In such cases, the registrant reports updated information as the LDA requires.

A foreign entity is reported on the quarterly activity report (LD-2) if both of two circumstances apply: 1) the foreign entity must be an entity that is required to be identified on the registration (LD-1) or on the Information Update page on the quarterly activity report (LD-2). That, in turn, depends on whether the entity meets one of the three conditions of the LDA ( 2 U.S.C. § 1603(b)(4) ); and 2) the entity must have an interest in the specific lobbying issues listed on the quarterly activity report (LD-2). If a foreign entity has an interest in the specific issues, the quarterly activity report (LD-2) requires a description of that interest. For the sake of clarity the registrant should indicate whether the foreign entity(s) is/are the same as identified on the registration. The requirement to disclose a foreign interest is not contingent upon the entity making a contribution of $5,000 or more to the registrant during that particular reporting period.

Example: “[Name of foreign entity], identified on Registration (LD-1), exports [type of product] to United States and would benefit from [specific desired outcome].”

The LDA online filing system provides fields for reporting information required by the JACK Act (Line 15 on the LD-1 registration and Line 29 on the LD-2 quarterly activity report). See Section 4 – Lobbying Registration for additional information about disclosure of convictions.

Section 7 – Semiannual Reporting of Certain Contributions

Registrants and lobbyists must file a semiannual contribution report (LD-203) by July 30 and January 30 (or on the next business day should either day occur on a weekend or holiday) for each semiannual period in which a registrant or lobbyist remains active (and regardless of whether they do or do not make reportable contributions). An “active” registrant is one that has not filed a valid termination report for all clients. An “active” lobbyist is an individual who has been listed on any registration (LD-1) or quarterly activity report (LD-2) and who has not been terminated/delisted by the registrant. If a lobbyist is listed as active on a quarterly activity report (LD-2) for all or any part of a semi-annual period, he or she must file a contribution report (LD-203) for that period (see Guidance Section 8) . 2 U.S.C. § 1604 states that “each person or organization who is registered or is required to register…and each employee who is or is required to be listedas a lobbyist…shall file a report.” Thus, the requirement to file a contribution report (LD-203) falls upon all lobbyists who were listed on a registration (LD-1) or quarterly activity report (LD-2), regardless of whether they were required to be listed (as in the case in which a registrant listed an individual as a lobbyist in an abundance of caution). Any lobbyist who is reported on a registration (LD-1) or quarterly activity report (LD-2) must file a contribution report (LD-203), unless that lobbyist has been terminated/delisted on the quarterly activity report (LD-2) for all clients of the registrant prior to the beginning of the relevant LD-203 filing period. The Secretary and the Clerk view the registration (LD-1) and quarterly activity report (LD-2) as determinative for an individual lobbyist’s obligation to file a contribution report (LD-203).

Sole proprietors and small lobbying firms are reminded that two contribution reports are required: one filed by the registrant and one filed by the listed lobbyist (even if the lobbyist is the registrant and vice versa).

Example: A sole proprietor is registered identifying the sole proprietorship business name as the registrant name. The lobbyist’s name is also listed as a lobbyist on the registration (LD-1) and on subsequent quarterly activity reports (LD-2). When the registrant contribution report (LD-203) is due from the registrant sole proprietorship business organization, the lobbyist contribution report (LD-203) is also due from the individual lobbyist. Two contribution reports must be filed, one report using the registrant login ID and password, and one report using the lobbyist login ID and password.

Filers are expected to use due diligence when filling out and submitting registrations (LD-1), quarterly activity reports (LD-2), and semiannual contribution reports (LD-203). The coverage periods for the semiannual reports are January 1 through June 30, and July 1 through December 31. The Secretary and the Clerk do not have the authority under the LDA to grant extensions for filing lobbying disclosure documents.

The LDA ( 2 U.S.C. § 1604 ) requires mandatory electronic filing of all lobbying registrations and reports. The only exception to mandatory electronic filing is for the purpose of compliance with the ADA. The online electronic filing system provides usability for people with vision impairments who have the appropriate software and hardware. If you have questions or need assistance regarding additional ADA accommodations, please contact the Senate Office of Public Records at (202) 224-0758.

It is necessary for each active lobbyist to obtain his/her individual user identification number and password in order to file semiannual lobbyist contribution reports (LD-203) electronically with the Secretary and Clerk. The registrant must add every lobbyist name into the contribution reporting system (under the Manage Lobbyist tab) in order for the individual lobbyist to obtain an identification number and set up a private password.

Each and every registrant and lobbyist is responsible for maintaining the confidentiality and use of the user password and for all filings made using their assigned user ID and password. Filers should notify the Secretary and Clerk immediately upon learning of any unauthorized use of a user ID and/or password, as it is presumed that filings are made by the filer.

Semiannual Reporting of Certain Contributions - Contents of Report

The core information required by the LDA ( 2 U.S.C. § 1604(d) ) and incorporated into the semiannual contribution report (LD-203) is: (1) certain contributions that are not disclosed in the quarterly activity report (LD-2); and (2) a certification that the filer has read and understands the gift and travel provisions in the Rules of both the House of Representatives and the Senate, and that the filer has not knowingly violated the aforementioned Rules.

The LDA ( 2 U.S.C. § 1604(d) ) requires specific information regarding certain contributions and payments made by the filer (i.e., each active registrant and active lobbyist), as well as any political committee established or controlled by the filer. In determining contributions and/or payments to report, it is important to note that, in some cases, a leadership PAC (as defined by the Federal Election Campaign Act, FECA) or a former leadership PAC (for example, in the case of a lobbyist who was previously a covered official) may be a political committee established, financed, maintained, or controlled by a lobbyist. Also, a political committee that has changed from a principal campaign committee into a multicandidate committee (defined in the FECA) could be considered to have been established by a covered official or federal candidate. Finally, the FECA defines those organizations that may establish separate segregated funds (SSFs).

The LDA ( 2 U.S.C. § 1604(d) ) requires the filer to disclose for itself, and for any political committee the filer establishes or controls:

  • The date, recipient, and amount of funds contributed (including in-kind contributions) to any Federal candidate or officeholder, leadership PAC, or political party committee (registered with the Federal Election Commission), if the aggregate during the period to that recipient equals or exceeds $200. Please note that contributions to state and/or local candidates and committees not required to be registered with the Federal Election Commission need not be disclosed.
  • The date, the name of honoree and/or honorees, the payee(s) and amount of funds paid for an event to honor or recognize a covered Legislative Branch or covered Executive Branch official (except for information required to be disclosed by another entity under 52 U.S.C. § 30104 ).
  • The date, the name of honoree and/or honorees, the payee(s) and amount of funds paid to an entity that is named for a covered Legislative Branch official, or to an entity or person in recognition of such official (except for information required to be disclosed by another entity under 52 U.S.C. § 30104 ).
  • The date, recipient, the name of the covered official, the payee(s) and amount of funds paid to an entity established, financed, maintained, or controlled by a covered Legislative or Executive Branch official or to an entity designated by such official (except for information required to be disclosed by another entity under 52 U.S.C. § 30104 ).
  • A non-voting board member (e.g. honorary or ex-officio) does not control an organization for these purposes. For purposes of the LDA, the term “designated,” for instance, includes a covered legislative branch official’s or covered executive branch official’s directing a charitable contribution in lieu of an honoraria pursuant to House, Senate, or executive branch Ethics rules. It also includes a payment that is directed to an entity by a covered official who is also on the board of the entity. In contrast, a contribution following a mere statement of support or solicitation does not necessarily constitute a reportable event under ( 2 U.S.C. § 1604(d) ), without some further role by a covered official.
  • Please note that a charitable organization established by a person before that person became a covered official and where that covered official has no relationship to the organization after becoming a covered official, is not considered to be one established by a covered official.
  • Please also note that a covered official’s de minimis contribution to a charity (in proportion to the charity’s overall receipts of contributions) is not an indication of financing, maintaining, or controlling the charity (although supplemental facts might require reporting the contribution).
  • The date, the name of honoree and/or honorees, the payee(s) and amount of funds paid for a meeting, retreat, conference, or other similar event held by, or in the name of, one or more covered Legislative Branch or covered Executive Branch officials (except for information required to be disclosed by another entity under 52 U.S.C. § 30104 ). Costs related to non-preferential sponsorship of a multi-candidate primary/general election debate for a particular office do not have to be disclosed on an LD-203 report.
  • The date, the name of honoree, the payee(s) and amount of funds equal to or exceeding $200 paid to each Presidential library foundation and each Presidential inaugural committee. Please note that contributions to the official Presidential Transition Organization (“PTO”) of the President-elect and Vice President-elect are reportable under the Presidential Transition Act and not reportable under the LDA.

In the case of items 2-6 above, if a lobbyist makes a reportable payment but is reimbursed by a registrant, the registrant reports the payment as its own, rather than the lobbyist reporting the payment. This section of the LDA ( 2 U.S.C. § 1604(d) ) is written broadly, and, in light of other legal provisions, it would be prudent to consult with the appropriate Ethics Committee, or the Office of Government Ethics, in order to determine if any event listed above is otherwise prohibited under law, Senate or House Rules, or Executive Branch regulations. For some events, it may be prudent to consult with the Federal Election Commission as well. Please note that the LDA and the Federal Election Campaign Act are not harmonized to contributions of exactly $200.

Example 1: In State “A,” a group of constituents involved in widget manufacturing decide to honor Senator “Y” and Representative “T” with the “Widget Manufacturing Legislative Leaders of 2015” plaques. Registrant “B” is aware that “Y” has checked with the Senate Select Committee on Ethics regarding her ability to accept the award and attend the coffee, and “T” has checked with the House Committee on Ethics. “B” pays caterer “Z” $500 and Hotel “H” $200 to partially fund the event. “B” would report that it paid $500 to “Z” and $200 to “H” on November 20, 2015 for the purpose of an event to honor or recognize “Y” and “T” with the plaques.

Example 2: After checking to discover if the activity is permissible, Lobbyist “C” contributes $300 on June 1, 2015 to Any State University toward the endowment of a chair named for Senator “Y.” “C” would report the information above noting that the payment was made to Any State for the endowment of “Y’s” chair.

Example 3: Senator “Y” has been asked to speak at a conference held in Washington, D.C., sponsored by a professional association of which Registrant “B” is a member. “B” makes a donation of $100 to Charity “X” in lieu of the association paying a speaking fee (i.e., a contribution in lieu of honoraria). “B” would disclose a contribution of $100 on the date of the payment, with the notation that the payment was made as a contribution in lieu of honoraria to an entity designated by “Y.”

Example 4: There is a large regional conference on “Saving Our River,” sponsored by three 501(c)(3) organizations. Senator “Y” and Representative “T” are given “Champions of Our River” awards at a dinner event that is part of the conference. Registrant “B” contributes $3,000 specifically for the costs of the dinner event, paying one of the sponsors directly. At the time of the specific or restricted contribution, “B” was aware that “Y” and “T” would be honorees. Regardless of whether “B” is a sponsor under House or Senate gift rules and although B is not listed on the invitation as a sponsor (or the like) nor is publicly held out as a sponsor (or the like), since “B” partially paid for the cost of the event, “B” would disclose a payment of $3,000 on the relevant date payable to the sponsor with the notation that “Y” and “T” were honored.

Example 5: Registrant “B,” an industry organization, hosts its annual gala dinner and gives a “Legislator of the Year” award to Representative “T.” Revenues from the gala dinner help fund Registrant “B’s” activities throughout the year. Registrant “B” must report: 1) the cost of the event (hotel, food, flowers, etc., but not indirect costs such as host staff salaries and host office overhead); 2), the payee(s) (as a convenience to filers, separate vendors may be aggregated by using the term “various vendors”); and 3) that the event honored Representative “T.” Please note that “B” must still separately report the cost of any item that “B” gave “T.” The fact that the event helped raise funds for the organization does not change the reporting requirement, though it could be noted in the filing.

Example 6: Registrant “B,” an industry organization, has an annual two-day “Washington fly-in” for its members. Among the events for its members is an event on “The Importance of Industry G to the U.S. Economy.” Senator “T” is listed on the invitation as a speaker at the event. Based on these facts alone, Registrant “B” would not need to report the event under this section. For a covered official to speak at such an event would not, in and of itself, form the basis for concluding that the official is to be honored or recognized. Supplemental facts might require reporting the cost of the event. For example, if Senator “T” were given a special award, recognition, or honor (which may not necessarily be through the receipt of a physical object) by the organization at the event, the cost of the event would have to be reported, even if the invitation did not indicate that such would be given. Simply designating a covered official as a “speaker” at an event at which the covered official receives a special award, recognition, or honor, will not permit the filer to avoid or evade reporting the expenses of the event.

Example 7: Senator “Y” and Representative “T” are “honorary co-hosts” of an event sponsored by Registrant “R” to raise funds for a charity, which is not established, financed, maintained, or controlled by either legislator. “Y” and “T’s” passive allowance of their names to be used as “co-hosts,” in and of itself, is not sufficient to be considered “honored or recognized.” The purpose of the event is to raise funds for Charity “V,” not to honor or recognize “Y” or “T.” Nor are these facts (i.e. being passive honorary co-hosts), in and of themselves, sufficient to treat the event as being held “by or in the name” of “Y” or “T.” Supplemental facts might require reporting the cost of the event.

Example 8: Registrant “R” sponsors an event to promote “Widget Awareness.” “The Honorable Cabinet Secretary Z” is listed on the invitation as an “attendee” or “special invitee” but will not receive an honor or award at the event. Based on these facts alone, “R” would not need to include the costs of this event on “R’s” disclosure under this section. Mere listing of “Z’s” anticipated attendance at an event the purpose of which is to promote Widget Awareness, in and of itself, is not sufficient to be considered “honored or recognized”. Use of the phrase “The Honorable” in this context is consistent with widely accepted notions of protocol applicable to referencing certain very senior government officials. Supplemental facts might require reporting the cost of the event. For instance, if “Z” received a special award, honor, or recognition by “R” at the event, “R” would have to report the costs of the event noting that “Z” was being honored or recognized.

Example 9: Registrant “B” buys a table at a dinner event sponsored by a 501(c) organization to honor Representative “T” but Registrant “B” is not considered a sponsor of the event under House and Senate gift rules. Lobbyist “C” pays the $150 individual ticket cost to attend the dinner, but is not considered a sponsor of the event under House and Senate gift rules. The purchase of a table or ticket to another entity’s event, in and of itself, is not sufficient to be considered paying the “cost of an event.” Supplemental facts might require reporting the cost of the event. For example, if (1) “B” or “C” undertake activities such that “B” or “C” becomes a sponsor of the event for House and/or Senate gift rule purposes; or (2) “B” or “ C” purchase enough tickets/tables so that it would appear that they are paying the costs of the event and/or would not appear to be just ticket or table-buyers (regardless of whether “B” or “C” is a sponsor under House or Senate gift rules), then “B” or “C” would need to report the costs incurred by “B” or “C” (as the case may be) for the event, noting that Representative “T” was the honoree. In the case of filers purchasing multiple tickets and/or tables to an event, a case-by-case analysis will be needed to determine if the quantity is such that it would appear that the filer is paying the costs of the event.

Example 10: Lobbyists “C” and “D” serve on the board of a PAC as member and treasurer respectively. As board members, they are in positions that control direction of the PAC’s contributions. Since both are controlling to whom the PAC’s contributions are given, they must disclose applicable contributions of the PAC on their semiannual LD-203 reports. If “C” and “D” serve on the board of a Separate Segregated Fund (SSF), they may report that they are board members of an SSF in lieu of reporting the SSF’s applicable contributions as long as the SSF’s contributions are reported in the connected organization’s semiannual contribution report (LD-203).

Example 11: Registrant “L” holds an annual fundraising event that honors one person from each of the 50 states whom “L” deems to have played a significant role for the cause “L” supports. In 2015, four of the honorees were covered legislative and executive officials. “L” must disclose the total amount that it paid for the event, disclosing in the payee section “various vendors,” and disclosing the names of the four covered officials. Although not required, and thus at its option, “L” could note in the comments section that four of the 50 honorees were covered officials. This section of the LDA ( 2 U.S.C. § 1604(d) ) does not contemplate a breakdown, delineation, or separation of expenses.

Example 12: Registrant “O” is a university. In June 2015, in conjunction with its commencement event, “O” conferred an honorary degree upon Senator “P.” “O” would report all payments relating to the commencement event (chair rental, lunch for honorees, etc.) on its semiannual contribution report (LD-203), listing “various vendors” as the payee, and Senator “P” as the honoree. Although not required, and thus at its option, “O” could comment that “P” received an honorary degree.

The semiannual contribution report (LD-203) requires a certification that the filer has read and is familiar with those provisions of the Standing Rules of the Senate and the Rules of the House of Representatives relating to the provisions of gifts and travel and has not provided, requested, or directed a gift, including travel, with knowledge that receipt of the gift would violate either Chamber’s Rules. Filers check the box to make this certification, and the user’s ID and password verifies the filer’s identity.

Please note that in the case of a registrant, a signatory is an individual who is responsible for the accuracy of the information contained in the lobbying registration or report. In all cases an individual lobbyist is responsible for all information contained in his or her report. Under the LDA ( 2 U.S.C. § 1605 ), the Secretary and Clerk refer to the U.S. Attorney the names of registrants and lobbyists who fail to provide an appropriate response within sixty (60) days to either officer’s written communication rather than the name of the signatory. Both signatories and any third-party preparers should retain appropriate documentation to verify report contents. Third-party preparers should also retain appropriate documentation to demonstrate that they have authorization to make such filings on behalf of all filers (including lobbyist-employees of registrants) using their services.

Each registrant and active lobbyist, regardless of any contribution activity or any lack thereof, must file a semiannual contribution report (LD-203) due to the certification provision.

Section 8 – Termination of a Lobbyist/Termination of a Registrant

Termination/delisting of a lobbyist.

The LDA is not specific as to how far into the future the registrant should project an expectation that an individual will act as a lobbyist. It seems neither realistic nor necessary to expect registrants to make such projections beyond the next succeeding quarterly reporting period. Accordingly, if a registrant reasonably expects an individual to meet the definition of a lobbyist in either the current or next quarterly period, the lobbyist should remain in an “active” status. If a registrant does not believe this to be the case, the lobbyist can be delisted from the list of lobbyists for the registrant or client. A registrant may terminate a lobbyist by delisting the name only when (i) that individual’s lobbying activities on behalf of that client did not constitute at the end of the current quarter, and are not reasonably expected in the upcoming quarter to constitute, 20 percent of the time that such employee is engaged in total activities for that client; or (ii) that individual does not reasonably expect to make further lobbying contacts. In order to properly terminate/delist a lobbyist, the registrant must complete the Information Update page of the quarterly activity report (LD-2), which is used to Update Previously Reported Lobbyist names who are no longer expected to act as lobbyists for the client due to changed job duties, assignments, or employment status. Amending the registration (LD-1) or quarterly activity report (LD-2) to erase a previously listed lobbyist, is not a proper lobbyist termination/delisting. Simply omitting a lobbyist name from a quarterly activity report is not sufficient to terminate/delist a lobbyist name.

Example 1: Lobbying Firm “Y” registers for Client “Z” on March 15, 2015, listing employees “A,” “B,” “C,” and “D” on the registration (LD-1). For the first quarterly reporting period in 2015, “Y” will list “A,” “B,” and “C” on the quarterly activity report (LD-2). “D” has no lobbying activities for that quarterly period, so he would not be listed. During the second quarter of 2015, “D” leaves firm “Y” to start his own lobbying business. For the second quarterly period, “Y” will report that “D” no longer meets the definition of “lobbyist” for Client “Z” and delist “D” in the Information Update page of the quarterly activity report (LD-2).

Example 2: Lobbying Firm “Y” registers for Client “Z” as above listing the aforementioned “A,” “B,” “C,” and “D” as lobbyists on March 15, 2015. One month after registration, “C” and “D,” who engaged in lobbying activities for “Z” as partners of “Y,” decide to leave the partnership effective June 1, 2015. On the Q2 Report for 2015, “Y” would report any lobbying activity for “C” and “D” on the quarterly activity report (LD-2). “Y” would also reflect “C” and “D’s” departure by delisting them on the Information Update page in the same report.

An individual who no longer meets the definition of lobbyist under 2 U.S.C. § 1602(10) can be relieved from having to file a contribution report (LD-203) for future semiannual periods by properly delisting the lobbyist name on the quarterly activity report (LD-2). This is accomplished by the registrant listing such an individual on the Information Update page of the quarterly activity report (LD-2) for each client for which the individual was previously listed. The obligation to file a contribution report (LD-203) arises from being listed as a lobbyist and not being terminated/delisted by the registrant/employer. Thus, if a lobbyist has not been properly terminated/delisted on the Information Update page of the quarterly activity report (LD-2) for every client for which the lobbyist was listed, the Secretary and Clerk will expect to receive a semiannual contribution report from him/her.

Example: Registrant “A” employs Lobbyist “C” who has lobbying activity on behalf of Client “R” in January and February 2015. In March, Lobbyist “C” no longer expects to engage in lobbying activities for “R” or any other client in the firm, although “C” will continue to do non-lobbying consultation for numerous clients. “A” delists Lobbyist “C” as an active lobbyist by listing “C” on the Information Update page of the quarterly activity report (LD-2) for the Q1 reporting period, and “C” is not listed on subsequent quarterly activity reports. However in July, Lobbyist “C” is required to file a contribution report (LD-203) due July 30 disclosing his activity from January 1 through the date of his termination/delisting.

Termination of a Registrant/Client Relationship

Under the LDA ( 2 U.S.C. § 1603(d) ), a lobbying firm may terminate a registration for a particular client when it is no longer employed or retained by that client to conduct lobbying activities and anticipates no further lobbying activities for that client. An organization employing in-house lobbyists may terminate its registration when in-house lobbying activities have ceased and are not expected to resume. Similarly, in situations in which a registration is filed in anticipation of meeting the registration threshold that subsequently is not met, a registrant also has the option of termination. The obligation to report quarterly under the LDA arises from active status as a registrant; a report disclosing the final lobbying activity of a registrant is mandatory. In order to terminate the registration, the registrant must file the quarterly activity report (LD-2) by the next quarterly filing date, checking the “Termination Report” box, and supplying the date that the lobbying activity terminated. A valid termination report discloses lobbying income or expenses and any lobbying activity by lobbyists during the period up to and including the termination date.

Example 1: Lobbying Firm “A” accepted a contract with Client “B” on January 1, 2015, began lobbying activities, and timely registered on or before February 14. On March 31, the contract with “B” ended. Lobbying Firm “A” must file a quarterly activity report (LD-2) by April 20, 2015, disclosing the lobbying income from and lobbying activity for Client “B” that took place during the period January 1 through March 31. In the filing system, the firm will select the First Quarter and check the box for a “Termination Report” and enter the termination date as “3/31/2015.”

Example 2: Corporation “C” filed its registration on February 14, 2015, listing employee “E” as its only lobbyist. Through March 31, “E” spends less than 20 percent of her total time in lobbying activities. “C” would not have filed a registration if it had foreseen that its lobbying activities would be so limited, and there is no expectation that “E” or any other employee of “C” will meet the 2 U.S.C. § 1602(10) definition of “lobbyist” for the April–June quarterly period nor that lobbying expenses will exceed $14,000. While Corporation “C” as a registrant must file a report for January–March 2015, “C” will check the “Termination Report” box and enter 3/31/15 as the termination date. “C” will also disclose the amount of expenses for the reporting period, and “E’s” lobbying activity for the reporting period.

Section 9 – Relationship of the LDA to Other Statutes

Lobbying disclosure and fara.

The LDA reflects a determination that the Foreign Agents Registration Act (FARA) standards are appropriate for lobbying on behalf of foreign governments and political parties, but that LDA disclosure standards should apply to other foreign lobbying. An agent of a foreign commercial entity is exempt under FARA if the agent has engaged in lobbying activities and registers under the LDA ( 2 U.S.C. § 1603 ). An agent of a foreign commercial entity not required to register under the LDA (such as those not meeting the de minimis registration thresholds) may voluntarily register under the LDA. The statute affirms the bright line distinction between governmental and non-governmental representations, and is not meant to shroud foreign government enterprises. Questions relating to the Foreign Agents Registration Act must be directed to the Department of Justice Foreign Agent Registration Unit at (202) 233-0776 or (202) 233-0777, or by email at [email protected] .

LDA and IRC

Restrictions on lobbying by tax-exempt organizations are governed by the definitions in the Internal Revenue Code (IRC), not those of the LDA. The LDA and the IRC intersect in three different ways.

First, the LDA ( 2 U.S.C. § 1610 ) defines which registrants are eligible for the “safe harbor.” This allows entities that are required to report and do report lobbying expenditures under 26 U.S.C. § 6033(b)(8) of the IRC to use IRC definitions for purposes of LDA sections 2 U.S.C. § 1603(a)(3) and 2 U.S.C. § 1604(b)(4) . The LDA ( 2 U.S.C. § 1610 ) also allows entities that are subject to 26 U.S.C. § 162(e) of the IRC to use IRC definitions for purposes of LDA sections 2 U.S.C. § 1603(a)(3) and 2 U.S.C. § 1604(b)(4) .

Second, the LDA advises registrants regarding how they should use IRC definitions. Registrants who make the LDA expense election must use for other reporting the IRC definitions (including the IRC definition of a covered Executive Branch official) for Executive Branch lobbying, and the LDA definitions for Legislative Branch lobbying.

Third, the LDA allows electing registrants to insert the amount that is ultimately reportable to the Internal Revenue Service for LDA quarterly activity reports (LD-2).

LDA and False Statements Accountability Act of 1996

The False Statements Accountability Act of 1996, amending 18 U.S.C. § 1001 , makes it a crime knowingly and willfully: (1) to falsify, conceal, or cover up a material fact by trick, scheme, or device; (2) to make any materially false, fictitious, or fraudulent statement or representation; or (3) to make or use any false writing or document knowing it to contain any materially false, fictitious, or fraudulent statement or entry; with respect to matters within the jurisdiction of the Legislative, Executive, or Judicial branch. The False Statements Accountability Act does not assign any responsibilities to the Secretary and the Clerk.

LDA and Prohibitions on the Use of Federal Funds for Lobbying

The LDA does not itself regulate lobbying by federal grantees, or contractors, though other laws, as well as contractual prohibitions, may apply. Questions concerning lobbying activities of federal grantees or contractors should be directed to the appropriate agency or office administrating the contract or grant.

Note, however, that 2 U.S.C. § 1611 prohibits 501(c)(4) organizations which engage in lobbying activities from receiving federal funds through an award, grant, or loan.

Section 10 – Public Availability

The LDA requires the Secretary of the Senate and the Clerk of the House of Representatives to make all registrations and reports available for public inspection over the Internet as soon as technically practicable after the report is filed.

Filers are encouraged to use the online databases of lobbying reports to verify compliance. Each database is searchable, sortable, and downloadable. Registrations and reports are available online at the House website at http://lobbyingdisclosure.house.gov , as well as the Senate website at http://www.senate.gov/lobby .

Section 11 – Review and Compliance

The Secretary of the Senate (Office of Public Records) and the Clerk of the House (Legislative Resource Center) must review, verify, and request corrections in writing to ensure the accuracy, completeness, and timeliness of registrations and reports filed under the LDA.

Section 12 – Penalties

Whoever knowingly fails: (1) to correct a defective filing within 60 days after notice of such a defect by the Secretary of the Senate or the Clerk of the House; or (2) to comply with any other provision of the Act, may be subject to a civil fine of not more than $200,000, and whoever knowingly and corruptly fails to comply with any provision of this Act may be imprisoned for not more than 5 years or fined under Title 18, United States Code, or both.

For Further Information

Senate Office of Public Records 232 Hart Senate Office Building Washington, DC 20510 (202) 224-0758 http://www.senate.gov/lobby

Legislative Resource Center B-81 Cannon House Office Building Washington, DC 20515 (202) 226-5200 http://lobbyingdisclosure.house.gov

1 The Secretary and the Clerk review the Guidance periodically. Any questions, comments, and suggestions should be directed to the Senate Office of Public Records and the House Legislative Resource Center.

Download PDF

  • Lobbying Disclosure Act Guidance (PDF, 255 KB)

Related Articles

  • The Lobbying Disclosure Act of 1995
  • Lobbying Disclosure Technical Amendments Act of 1998

Office of the Clerk United States House of Representatives U.S. Capitol, Room H-154 Washington D.C., 20515-6601 202-225-7000

An official website of the United States government

Here's how you know

Official websites use .gov A .gov website belongs to an official government organization in the United States.

Secure .gov websites use HTTPS A lock ( ) or https:// means you've safely connected to the .gov website. Share sensitive information only on official, secure websites.

CMS Newsroom

Search cms.gov.

  • Physician Fee Schedule
  • Local Coverage Determination
  • Medically Unlikely Edits

Report to Congress

Report to congress – identification of quality measurement priorities: strategic plan, initiatives, and activities.

The Secretary of HHS is required to submit this Report to Congress – Identification of Quality Measurement Priorities: Strategic Plan, Initiatives, and Activities under section 1890(e) of the Social Security Act (the Act), as added by section 50206(b) of the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2018. The report, which contains six required elements, addresses quality measurement priorities for the Medicare program.    

The first element is a comprehensive plan to meet the quality measurement needs of CMS programs and initiatives. The report describes a coordinated strategy for using the consensus-based entity (CBE) under contract with HHS and other contractors that conduct CBE activities described in sections 1890 and 1890A of the Act. These activities include measure dissemination, program assessment and review, and program oversight and design. The report also presents the strategy and operational framework that has guided quality measure endorsement, measure selection, and public input since 2009.

The report details: funding that has been provided, obligated, or expended, along with associated activities under section 1890 and section 1890A of the Act; how the funds were used by the Secretary and others for specific task orders and work assigned to the consensus-based entity and contractors for activities under these sections; and remaining funds yet to be obligated.

Finally, the report contains the Secretary’s projections of future expenditures and obligations for each of the quality measurement activities required under these sections in the two-year period after its publication. The planned quality measurement activities align with the comprehensive plan developed by CMS, which incorporates the six crosscutting principles that underpin the Meaningful Measures Initiative: eliminate disparities, track to measurable outcomes and impact, safeguard public health, achieve cost savings, improve access for rural communities, and reduce burden. With this crosscutting work, CMS strives to reduce the burden of measure reporting while rewarding value over volume, as well as increase clinicians’, providers’, and facilities’ ability to deliver equitable, high-quality care that is most appropriate for patients.

In addition, the Secretary is required to annually submit a Report to Congress (RTC) on the amount of the unobligated balances for appropriations related to quality measurement work according to the Consolidated Appropriations Act (CAA) of 2021.  This report identifies all authorized funding for quality measurement activities performed under sections 1890 and 1890A of the Act, the funds obligated and expended under such sections and unobligated balances are as of September 30 of each year.

The reports are available by clicking on the title under ‘Downloads ’ below:

  • 2023 Report on Unobligated Balances for Appropriations Relating to Quality Measurement (PDF)
  • 2022 Report on Unobligated Balances for Appropriations Relating to Quality Measurement (PDF)
  • 2021 Report on Unobligated Balances for Appropriations Relating to Quality Measurement (PDF)
  • 2023 Report to Congress – Identification of Quality Measurement Priorities: Strategic Plan, Initiatives, and Activities (PDF)
  • 2022 Report to Congress – Identification of Quality Measurement Priorities: Strategic Plan, Initiatives, and Activities (PDF)
  • 2022 Report to Congress (RTC) on the Administration, Cost, and Impact of the Quality  Improvement Organization Program for Medicare Beneficiaries (PDF)
  • 2021 Report to Congress – Identification of Quality Measurement Priorities: Strategic Plan, Initiatives, and Activities (PDF)
  • 2020 Report to Congress (RTC) on the Administration, Cost, and Impact of the Quality (PDF) Improvement Organization (QIO) Program for Medicare Beneficiaries (PDF)
  • 2020 Report to Congress – Identification of Quality Measurement Priorities: Strategic Plan, Initiatives, and Activities (PDF)
  • 2019 Report to Congress – Identification of Quality Measurement Priorities: Strategic Plan, Initiatives, and Activities   (PDF)

Related Links

Meaningful Measures Initiative

Your web browser is not supported

You're using Internet Explorer, some features might not work. Please switch to another browser like Chrome, Firefox, or Edge for a better experience.

US flag signifying that this is a United States Federal Government website

An official website of the United States government

Here's how you know

Official websites use .gov A .gov website belongs to an official government organization in the United States.

Secure .gov websites use HTTPS A lock ( Lock A locked padlock ) or https:// means you've safely connected to the .gov website. Share sensitive information only on official, secure websites.

  • Search Search

Registration and reporting

Federal candidates and political committees must register with the FEC when they reach certain thresholds. Once registered, they file regular reports about their financial activity.

This website’s help for candidates and committees section  explains the reporting requirements that apply to each committee type. 

The role of committee treasurers

Under federal campaign finance law, a political committee must have a treasurer before it conducts financial transactions. Under the law, a political committee may not accept contributions or make expenditures without a treasurer.

This information is not intended to replace the law or to change its meaning, nor does this information create or confer any rights for or on any person or bind the Federal Election Commission or the public.

The reader is encouraged also to consult the Federal Election Campaign Act of 1971, as amended (52 U.S.C. 30101 et seq.), Commission regulations (Title 11 of the Code of Federal Regulations), Commission advisory opinions and applicable court decisions.

Home

U.S. Government Accountability Office

Congressional Review Act

The Congressional Review Act requires GAO to report on major rules that federal agencies make, including summaries of the procedural steps taken by the agencies.

Federal agencies promulgating rules must submit a copy to both houses of Congress and GAO before the rules can take effect. (Congressional Review Act, 5 U.S.C.§ 801(a)(1)(A) ). We track all rules (major and non-major) submitted to us.

Federal agencies can submit rules to GAO using the  Submission of Federal Rules under the Congressional Review Act (PDF, 2 pages).

We also provide Congress with related Legal Opinions, upon request.

GAO Contact Please send comments and suggestions to  [email protected] .

Search Reports on Major Rules

Your search results will include any reports on major rules GAO has issued.

Search Database of Rules

We track all rules (major and non-major) submitted to us. Your search results will include all rules submitted to us..

The CRA allows Congress to review "major" rules issued by federal agencies before the rules take effect. Congress may also disapprove new rules, resulting in the rules having no force or effect. 5 U.S.C. § 802(a).

The CRA requires an agency promulgating a rule to submit the rule to Congress and GAO before it can take effect. The agency's submission should include (1) a copy of the rule; (2) a concise general statement relating to the rule, including whether it is a major rule; and (3) the proposed effective date of the rule. 5 U.S.C. § 801(a)(1)(A). Agency submissions also generally include cost-benefit, Paperwork Reduction Act, and Administrative Procedure Act analyses.

The CRA defines a major rule as one that has resulted in or is likely to result in (1) an annual effect on the economy of $100 million or more; (2) a major increase in costs or prices for consumers, individual industries, federal, state, or local government agencies, or geographic regions; or (3) significant adverse effects on competition, employment, investment, productivity, or innovation, or on the ability of United States-based enterprises to compete with foreign-based enterprises in domestic and export markets. 5 U.S.C. § 804(2).

The CRA requires GAO to report to Congress on whether an agency, in promulgating a major rule, has complied with the regulatory process. GAO does not analyze or comment on the substance or quality of rulemaking. GAO's report must be made to each house of Congress no later than 15 calendar days after a rule's submission or publication date. 5 U.S.C. § 801(a)(2)(A).

Although agencies must submit non-major rules to both Congress and GAO, GAO is not required to submit a report to Congress on an agency's compliance with procedural requirements governing the rulemaking process. Use our Search Federal Rules function for information on all federal rules, major and non-major, that agencies have submitted to GAO.

No. Agencies should only submit major, non-major, and interim final rules to GAO.

Agencies should send their submissions to  [email protected] . GAO will not accept submissions by regular mail or fax.

Submissions should include a completed  Submission of Federal Rules form  (PDF, 2 pages).

If you have any questions regarding this notice, please email  [email protected] .

Confirmation is sent to agencies for rules received by fax or e-mail.

Please contact [email protected] with questions about your submission.

Under the CRA, Congress can pass a joint resolution of disapproval relating to a rule. 5 U.S.C. §§ 801(a)(3)(B), 802. The following is a list of resolutions of disapproval that have been enacted since 1996 (when the CRA itself was enacted):

  • On May 21, 2018, a Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection Rule relating "Indirect Auto Lending and Compliance with the Equal Credit Opportunity Act" (CFPB Bulletin 2013-02, March 21, 2013) was overturned (see Pub. L. No. 115-172 (May 21, 2018)).
  • On November 1, 2017, a Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection Rule relating to ''Arbitration Agreements'' (82 Fed. Reg. 33,210 (July 19, 2017)) was overturned (see Pub. L. No. 115-74 (Nov. 1, 2017)).
  • On May 17, 2017, a Department of Labor Rule on Savings Arrangements Established by States for Non-Governmental Employees (81 Fed. Reg. 59464 (August 30, 2016)) was overturned (see Pub. L. No. 115-35 (May 17, 2017)).
  • On April 13, 2017, a Department of Labor Rule on Savings Arrangements Established by Qualified State Political Subdivisions for Non-Governmental Employees (81 Fed. Reg. 92,639 (December 20, 2016)) was overturned (see Pub. L. No. 115-24 (April 13, 2017)).
  • On April 13, 2017, a Health and Human Services Rule on Compliance With Title X Requirements by Project Recipients in Selecting Subrecipients (81 Fed. Reg. 91,852 (December 19, 2016)) was overturned (see Pub. L. No. 115-23 (April 13, 2017)).
  • On April 3, 2017, a Federal Communications Commission rule on Protecting the Privacy of Customers of Broadband and Other Telecommunications Services (81 Fed. Reg. 87,274 (December 2, 2016)) was overturned (see Pub. L. No. 115-22 (April 3, 2017)).
  • On April 3, 2017, a Department of Labor rule on Clarification of Employer’s Continuing Obligation to Make and Maintain an Accurate Record of Each Recordable Injury and Illness (81 Fed. Reg. 91,792 (December 19, 2016)) was overturned (see Pub. L. No. 115-21 (April 3, 2017)).
  • On April 3, 2017, a Department of Interior rule on Non-Subsistence Take of Wildlife, and Public Participation and Closure Procedures, on National Wildlife Refuges in Alaska (81 Fed. Reg. 52,247 (August 5, 2016)) was overturned (see Pub. L. No. 115-20 (April 3, 2017)).
  • On March 31, 2017, a Department of Labor rule on drug testing of unemployment compensation applicants (81 Fed. Reg. 50,298 (Aug. 1, 2016)) was overturned (see Pub. L. No. 115-17 (March 31, 2017)).
  • On March 27, 2017, a Department of Education rule on Teacher Preparation Issues (81 Fed. Reg. 75,494 (Oct. 31, 2016)) was overturned (see Pub. L. No. 115-14 (March 27, 2017)).
  • On March 27, 2017, a Department of Education rule on Accountability and State Plans under the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965, as Amended by the Every Student Succeeds Act— (81 Fed. Reg. 86,076 (Nov. 29, 2016)) was overturned (see Pub. L. No. 115-13 (March 27, 2017)).
  • On March 27, 2017, a Department of Interior rule on Resource Management Planning (81 Fed. Reg. 89,580 (Dec. 12, 2016)) was overturned (see Pub. L. No. 115-12 (March 27, 2017)).
  • On March 27, 2017, a Department of Defense, General Services Administration, and National Aeronautics and Space Administration rule amending the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR); Fair Pay and Safe Workplaces (81 Fed. Reg. 58,562 (Aug. 25, 2016)) was overturned (see Pub. L. No. 115-11 (March 27, 2017)).
  • On February 28, 2017, a Social Security Administration rule on Implementation of the National Instant Criminal Background Check System (NICS) Improvement Amendments Act of 2007. (81 Fed. Reg. 91,702 (Dec. 19, 2016)) was overturned (see Pub. L. No. 115-8 (Feb. 28, 2017)).
  • On February 16, 2017, a Department of Interior rule on stream protection (81 Fed. Reg. 93,066 (Dec. 20, 2016)) was overturned (see Pub. L. No. 115-5 (Feb. 16, 2017)).
  • On February 14, 2017, a Securities and Exchange Commission rule on the disclosure of payments by resource extraction issuers (81 Fed. Reg. 49,359 (Mar. 27, 2016)) was overturned (see Pub. L. No. 115-4 (Feb. 14, 2017)).
  • On March 20, 2001, a Department of Labor rule on the ergonomics program (65 Fed. Reg. 68,262 (Nov. 14, 2000)) was overturned (see Pub. L. No. 107-5 (Mar. 20, 2001)).

OMB reviews rules to ensure that regulations are consistent with applicable law, the President's priorities, and the principles set forth in Executive Order No. 12, 866, and that decisions made by one agency do not conflict with the policies or actions taken or planned by another agency. OMB's Administrator of Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs determines whether a rule is classified as major.

Legal Opinions

U.S. Department of Education—Applicability of the Congressional Review Act to Agency Statement titled "Fact Sheet: President Biden Announces New Actions to Provide Debt Relief and Support for Student Loan Borrowers"

Environmental Protection Agency—Applicability of the Congressional Review Act to Notice of Decision on Clean Air Act Waiver of Preemption

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention—Applicability of the Congressional Review Act to Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices Recommended Immunization Schedule for Children and Adolescents Aged 18 Years or Younger—United States, 2023

Securities and Exchange Commission—Applicability of the Congressional Review Act to Staff Accounting Bulletin No. 121

U.S. Department of Transportation—Applicability of the Congressional Review Act to Notice of Funding Opportunity for the Department of Transportation's FY 2023-2024 Multimodal Project Discretionary Grant Opportunity

U.S. Department of Defense—Applicability of the Congressional Review Act to Certain Healthcare Memoranda

U.S. Food and Drug Administration—Applicability of the Congressional Review Act to Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy (REMS) Single Shared System for Mifepristone 200 mg

Department of Homeland Security—Applicability of the Congressional Review Act to the Memoranda Terminating the Migrant Protection Protocols

U.S. Department of Agriculture, Food and Nutrition Service—Applicability of the Congressional Review Act to Food and Nutrition Service Policy Memorandum CRD 01-2022, Application of Bostock v. Clayton County to Program Discrimination Complaint Processing—Policy Update

U.S. Department of Agriculture—Applicability of the Congressional Review Act to Documents Implementing Four Financial Assistance Programs

Office of Personnel Management—Applicability of the Congressional Review Act to Guidance on Enforcing Coronavirus Disease 2019 Vaccination Requirement for Federal Employees-Executive Order 14043

Federal Highway Administration—Request for Reconsideration—Policy on Using Bipartisan Infrastructure Law Resources to Build a Better America

U.S. Department of Education—Applicability of the Congressional Review Act to the Department of Education's Student Loan Debt Relief Website and Accompanying Federal Register Publication

Office of Personnel Management—Applicability of the Congressional Review Act to the Memorandum on Achieving a $15 Per Hour Minimum Pay Rate for Federal Employees

Environmental Protection Agency—Applicability of the Congressional Review Act to June 2022 Denial of Petitions for Small Refinery Exemptions Under the Renewable Fuel Standard Program

Court Services and Offender Supervision Agency, Pretrial Services Agency—Privacy Act of 1974; Systems of Records Notice

Federal Highway Administration—Policy on Using Bipartisan Infrastructure Law Resources to Build a Better America

United States Department of Agriculture—Applicability of the Congressional Review Act to the 2021 Updates to the Thrifty Food Plan

Safer Federal Workforce Task Force—Applicability of the Congressional Review Act to COVID-19 Workplace Safety: Guidance for Federal Contractors and Subcontractors

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention—Applicability of Congressional Review Act to Requirement for Persons to Wear Masks While on Conveyances and at Transportation Hubs

Department of Housing and Urban Development—Applicability of the Congressional Review Act to Fair Housing Act Guidance on Assistance Animals

Federal Communications Commission—Applicability of the Congressional Review Act to Ligado Amendment to License Modification Applications

Request for a Congressional Review Act Opinion on IRS Notice 2020-65

Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System—Applicability of the Congressional Review Act to Supervision and Regulation Letter 15-18

Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System--Applicability of the Congressional Review Act to Supervision and Regulation Letter 11-7

Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System—Applicability of the Congressional Review Act to Supervision and Regulation Letters

Department of Health and Human Services and Department of the Treasury— Applicability of the Congressional Review Act to State Relief and Empowerment Waivers

Department of Commerce - Memorandum Regarding a Citizenship Question on the 2020 Decennial Census Questionnaire

U.S. Department of Justice – Applicability of the Congressional Review Act to the Attorney General's April 2018 Memorandum

Social Security Administration: Applicability of the Congressional Review Act to Sections of the Hearings, Appeals, and Litigation Law Manual

Internal Revenue Service: Applicability of the Congressional Review Act to Revenue Procedure 2018-38

Internal Revenue Service: Applicability of the Congressional Review Act to the IRS Statement on Health Care Reporting Requirements

Department of State, U.S. Agency for International Development: Applicability of the Congressional Review Act to the Protecting Life in Global Health Assistance Fact Sheet and Revised Standard Provisions for U.S. Nongovernmental Organizations

Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection: Applicability of the Congressional Review Act to Bulletin on Indirect Auto Lending and Compliance with the Equal Credit Opportunity Act

Eastern Interior Resource Management Plan

Tongass National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan Amendment

Office of the Comptroller of the Currency, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation--Applicability of the Congressional Review Act to Interagency Guidance on Leveraged Lending

GAO's Role and Responsibilities Under the Congressional Review Act

Temporary Assistance For Needy Families: Information Memorandum Constitutes Rule for the Purposes of the Congressional Review Act

Applicability of the Congressional Review Act to Letter on State Children's Health Insurance Program

Whether a Department of Veterans Affairs Memorandum is a Rule Under the Congressional Review Act, B-292045, May 19, 2003

Whether Department of Veterans Affairs Memorandum is a Rule Under the Congressional Review Act

Comments on Major Rule for the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services

Opinion on Whether Trinity River Record of Decision is a Rule

Opinion on Whether the Farm Credit Administration's National Charter Initiative Is a Rule Under the Congressional Review Act

[Comments on Whether EPA Interim Guidance Is a Rule Under the Congressional Review Act]

Opinion as to Whether the American Heritage River Initiative is a "Rule" Under the Small Business Regulatory Enforcement Fairness Act

Status of the Tongass National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan Under the Small Business Regulatory Enforcement Fairness Act

INS and DOJ Executive Office for Immigration Review: Inspection and Expedited Removal of Aliens, Detention and Removal of Aliens, Conduct of Removal Proceedings, and Asylum Procedures

Whether Secretary of Agriculture Memorandum Concerning Emergency Salvage Timber Sale Program is a 'Rule' under 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A)

Official websites use .gov

Secure .gov websites use HTTPS

organization must report to congress

Documents for Congress

U.s. department of state, the lessons of 1989: freedom and our future.

  • Today’s Paper
  • Play Crossword
  • Express Shorts
  • Premium Stories
  • Health & Wellness
  • Take Our Reader Survey

As Congress backs farmers’ MSP demand, what has the govt committee set up in 2022 done so far?

The 26-member panel headed by sanjay agrawal was set up after the prime minister announced the withdrawal of the laws that had triggered the farmers' protest of 2020-21. when is the committee supposed to submit its report.

organization must report to congress

A major demand of the farmers who broke through police barricades and braved tear gas on their way to Delhi on Tuesday (February 13) is for the enactment of a law to guarantee minimum support prices (MSP) for all crops, as per the formula recommended by the Dr M S Swaminathan Commission.

In the evening, Congress leaders Rahul Gandhi and Mallikarjun Kharge announced the party had made a “historic” decision to provide this legal guarantee to farmers.

organization must report to congress

किसान भाइयों आज ऐतिहासिक दिन है! कांग्रेस ने हर किसान को फसल पर स्वामीनाथन कमीशन के अनुसार MSP की कानूनी गारंटी देने का फैसला लिया है। यह कदम 15 करोड़ किसान परिवारों की समृद्धि सुनिश्चित कर उनका जीवन बदल देगा। न्याय के पथ पर यह कांग्रेस की पहली गारंटी है। #KisaanNYAYGuarantee — Rahul Gandhi (@RahulGandhi) February 13, 2024
कांग्रेस ने ऐतिहासिक प्रण लिया है — हम स्वामीनाथन कमेटी की रिपोर्ट के मुताबिक़, किसानों को MSP क़ानून बनाकर उचित मूल्य की गारंटी देंगे। इससे 15 करोड़ किसान परिवारों को फ़ायदा पहुँचेगा। #KisaanNYAYGuarantee 📍अंबिकापुर, छत्तीसगढ़ pic.twitter.com/weR0pNKkGK — Mallikarjun Kharge (@kharge) February 13, 2024

This comes at a time when a committee appointed by the central government in July 2022 continues to deliberate on ways to make MSP more “effective and transparent”.

This panel was constituted seven months after farmers who had gathered at Delhi ’s border called off their year-long protest, after the Prime Minister announced the repeal of the farm laws. The committee’s terms of reference do not include a legal guarantee for MSP.

The committee

The committee, which was set up to “promote Zero budget based farming, to change crop pattern keeping in mind the changing needs of the country, and to make MSP more effective and transparent”, was notified by the Union Ministry of Agriculture and Farmers’ Welfare on July 18, 2022.

Festive offer

The committee, which has 26 members, is headed by Sanjay Agrawal, a former agriculture secretary.

Its other members are (i) NITI Aayog member (Agriculture) Ramesh Chand, (ii) two agricultural economists, (iii) an award-winning farmer, (iv) five representatives of farmers’ organisations other than the Samyukta Kisan Morcha (SKM), (v) two representatives of farmers’ cooperatives/ groups, (vi) one member of the Commission for Agricultural Costs and Prices (CACP), (vii) three persons from agricultural universities and institutions, (viii) five secretaries of the Government of India, (ix) four officers from four states, and (x) one joint secretary from the Agriculture Ministry.

Under the category of farmers’ representatives, the committee had three positions for members of the SKM, the umbrella body of farmers’ unions that had spearheaded the 2020-21 agitation, but they did not join the committee.

The SKM has not joined the ongoing protest so far. The farmers currently marching to Delhi belong to the Kisan Mazdoor Morcha (KMM) and Samyukta Kisan Morcha (non-political), a breakaway faction of the SKM.

  • SC strikes down electoral bonds scheme as 'unconstitutional': The issues raised
  • ExplainSpeaking: Consumer sentiments improving but still stuck in pessimism
  • Nvidia releases 'Chat with RTX' AI chatbot: What the move signals

Purpose of panel

On November 19, 2021, Prime Minister Narendra Modi announced that the government had decided to withdraw the (now repealed) three farm laws — the Farmers Produce Trade and Commerce (Promotion and Facilitation) Act, 2020, the Farmers (Empowerment and Protection) Agreement on Price Assurance and Farm Services Act, 2020; and the Essential Commodities (Amendment) Act, 2020.

“A committee will be constituted to decide on matters like promotion of zero budget farming, i.e. natural farming, scientifically change the crop pattern keeping in mind the changing requirements of the country, and make MSP more effective and transparent.

“The committee will include representatives of the central government, state governments, farmers, agricultural scientists and agricultural economists,” Modi had said. The notification of the Agriculture Ministry was along the same lines.

Mandate of panel

The ministry’s July 18, 2022 notification said the committee’s “subject matter” has three points: MSP, natural farming, and crop diversification.

On the MSP, the committee has been asked for suggestions to “make available MSP to farmers of the country by making the system more effective and transparent”. The panel is also supposed to make recommendations to strengthen the Agricultural Marketing System “as per the changing requirements of the country to ensure higher value to the farmers through remunerative prices of their produce by taking advantage of the domestic and export opportunities”.

The committee was also asked for suggestions on the “practicality to give more autonomy to Commission for Agricultural Costs and Prices (CACP) and measures to make it more scientific”.

Progress in panel

The committee on MSP had its first meeting on August 22, 2022.

The Agriculture Ministry has said the committee has been meeting on a “regular basis actively to deliberate” on the “subject matters assigned to it”. Six main meetings and thirty-one sub-group meetings/ workshops have been held by the committee so far, according to the ministry.

The July 18, 2022 notification did not specify the tenure of the Sanjay Agrawal committee. Therefore, the committee has no deadline by which it is required to present its report.

People talk about counting sheep to fall asleep. I haven’t been able to figure out the meaning of that. How does one count sheep?

Manjiri Indurkar on grieving and living again Premium Story

Behind Mrs Kapur’s desk, Swahili regarded us from his big brass cage

Ranjit Lal on parrots' unique love language Premium Story

FIRE movement India, Early retirement India, Millennials and Gen Z retirement, Financial independence India, Work-life balance India, FIRE movement India tips, How to achieve FIRE in India, Is FIRE movement right for me in India?, FIRE movement India risks and benefits, FIRE movement India for women, Early retirement planning India

What is fanning the flames of the FIRE movement in Premium Story

Love Storiyaan review

Love Storiyaan review Premium Story

jaipur literature festival

“Telugu literature is in the pits”: Gita Ramaswamy Premium Story

Ashutosh Gowariker movies

Ashutosh Gowariker: Where's the director who took us to Oscars? Premium Story

Sustainable clothing for children

How startup Petit Pli is making children's clothing sustainable Premium Story

This means that nearly 9 in 10 professionals in India are considering a new job in 2024, marking a 4% increase in year-over-year growth as compared to 2023, marking a significant shift in attitudes and signalling a major shakeup in the job market.

88% Indian professionals chasing new jobs, says LinkedIn Premium Story

Love is a language with many dialects. Gen Z is simply speaking theirs, valentine's day, v day, vday gen z

For Gen Z, Valentine's Day is not just about love Premium Story

Harikishan Sharma

Harikishan Sharma, Senior Assistant Editor at The Indian Express' National Bureau, specializes in reporting on governance, policy, and data. He covers the Prime Minister’s Office and pivotal central ministries, such as the Ministry of Agriculture & Farmers’ Welfare, Ministry of Cooperation, Ministry of Consumer Affairs, Food and Public Distribution, Ministry of Rural Development, and Ministry of Jal Shakti. His work primarily revolves around reporting and policy analysis. In addition to this, he authors a weekly column titled "STATE-ISTICALLY SPEAKING," which is prominently featured on The Indian Express website. In this column, he immerses readers in narratives deeply rooted in socio-economic, political, and electoral data, providing insightful perspectives on these critical aspects of governance and society. ... Read More

  • Express Explained
  • Express Premium
  • minimum support price

Kamal Nath, Madhya Pradesh, Madhya Pradesh former CM, former CM Kamal Nath, Madhya Pradesh Congress, Congress state unit

Kamal Nath's potential move to the BJP is seen as a strategic move by the party to showcase the Congress' decline and strengthen their own dominance. With his departure, the Congress would also lose his fundraising abilities and regional influence in Madhya Pradesh, further solidifying the BJP's hold. His age and lack of ideological baggage make him a valuable asset for the BJP.

Indianexpress

More Explained

Explained Economics

Best of Express

Kamal Nath, Madhya Pradesh, Madhya Pradesh former CM, former CM Kamal Nath, Madhya Pradesh Congress, Congress state unit

EXPRESS OPINION

budget white paper

Feb 18: Latest News

  • 01 Uddhav humiliated Sainiks who were instrumental in Sena’s rise: Eknath Shinde
  • 02 Boat seized near Mumbai: 3 men granted bail
  • 03 Over 9,000 students from 8 NE Delhi schools likely to be shifted to new building next year
  • 04 ‘Politics in schools’: Parents, teachers slam move asking school kids to pose with CM letter, upload selfies
  • 05 FIH Hockey Pro League: Indian women find joy after tough few weeks, upset World No 3 Australia in an Olympics repeat
  • Elections 2024
  • Political Pulse
  • Entertainment
  • Movie Review
  • Newsletters
  • Web Stories

Opinion Forget about a second term. Is Biden fit to be president right now?

organization must report to congress

Special counsel Robert K. Hur, in a devastating 345-page report on his investigation into President Biden’s mishandling of classified documents, concludes that Biden “willfully retained and disclosed classified materials.” But that is not his report’s real bombshell. Far more damaging is the picture it paints, in explaining Hur’s decision not to prosecute, of Biden as suffering from “diminished faculties” and “ significant limitations ” on his memory. So much so, the report says, that jurors would be unlikely to convict Biden because they would find him “a sympathetic, well-meaning, elderly man with a poor memory.”

Most of us can judge Biden’s mental fitness only by his many struggles in public appearances — most recently forgetting the name “Hamas” while trying for about 30 painful seconds to articulate the state of hostage negotiations, referring to his recent meeting with a French president who died in 1996 , and claiming to have discussed the Capitol riot with German Chancellor Helmut Kohl , who died nearly four years before it took place.

We are left to wonder: If the president is this diminished in public, what is he like behind closed doors?

Well, the special counsel office’s report draws back the curtain and shows us. Based on its review of dozens of hours of recorded conversations between Biden, his ghostwriter, Mark Zwonitzer , and “on our direct interactions with and observations of him” during interviews with Justice Department lawyers, a deeply troubling picture emerges a man who at times seems incapable to conducting basic conversations.

“Mr. Biden’s memory … appeared to have significant limitations,” Hur writes, “both at the time he spoke to Zwonitzer in 2017, as evidenced by their recorded conversations, and today, as evidenced by his recorded interview with our office.” The recorded conversations with the ghostwriter “are often painfully slow, with Mr. Biden struggling to remember events and straining at times to read and relay his own notebook entries.”

organization must report to congress

“In his interview with our office, Mr. Biden’s memory was worse,” Hur continues. Biden “did not remember when he was vice president, forgetting on the first day of the interview when his term ended (‘if it was 2013 — when did I stop being Vice President?’), and forgetting on the second day of the interview when his term began (‘in 2009, am I still Vice President?’). He did not remember, even within several years, when his son Beau died.”

The report adds that Biden’s “memory appeared hazy when describing the Afghanistan debate that was once so important to him,” adding that “among other things, he mistakenly said he ‘had a real difference’ of opinion with General Karl Eikenberry, when, in fact, Eikenberry was an ally whom Mr. Biden cited approvingly in his Thanksgiving memo to President Obama.”

Hur concludes that jurors would likely find “Mr. Biden’s apparent lapses and failures” in sharing classified information with his ghostwriter in 2017 “consistent with the diminished faculties and faulty memory he showed in Zwonitzer’s interview recordings and in our interview of him.”

As a columnist without a medical degree, I am in no position to diagnose Biden, and neither are most Americans. But we see what we see — how his gait has stiffened and his ability to answer simple questions has declined. Which is why multiple polls show that 76 percent of American voters believe Biden is too old to effectively serve another term as president and 54 percent say he no longer has “the competence to carry out the job of president.”

That was based on his public appearances. But the special counsel’s description of his private interactions raises these concerns to Defcon 1. If the president is this confused in his meetings with Justice Department lawyers, how bad are his interactions with world leaders or his meetings with his own national security officials in the Situation Room? During the disastrous U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan in August 2021, Biden falsely claimed that none of his military advisers had recommended leaving a residual force of 2,500 troops, only to have those military leaders testify that they had in fact given him that advice. Did he lie, or did he simply not recall what they had told him? Which is worse?

A few weeks ago, much of Washington was outraged by a defense secretary who failed to disclose a serious medical condition and undermined the military chain of command. Well, now we have reason to be concerned about the man at the top of that chain of command.

Biden’s news conference Thursday, in which he angrily defended his mental acuity (“I’m well-meaning, and I’m an elderly man, and I know what the hell I’m doing”) only made things worse. He referred to President Abdel Fatah El-Sisi of Egypt as the “ president of Mexico ” and claimed the special counsel never said that he shared classified information when Hur’s report said he “disclosed classified materials.”

In trying to rebut the report’s assertions, Biden pointed out that his five hours of interviews with the Justice Department across two days came as he was “managing an international crisis.” The first of the interviews came one day after Hamas’s Oct. 7 terrorist attack on Israel — and the special counsel’s report said Biden displayed “diminished faculties and faulty memory.” Can Americans afford to have a president with diminished faculties managing an international crisis?

The president’s closest aides protect him, and foreign leaders wouldn’t publicly reveal any concerns about their discussions with him, for fear of damaging relations with the United States. But the special counsel has shown us Biden behind the scenes. If the president is “struggling to remember events” during his “painfully slow” interactions with others, how can he effectively conduct diplomacy or make decisions on matters of peace and security?

There are wars raging in Europe and the Middle East; U.S. forces are under attack in Iraq, Syria and the Red Sea; the risk of war in the Pacific is growing; and rising numbers of people on the FBI’s terrorist watch list are trying to slip into the United States by illegally crossing the southern border. And apparently the commander in chief dealing with these overlapping crises is a “well-meaning, elderly man with a poor memory.”

We’re now beyond concern about whether Biden is fit to serve a second term; we should be concerned about whether he is fit to finish his first.

  • Opinion | Four signs Trump’s weaknesses are deepening February 15, 2024 Opinion | Four signs Trump’s weaknesses are deepening February 15, 2024
  • Opinion | A superpower of older age: Powerlessness February 14, 2024 Opinion | A superpower of older age: Powerlessness February 14, 2024
  • Opinion | I was head of the NSA. In a world of threats, this is my biggest worry. February 14, 2024 Opinion | I was head of the NSA. In a world of threats, this is my biggest worry. February 14, 2024

organization must report to congress

Everything that you need to know to start your own business. From business ideas to researching the competition.

Practical and real-world advice on how to run your business — from managing employees to keeping the books.

Our best expert advice on how to grow your business — from attracting new customers to keeping existing customers happy and having the capital to do it.

Entrepreneurs and industry leaders share their best advice on how to take your company to the next level.

  • Business Ideas
  • Human Resources
  • Business Financing
  • Growth Studio
  • Ask the Board

Looking for your local chamber?

Interested in partnering with us?

Start » strategy, how to file a beneficial ownership information report for your business.

Under the Corporate Transparency Act, U.S. small businesses must file beneficial ownership information reports with the Department of the Treasury.

 Woman working at a desk on a laptop in a modern-concept office with a red brick wall and greenery.

The Corporate Transparency Act (CTA) , aimed at combating illicit financial activity, went into effect on January 1, 2024. Under the act, small businesses across the United States need to file beneficial ownership information reports, also known as corporate transparency reports.

Here’s everything small business owners need to know about filing a corporate transparency report.

[Read More: What Every Small Business Needs to Know About the Corporate Transparency Act ]

What to know about beneficial ownership information reporting

The CTA was developed to increase transparency in business ownership and curtail the use of anonymous shell corporations for tax fraud, money laundering, and other illegal financial activity. Under this act, all businesses that fall under the definition of a reporting company must file a beneficial ownership information report (BOIR) with the Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN).

A reporting company is any privately held company, whether domestic or foreign, registered to conduct business in the U.S. Publicly traded companies do not fall under the CTA, as they are subject to their own reporting requirements.

A beneficial owner is any individual who owns or controls at least 25% of an organization, or directly or indirectly exercises substantial control in any of the following roles:

  • They serve as a senior officer, such as a president, CEO, or general counsel.
  • They have the authority to appoint or remove senior officers, board members, or other similar roles.
  • They make important decisions concerning the company’s business, finances, and/or structure.

[Read More: How to Prevent Bank Fraud and Protect Your Business Account ]

Reporting requirements for small businesses

Eligible small businesses will need to report the following information about their companies:

  • The full legal name of the company.
  • The company’s business address; P.O. boxes or lawyer’s/adviser’s offices cannot be accepted.
  • The state or Tribal jurisdiction where the company was formed or first registered.
  • The taxpayer identification number and an identity document, such as a filed Articles of Incorporation or Organization.

Corporate transparency reports must also include the below information about any beneficial owners:

  • Their full legal name and date of birth.
  • Their home address; P.O. boxes or lawyer’s/adviser’s offices cannot be accepted.
  • A photocopy of their U.S. driver’s license or passport.

Under this act, all businesses that fall under the definition of a reporting company must file a beneficial ownership information report (BOIR) with the Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN).

How to file your corporate transparency report

As of January 1, 2024, FinCEN has begun accepting beneficial ownership information reports. Here are four steps you can take to prepare your corporate transparency report.

1. Determine whether your business is required to file.

Under the CTA, LLCs and corporations must file beneficial ownership information reports unless they qualify for an exemption. The following entities are exempt from reporting:

  • Large operating companies; those with over 20 full-time employees in the U.S. and over $5 million in gross sales or receipts from U.S.-based sources.
  • Inactive entities that were established on or before January 1, 2020, but are not in active business.
  • Any other exemption from CTA reporting. If you aren't sure if your business falls under other CTA reporting exemptions, speak with a lawyer.

If your company is not an LLC or corporation, establish whether your business falls under the definition of a reporting company as defined above; a legal professional can also help you make this determination.

2. If your business qualifies, learn who the beneficial owners are.

List out any individuals who own or control 25% of your company, or otherwise exercise substantial control as defined above. If you are unsure if an individual meets the requirements of a beneficial owner, consult with a legal professional.

Once you have identified any beneficial owners, contact each to inform them that the CTA requires your business to report their personal information to FinCEN. Beneficial owners can choose to apply for a FinCEN Identifier and provide information to FinCEN directly. Otherwise, they can send the necessary information directly to you (the company) to be included in your business’s beneficial ownership information report.

3. Create a procedure.

Whether your beneficial owners are submitting their information via FinCEN or to your company, establish a process to keep all personal information organized, secure, and current. In addition to your initial report, you will need to file updated reports should there be a change in personal information or beneficial ownership.

[Read More: How to Choose the Best Business Entity for Your Small Business ]

4. File your report online.

All companies required to submit beneficial ownership information reports must file online via FinCEN . You can file one of two ways:

Complete and upload a PDF. Download a copy of the blank BOIR form as a PDF here and fill in the information. They can then upload the completed PDF using this page . It should be noted that Adobe Acrobat is required to open and complete this PDF.

Use FinCEN’s online platform. If you do not have Adobe Acrobat or simply wish to complete and file your BOIR within FinCEN’s platform, you can visit this page and follow the prompts. You will need to fill in information for and upload a photo of an identification document for each beneficial owner.

Reporting companies established before January 1, 2024, have until January 1, 2025, to file their initial corporate transparency reports. Companies established between January 1, 2024, and January 1, 2025, must file within 90 days from the notification or public announcement of their formation, whichever date comes first.

CO— aims to bring you inspiration from leading respected experts. However, before making any business decision, you should consult a professional who can advise you based on your individual situation.

CO—is committed to helping you start, run and grow your small business. Learn more about the benefits of small business membership in the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, here .

Next Event: Tax Filing Tips!

Join us on Thursday, February 22, at 12 pm ET for the first episode of our expert series, Ready. Set. Scale.: Smart Tax Tips for a Stress-Free Filing. We will have seasoned leaders offering actionable tips to help minimize the stressors of tax time for small businesses.

Subscribe to our newsletter, Midnight Oil

Expert business advice, news, and trends, delivered weekly

By signing up you agree to the CO— Privacy Policy. You can opt out anytime.

For more business strategies

22 resources for black-owned businesses, 5 quantifiable ways to determine it's time to grow or expand your business.

By continuing on our website, you agree to our use of cookies for statistical and personalisation purposes. Know More

Welcome to CO—

Designed for business owners, CO— is a site that connects like minds and delivers actionable insights for next-level growth.

U.S. Chamber of Commerce 1615 H Street, NW Washington, DC 20062

Social links

Looking for local chamber, stay in touch.

IMAGES

  1. Chapter 5: The Organization of Congress

    organization must report to congress

  2. Congress & the Legislative Process

    organization must report to congress

  3. 2020 Annual Report to Congress

    organization must report to congress

  4. Annual Reports to Congress

    organization must report to congress

  5. Annual Reports to Congress

    organization must report to congress

  6. CRS Report for Congress

    organization must report to congress

COMMENTS

  1. GPO and OMB Issue Guidance for Congressionally Mandated Reports

    WASHINGTON —Federal agencies are now required by law to submit congressionally mandated reports to the U.S. Government Publishing Office (GPO) by the end of the year. Today, GPO and the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) released a memo providing guidance to Federal agencies.

  2. Congressionally Mandated Reports

    Federal agencies must now electronically submit congressionally mandated reports after first submitting to Congress or any required committee or subcommittee of Congress through existing processes. The reports are published and made available to the public on GPO's online system of access, GovInfo.

  3. Personally Identifiable Information (PII) v4.0 Flashcards

    Organizations must report to Congress the status of their PII holdings every. Year. A PIA is required if your system for storing PII is entirely on paper. False. Identify if a PIA is required. B and D. Misuse of PII can result in legal liability of the organization. True.

  4. PDF MEMORANDUM January 6, 2022 To: Members of the ...

    Additionally, OMB must define a major incident, which agencies must report to Congress within seven days of identification. OMB's Office of the Federal Chief . 2 Information Officer (CIO) executes these responsibilities with the Federal Chief ... • Agency heads bear ultimate responsibility for their organization's risks and delegate the ...

  5. WNSF

    Organizations must report to Congress the status of their PII holdings every: Year. Exceptions that allow for the disclosure of PII include: All of the above. A PIA is required if your system for storing PII is entirely on paper. False Identify if a PIA is required: B and D Which are considered PII? All of the above

  6. How Are Reporting Requirements Submitted to Congress?

    How Are Reporting Requirements Submitted to Congress? Congress may direct federal agencies, commissions, and the President to prepare and submit required reports to Congress or its committees as a function of its oversight of the executive branch or to obtain information for the purpose of enacting legislation.

  7. PDF OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET

    Federal agencies regularly submit congressionally mandated reports to Congress, congressional committees, or subcommittees.1 The "Access to Congressionally Mandated Reports Act" (the Act),...

  8. Federal Incident Notification Guidelines

    Agencies must report information security incidents, where the confidentiality, ... they may not be included in the FISMA Annual Report to Congress. ... (e.g., all, subset, loss of efficiency) must be defined by the reporting organization. Contact your Security Office for guidance on responding to classified data spillage.

  9. Congressionally Mandated Reports: Overview and Considerations for Congress

    Congress frequently requires the President, departments, agencies, and other entities of the federal government to transmit reports, notifications, studies, and other information on a specified timeline. Reporting requirements may direct agency officials to notify Congress or its committees of forthcoming actions or decisions, describe actions ...

  10. Strategies for Identifying Reporting Requirements and Submitted

    Congress may direct federal and independent agencies, commissions, and the President to prepare and submit required reports to Congress and its committees as a function of its oversight of the executive branch and to obtain information for the purposes of enacting legislation.

  11. PDF OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET

    M-19-14. EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT. OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET. WASHINGTON, D.C. 20503. April 11, 2019. M-19-14. MEMORANDUM FOR THE HEADS OF EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS AND AGENCIES.

  12. Guide to the Lobbying Disclosure Act

    The electing organization also must report all expenses that fall within the applicable Internal Revenue Code definition. ... The Houses of Congress and Federal agencies contacted by lobbyists during the reporting period must be disclosed on the quarterly activity report (LD-2), picking from the list of government entities provided in the ...

  13. Report to Congress

    Report to Congress - Identification of Quality Measurement Priorities: Strategic Plan, Initiatives, and ActivitiesThe Secretary of HHS is required to submit this Report to Congress - Identification of Quality Measurement Priorities: Strategic Plan, Initiatives, and Activities under section 1890 (e) of the Social Security Act (the Act), as added ...

  14. Reports to Congress

    FY2024 OMB Report to the Committees on Appropriations on Continuing Rescissions or Cancellations in the Continuing Appropriations Act, 2024 (November 17, 2023) (4 Pages, 318 KB) FY2023 2023 Great...

  15. Organizations must report to Congress the status of their PII ...

    Organizations must report to Congress the status of their PII holdings every: A. Six Months B. Year C. Five years D. Organizations are not required to report...

  16. Registration and reporting

    Registration and reporting. Federal candidates and political committees must register with the FEC when they reach certain thresholds. Once registered, they file regular reports about their financial activity. This website's help for candidates and committees section explains the reporting requirements that apply to each committee type.

  17. PDF Report to Congress Restructuring the Department of Defense Acquisition

    Report to Congress Restructuring the Department of Defense Acquisition, Technology and Logistics Organization and Chief Management Officer Organization ... The new organization's performance must be guided by and measured against the National Defense Strategy (NDS). USD(R&E) will focus on closing the gap on current and emerging ...

  18. Congressional Review Act

    The Congressional Review Act requires GAO to report on major rules that federal agencies make, including summaries of the procedural steps taken by the agencies. Federal agencies promulgating rules must submit a copy to both houses of Congress and GAO before the rules can take effect. (Congressional Review Act, 5 U.S.C.§ 801 (a) (1) (A) ).

  19. Documents for Congress

    Congressional Presentation Document for Fiscal Year 2022. June 1, 2021. Report. Report to Congress on Proposed Refugee Admissions for Fiscal Year 2022. September 20, 2021. Report. Report to Congress on the Proposed Emergency Presidential Determination on Refugee Admissions for Fiscal Year 2021. February 12, 2021. Report.

  20. As Congress backs farmers' MSP demand, what has the govt committee set

    Its other members are (i) NITI Aayog member (Agriculture) Ramesh Chand, (ii) two agricultural economists, (iii) an award-winning farmer, (iv) five representatives of farmers' organisations other than the Samyukta Kisan Morcha (SKM), (v) two representatives of farmers' cooperatives/ groups, (vi) one member of the Commission for Agricultural Costs and Prices (CACP), (vii) three persons from ...

  21. Live updates: Trump ordered to pay nearly $355 million in civil ...

    A judge has ordered former President Donald Trump and his companies to pay nearly $355 million in a ruling in the New York civil fraud case. Follow here for the latest live news updates.

  22. Text

    Text for H.Res.1021 - 118th Congress (2023-2024): Providing the sense of the House of Representatives that the political persecution of President Donald J. Trump is morally unjustifiable and has damaged institutional trust to an extraordinary degree; that the Biden administration's weaponization of the Federal Government against Donald Trump, the Republican Party's nominee for President in ...

  23. PDF Federal Information Security Modernization Act of 2014

    FISMA FY 2020 Annual Report to Congress 2 The Office of Management and Budget (OMB) is publishing this report in accordance with the Federal Information Security Modernization Act of 2014 (FISMA ...

  24. PDF US-CERT Federal Incident Notification Guidelines

    This document provides guidance to Federal Government departments and agencies (D/As); state, local, tribal, and territorial government entities; Information Sharing and Analysis Organizations; and foreign, commercial, and private-sector organizations for submitting incident notifications to the National Cybersecurity and Communications Integrat...

  25. Opinion

    Special counsel Robert K. Hur, in a devastating 345-page report on his investigation into President Biden's mishandling of classified documents, concludes that Biden "willfully retained and ...

  26. The Congressional Review Act: Defining a "Rule" and Overturning a Rule

    The CRA requires agencies to submit a report containing a copy of the rule and information on the rule to Congress and to the Government Accountability Office (GAO). Once the rule is received, if Members wish to submit and take action on a joint resolution of disapproval, they must do so within certain time periods specified in the CRA.

  27. Special counsel report concludes Biden willfully retained ...

    Special counsel Robert Hur released a searing report Thursday that concluded President Joe Biden willfully retained and disclosed classified military and national security information but will not ...

  28. How to File a Beneficial Ownership Report for Your Small Business

    As of January 1, 2024, FinCEN has begun accepting beneficial ownership information reports. Here are four steps you can take to prepare your corporate transparency report. 1. Determine whether your business is required to file. Under the CTA, LLCs and corporations must file beneficial ownership information reports unless they qualify for an ...