Programs and courses

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English (ENG)

The following courses are offered by the Faculty of Arts.

ENG 1100 Workshop in Essay Writing (3 units)

Intensive practice in academic essay writing. Emphasis on grammatical and well-reasoned expository writing, essay organization, preparation of research papers, and proper acknowledgment of sources. Frequent written exercises and development of composition skills. Use of Writing Centre resources required outside regular class hours.

Course Component: Lecture

ENG 1112 Technical Report Writing (3 units)

Practice in the writing of technical reports. Topics include exposition, argumentation, presentation of technical data, and effective communication. Frequent written exercises and development of composition skills. Use of Writing Centre resources required outside regular class hours.

Course Component: Discussion Group, Lecture

ENG 1120 Selected Topics in Literature and Composition (3 units)

Development of critical reading skills and coherent discourse. Study of the proper use and acknowledgement of sources. Topics-based readings in multiple genres provide matter for discussion and frequent written assignments. Not repeatable for credit. Not intended for English Majors or Honours students.

ENG 1124 Engaging with Literature (3 units)

Engagement with a specific literary topic in order to develop skills of thought and writing that will be employed throughout the rest of the degree, including analysis and evaluation of evidence, critical and speculative thinking, formulating and solving problems, forms of argumentation, written communication, and presentation. Emphasis is placed on engagement with philosophical, ethical, social, historical, and cultural problems in the process of talking, thinking, and writing about literature. Topics will vary.

ENG 1131 Effective Business English (3 units)

Development of skills in written communication. Review of grammatical usage and basic principles of composition. Analysis of samples of effective business prose.

Reserved for students enrolled in a baccalaureate program of the School of Management.

ENG 1140 Introduction to Indigenous Literatures (3 units)

Introduction to traditional and contemporary Indigenous Literatures. Genres, forms, topics, and regions of focus may vary.

ENG 1141 Reading the Contemporary World (3 units)

Designed for students new to our English programs, this introductory course focuses on contemporary literatures, including forms and genres popular in the twenty-first century, such as genre fiction, digital poetry, memoir, and graphic literature. Texts will be studied according to new creative ideas that have influenced writing in this century so far and their related social and cultural contexts.

ENG 1320 English Grammar for Professional Writers and Editors (3 units)

Practical and theoretical instruction in English grammar including parts of speech, phrases, clauses, and punctuation. Students will learn to analyze sentence structure and correct common grammatical, syntactical, and stylistic errors.

ENG 2105 Introduction to British Literature Before 1700 (3 units)

An introduction to authors, works, and movements in British literature before 1700 in their social, cultural, and historical contexts. An emphasis will be placed on helping students understand the language and worldview of the authors, readers, and audiences of these earlier period texts. Genres, forms, topics, and regions of focus may vary.

ENG 2106 Introduction to British Literature After 1700 (3 units)

An introduction to authors, works, and movements in British literature written after 1700 in their social, cultural, and historical contexts. Genres, forms, topics, and regions of focus may vary.

ENG 2107 Introduction to Canadian Literature (3 units)

An introduction to authors, works, and movements in Canadian Literature in their social, cultural, and historical contexts. Genres, forms, topics, and regions of focus may vary.

Previously ENG 2101 or ENG 2102.

ENG 2108 Introduction to American Literature (3 units)

An introduction to authors, works, and movements in American literature in their social, cultural, and historical contexts. Genres, forms, topics, and regions of focus may vary.

Previously ENG 2103 or ENG 2104.

ENG 2110 Children's Literature (3 units)

Introduction to children's literature, from classics like Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Charlotte's Web to modern works like Where the Wild Things Are and Harry Potter.

ENG 2111 Canadian Children's Literature (3 units)

Introduction to Canadian children's literature, through a wide variety of forms (novels, chapter books, rhymes, picture books) and genres (realism, science fiction, fantasy, time-travel, aboriginal legend, and nonsense verse).

ENG 2112 Classical Backgrounds of English Literature (3 units)

Study of major works of classical antiquity– such as Homer's Odyssey, Ovid's Metamorphoses, or Virgil's Aeneid - and their various influences on English literary traditions.

ENG 2113 The Bible and the History of English Literature (3 units)

Introduction to the ways in which engagement with the Bible - as a subject of translation and adaptation; a repository of characters, stories, images, and themes; a touchstone of aesthetic and cultural authority - has shaped English literature.

ENG 2114 Women and Literature to 1900 (3 units)

Study of literary works, ranging from antiquity and the Middle Ages up to 1900, by and about women, addressing questions of gender, sexuality, power, and representation.

ENG 2115 Women and Literature 1900 to the Present (3 units)

Study of literary works, produced between 1900 and the present, by and about women, addressing questions of gender, sexuality, power, and representation.

ENG 2116 Writing Out: Literature and Sexual Identity (3 units)

A study of the literary representation and cultural construction of gender and sexual identities, in part through the works of important lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender writers.

ENG 2117 Multicultural Literatures (3 units)

A study of literature reflecting the cultural diversity of the contemporary world: themes of identity, community, and difference are examined in the context of colonialism, immigration, and globalization.

ENG 2118 Comic Books and Graphic Novels (3 units)

An introduction to the history of comic books and graphic novels, as they have evolved to mix pop-cultural media with serious artistic ambitions, text and image, the narrative and the visual, individual authorship and collaboration.

ENG 2120 Tales of Mystery and Detection (3 units)

An introduction to the detective story and mystery tale, from 19th-century innovators like Edgar Allan Poe and Arthur Conan Doyle to modern expressions in literature and film.

ENG 2124 Second-Year Seminar (3 units)

An introduction to key concepts, established methodologies, and theoretical approaches to literary study through concentrated, practical work on a specific topic or problem. While fostering the kinds of independent research and presentation that will characterize seminar and special topics courses at the 4000-level, this course emphasizes the ability to develop and address conceptually informed questions about literary texts in the form of class discussion, presentations, and papers. Topics will vary.

Course Component: Seminar

Prerequisite: ENG 1124 .

ENG 2130 Traditions of King Arthur (3 units)

A study of the evolution of the story-world of King Arthur's court, from the Middle Ages to the present, in literature, visual representation, and film

ENG 2131 Fantasy Literature (3 units)

Introduction to fantasy as a genre in literature and other media, investigating its thematic concern with the environment, technology, nostalgia, loss, and modernity.

ENG 2132 Utopian Fiction (3 units)

Study of the representation of the ideal society (utopia) and its nightmarish inversion (dystopia), from classics like Plato's Republic and Thomas More's Utopia to modern literary and film masterpieces.

ENG 2133 Literature, Madness, and Desire (3 units)

Study of the literary representation of mental illness, trauma, sex, and desire through a psychological perspective, exploring the history of literature's imagined effects on what we have variously called the psyche, soul, or self.

ENG 2135 Science Fiction (3 units)

Study of the distinctive forms, styles, and themes of science fiction, from its origins in utopian and apocalyptic literatures to its contemporary concern with the technological, ecological, biological, and temporal transformation of human life.

ENG 2136 Fiction of Horror (3 units)

A study of the fiction of horror and the supernatural, from classics of the 18th and 19th centuries, such as Dracula and Frankenstein, to contemporary novels, graphic novels, comics, and film.

ENG 2137 The Politics of Literature (3 units)

A study of the engagements between politics and literature, which may include both the political ends of literature for writers and readers (liberation, protest, radicalism, polemic, persuasion, propaganda) and the influence of politics on literary practices (patronage, censorship, copyright and libel laws, interest, ideology).

ENG 2140 Literature and Film (3 units)

Analysis of the relationships between literature, film, and television, with a view to illuminating the distinctive strategies and formal properties that both connect and separate these art forms.

ENG 2141 Literature and the Environment (3 units)

A study of literature from an ecological or environmental perspective, asking how literary culture both shapes and is shaped by the natural environment and our relationships with it.

ENG 2142 World Literatures in English (3 units)

Study of global literatures in English, including those of India, Africa, Australia, New Zealand, and the Caribbean

ENG 2151 Literature and the Sciences (3 units)

Study of the relationship between literature and the sciences, including literary texts' representation of the sciences, and literary aspects of scientific writing.

ENG 2175 Introduction to the Literatures of Asia and the Asian Diaspora (3 units)

An introduction to authors, works, and movements in the literatures of Asia and the Asian Diaspora in their social, cultural, and historical contexts. The focus will be on English-language texts, but some texts in translation may be included. Genres, forms, topics, and regions of focus may vary.

ENG 2176 Introduction to the Literatures of Africa and the African Diaspora (3 units)

An introduction to authors, works, and movements in the literatures of Africa and the African Diaspora in their social, cultural, and historical contexts. The focus will be on English-language texts, but some texts in translation may be included. Genres, forms, topics, and regions of focus may vary.

ENG 2180 Critical Conversations: Sex and Gender Identities (3 units)

This course considers representations of gender and sex identities within literary texts as well as how sex and gender have shaped the ways that literature is produced, read, and talked about. Topics may include feminist literary experimentation; 2SLGBTQIA+ visibility in historical and contemporary writing; intersections among sex, gender, race, and class identities in literary texts; and the history of women’s authorship and publishing.

ENG 2181 Critical Conversations: Race and Decolonization (3 units)

This course explores literary texts as important resources for learning about race and colonialism, with an emphasis on authors who advocate for racial justice and decolonization. Topics may include race and belonging; slavery and its afterlives; the politics of education, language, and publication; Indigenous knowledge systems; land, property, and stewardship; and critical analysis of settler colonialism.

ENG 2182 Critical Conversations: Environmental Humanities (3 units)

This course considers how nature, the environment, and human/nonhuman relations are represented within literary texts and how literary texts have contributed to public debates about environmental issues. Topics may include space, place, and embodiment; animal studies and posthumanism; ecopoetics; the Anthropocene and the climate crisis; and environmental and climate justice.

ENG 2183 Critical Conversations: Class, Capitalism, and Culture (3 units)

This course will explore some of the key concepts and approaches to literary study related to socioeconomic class and capitalism. Topics may include labour conditions and workers’ rights; poverty; social and economic hierarchies; the history of collective organizing; and the relationships between social activism and literary representation.

ENG 2184 Critical Conversations: Form and Style (3 units)

This course will examine how the formal and stylistic aspects of literature have shaped conversations in literary studies. Topics may include the interrelation of form and social movements; experimental writing; constraint and creative games; avant-garde traditions; problems of genre; form and popular culture; the rise of the novel; definitions of “the literary”; and style and identity.

ENG 2185 Critical Conversations: Special Topics (3 units)

The course will examine how a selected topic has led to exciting conversations and debates within literary and scholarly communities. Interested students should consult the Department of English to learn which topic will be offered in a particular semester.

ENG 2301 Introduction to Creative Writing (3 units)

The gateway for all other Creative Writing offerings, this course provides students with an introductory grounding and practical experience in several genres of writing including fiction, poetry, and creative non-fiction.

Prerequisite or corequisite: 3 course units from ( ENG 1100 , ENG 1112 , ENG 1120 , ENG 1124 , ENG 1131 )

ENG 2303 Introduction to Writing Prose Fiction (3 units)

Introduction to prose forms and fictional story-telling techniques. Students will read exemplary works and relevant criticism and will compose their own works of short fiction.

Prerequisite or corequisite: ENG 2301 .

ENG 2304 Introduction to Writing Poetry (3 units)

Introduction to poetic forms and expressive techniques in verse; coordinating form and content. Students will read exemplary works of poetry and relevant criticism and will compose their own poems.

ENG 2305 Introduction to Writing Creative Non-fiction (3 units)

Introduction to creative non-fictional genres such as memoir, personal essay, nature writing, and cultural commentary. Students will read exemplary works and useful criticism and will compose their own works in one or several genres.

Prerequisite: 3 course units from ( ENG 1100 , ENG 1112 , ENG 1120 , ENG 1124 , ENG 1131 ).

ENG 2306 Introduction to Writing for Stage and Screen (3 units)

Introduction to various dramatic forms and the writing of scripts for performance. Students will read exemplary works and relevant criticism and will compose their own short works.

ENG 2307 Writing with Visuals: An Introduction (3 units)

Introduction to forms of creative writing such as graphic fiction, concrete poetry, collage, artists' books and illustrated texts that combine written texts and visual materials. Students will read exemplary works and relevant criticism and will create their own short works.

ENG 2313 European Contexts of English Literature (3 units)

Study of major European literary works - such as Dante's Inferno, Cervantes' Don Quixote, or Kafka's Metamorphosis - that have influenced the development of English literature.

ENG 2370 Writing for Digital Media I: Fundamentals of Digital Literacy (3 units)

Fundamental techniques for evaluating, organizing and presenting information across contemporary media, including interactive hypertext, social media, microblogging, instant messaging, and other platforms.

ENG 2380 Introduction to Technical Writing (3 units)

Fundamental techniques and best-practices for technical writers. Emphasis on clear communication of complex technical information to specific audiences and the creation of efficient end-user documents.

ENG 2381 Writing about the Arts (3 units)

Introduction to non-academic writing about literary and cultural objects, events, and practices. Subjects covered include arts journalism, reviewing books, films and plays, opinion editorials, and artist’s statements.

ENG 3105 Book History: Theories and Methods (3 units)

Study of the central topics and classic texts of the field of Book History. Topics may include the materiality of books; the history and intersections of orality, writing, and print; and digital forms and methods of book production and reading.

Prerequisite: 6 course units in English (ENG).

ENG 3106 Topics in Film Studies (3 units)

A study of film both as an art form with its own histories, genres, and interpretive languages, and as one medium in a broader field of literary and cultural production. Specific topics whether focusing on specific filmmakers, movements, genres, or periods will vary.

ENG 3107 Literature and Visual Culture: Theories and Approaches (3 units)

Formal, aesthetic, and material connections between literary and visual cultures. Theories and approaches to the relationship between text and image in connection to various forms (e.g. illuminated manuscripts, concrete and shaped poetry, graphic fiction, and film.)

ENG 3108 Transatlantic Literature 1700-1900 (3 units)

A study of the circulation of culture around the Atlantic in the period between 1700 and 1900, which linked literary communities in Britain, North America, the Caribbean, and Africa.

ENG 3109 Transnational Literatures 1900-Present (3 units)

A study of transnational literary networks and the movement of texts and traditions across or outside of the boundaries (political, cultural, linguistic) of the modern nation since 1900.

ENG 3110 Canadian Drama (3 units)

A study of dramatic literature produced in Canada, with an emphasis on the period since 1950. The course may include attendance of theatre performances in the Ottawa area.

ENG 3111 Poetics (3 units)

Major theoretical concepts pertaining to poetry and its criticism. Theoretical contributions to understanding the meaning of poetry and function in society. Poetry as distinct literary art. Figurative language and poetic form. Relationship between types of poetry and politics. Impact of various schools, movements and aesthetic approaches on Western poetic tradition.

ENG 3112 Narrative Genres: Theories and Approaches (3 units)

Narrative as a meaning-making system. Functions of narrative. Different narrative genres and theoretical debates that have shaped our understanding of the story-telling mode. Relationship between fictional narrative and "truth-telling discourses".

ENG 3133 Elizabethan Shakespeare (3 units)

Survey of Shakespeare's work to c. 1603.

ENG 3134 Jacobean Shakespeare (3 units)

Survey of Shakespeare's work after c. 1603.

ENG 3135 Early Modern Drama (3 units)

Study of the major dramatic authors and works of Early Modern period, excluding Shakespeare, between 1485 and the closing of the English theatres in 1642.

ENG 3164 Advanced Workshop in Poetry (3 units)

Advanced Workshop in the writing of poetry. The focus will be on writing exercises, peer review, and the development of the student's portfolio.

Prerequisite: ENG 2304 with a grade of B or higher or permission from the instructor.

ENG 3170 Writing for Digital Media II (3 units)

Writing techniques and strategies appropriate to new media such as the web (including interactive hypertexts), social media, microblogging, instant messaging, and other platforms. Applications for journalism, communication, activism, government, marketing, and the arts will be considered.

Prerequisite: ENG 2370 or permission from the instructor.

ENG 3171 Communication in the Information Age (3 units)

Practice and analysis of information management in the digital era. Appropriate techniques for gathering, organizing, and presenting information about current events across the various platforms today.

ENG 3180 Editing Documents for Business, Science, and Technology (3 units)

Overview of editorial processes in business, science, and technology contexts. Students will learn how to edit for organization, clarity, and style; create and follow “in-house” style sheets; use copy editing marks and symbols; and employ the editing functions of various word-processing and document-sharing applications and platforms.

ENG 3181 Editing in Arts and Humanities Publishing (3 units)

Overview of standard editorial processes in academic and literary publishing. Students will learn techniques and best practices for developmental and copy editing, including how to edit for clarity and style, create and follow “in-house” style sheets, use copy editing marks and symbols, and employ the editing functions of various word-processing and document-sharing applications and platforms.

ENG 3182 Policy Writing and Writing for Government (3 units)

Theory and practice of writing in various governmental contexts, including the development of policy documents. Students will learn about written communications within government, and between government and the public, study the discourses in common use, and get experience writing in different forms and media.

ENG 3190 Speculative Genres (3 units)

Speculative writing (including science fiction, fantasy, horror, futurisms, dystopian fiction, and other such modes) has become prominent in recent years across a variety of literary venues and global regions. This course will examine speculative writing and the significant role it plays in literary and cultural studies today. Texts studied may include works of fiction, drama, graphic literature, and poetry, and in some cases related artistic media, such as film, television, podcasts, and online video.

ENG 3191 Gender, Sexuality, and Literature (3 units)

This course considers representations of gender and sexuality within literature as well as cultural ideas about gender and sexuality that shape literary texts. Works studied may include contemporary writing and/or literature from past centuries. Topics may include feminist movements; gendered plot forms; 2SLGBTQIA+ orientations and literary representation; queer literary history; literary critiques of gender binaries; and intersections between gender, sexuality, race, and ableism.

ENG 3192 African American Literature (3 units)

This course will trace the development of a distinctive tradition of African American literature from the colonial period through the present. Readings will showcase periods of exceptional creative output, such as the Harlem Renaissance and the Black Arts Movement, as well as the work of selected major figures, such as James Baldwin, Toni Morrison, and Octavia Butler.

ENG 3193 Advanced Study in Children's Literature (3 units)

A study of literature written for and/or enjoyed by children. This literature, often marginalized in the traditional academy and curricula, provides students with a unique window into competing narratives of literary history and literary merit. Because of the broad age range of the target audience for these books, the topics, genres, and forms studied will vary. Students may also have the opportunity to work on a digital humanities project.

ENG 3194 Young Adult Literature (3 units)

A study of literary works written for or marketed to teenagers. YA literature offers a sophisticated barometer on the social world and creates opportunities for energetic explorations of form and genre. Course texts may include fiction, poetry, graphic novels, and non-fiction. Students may also have the opportunity to work on a digital humanities project.

ENG 3195 Critical Race Theory (3 units)

Critical Race Theory, initially developed in legal studies, has become highly influential in analyses of literary texts in recent decades. This course is an introduction to the work of key thinkers, such as Christina Sharpe, Stuart Hall, Gloria Anzaldúa, Patricia Williams, Cathy Park Hong, and Leanne Betasamosake Simpson. Topics may include race as a social construct; social and legal structures that promote racial hierarchies; liberal modes of identification; racial justice initiatives; race, land, and property; slavery and its aftermaths; racial capital; and the intersections of racism, sexism, ableism, and homophobia.

ENG 3303 Advanced Workshop in Prose Fiction (3 units)

Advanced Workshop in the writing of fiction. The focus will be on writing exercises, peer review, and the development of the student's portfolio.

Prerequisite: ENG 2303 with a grade of B or higher

ENG 3305 Advanced Workshop in Creative Non-fiction (3 units)

Advanced Workshop in the writing of creative non-fiction. The focus will be on writing exercises, peer review, and the development of the student's portfolio.

Prerequisite: ENG 2305 with a grade of B or higher.

ENG 3306 Advanced Workshop in Scriptwriting (3 units)

Advanced Workshop in the writing of scripts for various performance genres. The focus will be on writing exercises, peer review, and the development of the student's portfolio.

Prerequisite: ENG 2306 with a grade of B or higher.

ENG 3307 Advanced Workshop in Comics and Graphic Fiction (3 units)

Advanced workshop in graphic fiction and comic book writing. Students will work on both the textual and visual dimensions of this popular art form. The focus will be on creative exercises, peer review, and the development of the student's portfolio.

Prerequisite: ENG 2307 with a grade of B or higher.

ENG 3318 Romantic Literature (3 units)

Study of major poets and prose writers of the Romantic period.

ENG 3320 Modern British Literature (3 units)

Selected prose and poetry of the 20th century.

ENG 3321 Canadian Short Story (3 units)

Short story in Canada from the 19th century to the present.

ENG 3323 Medieval Literature I (3 units)

Study of major works of the period, including Chaucer.

ENG 3324 Medieval Literature II (3 units)

A study of medieval British literature in the period between 1000 and 1500, bridging the gaps between Old English, Anglo-Norman, and Middle English, and emphasizing diversities, disruptions, and innovations in language, culture, and literary form.

ENG 3339 Sixteenth-Century Literature (3 units)

Study of major works of the period.

ENG 3340 Seventeenth-Century Literature (3 units)

ENG 3341 Eighteenth-Century Literature (3 units)

ENG 3349 Restoration and 18th-Century Drama (3 units)

Development of English drama from 1660 to 1800.

ENG 3356 18th-Century and Romantic Fiction (3 units)

Readings in the 18th- and early 19th-century novel.

ENG 3362 Victorian Literature (3 units)

Study of major poets and prose writers of the Victorian period.

ENG 3364 Victorian Fiction (3 units)

Study of major Victorian novelists.

ENG 3370 Modern British Poetry (3 units)

Study of major poets of the 20th century.

ENG 3371 Modern Drama (3 units)

Development of modern drama from the late 19th century to the present, with some attention to important continental influences.

ENG 3372 Modern Short Story (3 units)

Study of modern short story writers.

ENG 3373 Modern British Novelists (3 units)

Major British novelists from 1900 to 1950.

ENG 3374 Topics in the Environmental Humanities (3 units)

Study of the interrelations between literature, culture, and environmental practice. Topics may include human/animal relations; the Anthropocene; mindfulness and climate change; or literatures of social and environmental justice.

ENG 3375 Critical Theory (3 units)

Advanced study and practice of contemporary critical methodologies.

ENG 3376 Contemporary Novel (3 units)

Study of major English, American and Commonwealth novels since 1950.

ENG 3377 American Fiction of the 19th Century (3 units)

Study of selected novelists, including Hawthorne, Melville, James, and Twain.

ENG 3378 American Fiction 1900 to the Present (3 units)

Study of significant novelists and their works.

ENG 3379 American Poetry 1900 to the Present (3 units)

Study of selected poets.

ENG 3381 Indigenous Literatures (3 units)

Study of different forms of Indigenous literature in English.

ENG 3383 Jewish Canadian Writers (3 units)

A study of the works of Jewish Canadian writers in English. Also offered as JCS 3383 .

ENG 3384 Literatures of Exploration and Settlement in Canada (3 units)

Study of settler colonial texts, works by Indigenous authors, narratives of Black freedom-seekers, and writings by other diasporic authors in early Canada.

ENG 3385 Canadian Literature of the Confederation Period (1867-1912) (3 units)

Study of selected writers and works.

ENG 3386 Canadian Fiction 1900 to 1950 (3 units)

Study of selected fiction writers.

ENG 3387 Canadian Fiction 1950 to the Present (3 units)

ENG 3388 Canadian Poetry 1900 to the Present (3 units)

A study of major poets from Pratt and F.R. Scott to Layton, Cohen, and Atwood.

ENG 3389 Writing Resistance in the English Literatures (3 units)

Study of literary works in English that analyze and critique empire, colonialism, and globalization.

ENG 3390 Special Topic (3 units)

See Department brochure.

Prerequisite: 6 course units in English (ENG) and permission of the Department.

ENG 4115 Medieval Literature: Seminar (3 units)

Advanced, small-group study of Medieval literature. Focus of investigation will vary from year to year. See Department brochure and/or website.

Prerequisite: 81 university units including ENG 2124 . Reserved for students registered in the Honours B.A. in English, with Major in English, or Medieval and Renaissance Studies programs.

ENG 4120 Literary Theory: Seminar (3 units)

New developments in literary criticism and theory from the mid-twentieth century to the present. See Department brochure and/or website.

ENG 4130 Medieval Literature: Special Topic (3 units)

Intensive study of Medieval literature. Topic and methodology will vary from year to year. See Department brochure and/or website.

ENG 4131 Literary Theory: Special Topic (3 units)

Intensive study in literary criticism and/or theory. Topic and methodology will vary from year to year. See Department brochure and/or website.

ENG 4133 Shakespeare: Special Topic (3 units)

Intensive study of Shakespeare. Topic and methodology will vary from year to year. See Department brochure and/or website.

ENG 4134 Renaissance: Special Topic (3 units)

Intensive study of Renaissance literature. Topic and methodology will vary from year to year. See Department brochure and/or website.

Prerequisite: 81 university units including ENG 2124 . Reserved for students registered in the Honours B.A. in English, with Major in English, or Medieval and Renaissance Studies programs

ENG 4135 Eighteenth Century: Special Topic (3 units)

Intensive study of eighteenth-century literature. Topic and methodology will vary from year to year. See Department brochure and/or website.

Prerequisite: 81 university units including ENG 2124 . Reserved for students registered in the Honours B.A. in English, with Major in English programs.

ENG 4136 Romantics: Special Topic (3 units)

Intensive study of Romantic-era literature. Topic and methodology will vary from year to year. See Department brochure and/or website.

ENG 4137 Victorian Literature: Special Topic (3 units)

Intensive study of Victorian literature. Topic and methodology will vary from year to year. See Department brochure and/or website.

ENG 4138 Modern British Literature: Special Topic (3 units)

Intensive study of Modern British literature. Topic and methodology will vary from year to year. See Department brochure and/or website.

ENG 4139 American Literature: Special Topic (3 units)

Intensive study of American literature. Topic and methodology will vary from year to year. See Department brochure and/or website.

ENG 4142 Shakespeare: Seminar (3 units)

Advanced, small-group study of Shakespeare. Focus of investigation will vary from year to year. See Department brochure and/or website.

ENG 4148 Renaissance: Seminar (3 units)

Advanced, small-group study of Renaissance literature. Focus of investigation will vary from year to year. See Department brochure and/or website.

ENG 4151 Eighteenth Century: Seminar (3 units)

Advanced, small-group study of eighteenth-century literature. Focus of investigation will vary from year to year. See Department brochure and/or website.

ENG 4152 Romantics: Seminar (3 units)

Advanced, small-group study of Romantic-era literature. Focus of investigation will vary from year to year. See Department brochure and/or website.

ENG 4165 Victorian Literature: Seminar (3 units)

Advanced, small-group study of Victorian literature. Focus of investigation will vary from year to year. See Department brochure and/or website.

ENG 4175 Modern British Literature: Seminar (3 units)

Advanced, small-group study of Modern British literature. Focus of investigation will vary from year to year. See Department brochure and/or website.

Prerequisite: 81 university units. Reserved for students registered in the Honours B.A. in English, or with Major in English, or the Latin and English Studies programs.

ENG 4180 American Literature: Seminar (3 units)

Advanced, small-group study of American literature. Focus of investigation will vary from year to year. See Department brochure and/or website.

ENG 4182 Canadian Literature: Seminar (3 units)

Advanced, small-group study of Canadian literature. Focus of investigation will vary from year to year. See Department brochure and/or website.

ENG 4184 American and Canadian Literature: Seminar (3 units)

Advance, small-group study of cross-border relations between Canadian and American literature. Seminar content varies from year to year. See Department brochure and/or website.

ENG 4185 Contemporary Literature: Seminar (3 units)

Advanced, small-group study of one or more aspects of contemporary literature. Focus of investigation will vary from year to year. See Department brochure and/or website.

Prerequisite: 81 university units including ENG 2124 . Reserved for students registered in the Honours B.A. in English, or with Major in English programs.

ENG 4186 Literature and Culture: Seminar (3 units)

Advanced, small-group study of literature according to particular cultural contexts, forms, ideas, practices and/or media. Focus of investigation will vary from year to year. See Department brochure and/or website.

ENG 4188 World Literatures in English: Seminar (3 units)

Advanced, small-group study of literatures in English originating outside the British, American and Canadian national traditions. Focus of investigation will vary from year to year. See Department brochure and/or website.

ENG 4189 Postcolonial Literatures: Seminar (3 units)

Advanced small-group study of postcolonial, indigenous, diasporic and/or transnational Anglophone literatures. Focus of investigation will vary from year to year. See Department brochure and/or website.

ENG 4330 Canadian Literature: Special Topic (3 units)

Intensive study of Canadian literature. Topic and methodology will vary from year to year. See Department brochure and/or website.

ENG 4331 World Literatures in English: Special Topic (3 units)

Intensive study of literatures in English originating outside the British, American and Canadian national traditions. Topic and methodology will vary from year to year. See Department brochure and/or website.

ENG 4332 Postcolonial Literatures: Special Topic (3 units)

Intensive study of postcolonial, indigenous, diasporic and/or transnational Anglophone literatures. Topic and methodology will vary from year to year. See Department brochure and/or website.

ENG 4394 Unassigned Special Topic (3 units)

See Department brochure and/or website.

ENG 4395 Senior Honours Essay (3 units)

Permission of the Department is required.

ENG 4397 Creative Writing Seminar: Selected Genres (3 units)

A capstone course for the Creative Writing minor and certificate programs, this seminar focuses on a particular genre selected by the professor. Students will work on their writing with a view to eventual publication and/or graduate study.

Prerequisite: 3 course units from ( ENG 3164 , ENG 3303 , ENG 3305 , ENG 3306 , ENG 3307 ).

ENG 4398 Creative Writing Seminar: Special Topics in Poetry (3 units)

A capstone course for the Creative Writing minor and certificate programs, this seminar focuses on a special topic in poetry. Students will work on their writing with a view to eventual publication and/or graduate study.

ENG 4399 Creative Writing Seminar: Special Topics in Fiction (3 units)

A capstone course the Creative Writing minor and certificate programs, this seminar focuses on a special topic in fiction. Students will work on their writing with a view to eventual publication and/or graduate study.

ENG 6111 Directed Readings I (3 units)

Course Component: Research

ENG 6112 Directed Readings II (3 units)

ENG 6300 Old English I (3 units)

ENG 6301 Old English II (3 units)

ENG 6302 Research Methodology (1.5 unit)

Preparation of students for the professional study of English and for the application of graduate level research skills to non-academic careers. Review and analysis of electronic and print research tools and methods. Internet database searches, both in the discipline of English as well as in related fields (such as history, philosophy, and sociology), and evaluation of Internet sites. Short assignments developing skills in academic and non-academic research. Preparation of grant applications and of the thesis proposal (for students in the MA with thesis program). Graded S (Satisfactory) / NS (Not satisfactory). Offered in the fall session.

ENG 6303 Professional Development (1.5 unit)

Preparation of students for careers involving graduate level research and communication skills, including teaching, university research, and non-academic careers. Introduction to academic and non-academic professional activities: writing and publishing scholarly articles, and research reports, disseminating research results through academic and non-academic presentations, networking, participation in conferences and professional associations, and career planning for both academic and non-academic career paths for holders of graduate degrees. Sessions to be devoted to the practice of teaching, covering such topics as syllabus construction, teaching 'styles,' classroom management, teaching dossiers, student evaluation, and the application of teaching skills to non-academic goals such as presentations and team-building. Graded S (Satisfactory) / NS (Not satisfactory). Offered in the winter session.

ENG 6304 Doctoral Research Methods (3 units)

Overview of theoretical, methodological, and critical approaches to literary studies to enable students to situate their own research within the discipline.

ENG 6310 Middle English Literature I (3 units)

ENG 6313 Directed Reading (3 units)

ENG 6320 Middle English Literature (3 units)

ENG 6321 Middle English Literature III (3 units)

ENG 6322 Middle English Literature IV (3 units)

ENG 6330 Renaissance Literature I (3 units)

ENG 6341 Shakespeare I (3 units)

ENG 6342 Shakespeare II (3 units)

ENG 6343 Shakespeare III (3 units)

ENG 6344 Shakespeare IV (3 units)

ENG 6350 Renaissance Literature II (3 units)

ENG 6351 Renaissance Literature III (3 units)

ENG 6352 Renaissance Literature IV (3 units)

ENG 6355 Restoration Literature (3 units)

ENG 6356 Restoration Literature II (3 units)

ENG 6357 Restoration Literature III (3 units)

ENG 6360 Eighteenth Century Literature I (3 units)

ENG 6361 Eighteenth Century Literature II (3 units)

ENG 6362 Eighteenth-Century Literature III (3 units)

ENG 6363 Eighteenth-Century Literature IV (3 units)

ENG 6370 Romantic Literature I (3 units)

ENG 6371 Romantic Literature II (3 units)

ENG 6372 Romantic Literature III (3 units)

ENG 6373 Romantic Literature IV (3 units)

ENG 6380 Victorian Literature I (3 units)

ENG 6381 Victorian Literature II (3 units)

ENG 6382 Victorian Literature III (3 units)

ENG 6383 Victorian Literature IV (3 units)

ENG 6999 Major Research Paper

The research paper is prepared under the direction of the research paper supervisor and is approved by the graduate committee. The research paper must be successfully completed by the end of the third session of full-time registration in the master's program. In the event of failure, the student must register for an additional session. A second failure leads to a grade of NS (Not satisfactory) on the transcript and to withdrawal from the program.

Volet / Course Component: Recherche / Research

Prerequisites: 15 units at the 5000, 6000, 7000 or 8000 level

ENG 7300 Modern Literature I (3 units)

ENG 7301 Modern Literature II (3 units)

ENG 7302 Modern Literature III (3 units)

ENG 7303 Literature and History of the Disciplines (3 units)

Various topics related to the history of the study of literature and how it has intersected with other fields. Specific topics will be announced each year.

ENG 7310 American Literature I (3 units)

ENG 7311 American Literature II (3 units)

ENG 7312 American Literature III (3 units)

ENG 7313 American Literature IV (3 units)

ENG 7320 Canadian Literature I (3 units)

ENG 7321 Canadian Literature II (3 units)

ENG 7322 Canadian Literature III (3 units)

ENG 7323 Canadian Literature IV (3 units)

ENG 7330 Twentieth-Century and Contemporary Literature I (3 units)

Various topics related to twentieth-century and contemporary literature up to the present day. Specific topics will be announced each year.

ENG 7331 Twentieth-Century and Contemporary Literature II (3 units)

Various topics related to twentieth-century and contemporary literature up to the present moment. Specific topics will be announced each year.

ENG 7332 Cultural Studies I (3 units)

Various topics in cultural studies. Specific topics will be announced each year.

ENG 7370 History of the English Language (3 units)

ENG 7375 Cultural Studies II (3 units)

ENG 7376 Book History I (3 units)

Various topics in book history. Specific topics will be announced each year.

ENG 7377 Book History II (3 units)

ENG 7380 History of Criticism (3 units)

ENG 7381 Theory of Criticism (3 units)

ENG 7382 Digital Humanities I (3 units)

Various topics in digital humanities. Specific topics will be announced each year.

ENG 7383 Digital Humanities II (3 units)

ENG 7384 Theory of Criticism II (3 units)

ENG 7385 Theory of Criticism III (3 units)

ENG 7386 Special Project (3 units)

Series of open-ended project workshops, including readings exemplifying the art of research in different genres and media (memoir, podcast, lyric essay, video essay, oral history, collage, participant observation, gallery exhibition, etc.). Students will do the reading, debate their findings, and give presentations, but will also develop their own projects over the course of the semester.

ENG 7900 Second Language Requirement

In keeping with the bilingual character of the University, the PhD program has a French language requirement. Students may satisfy this requirement by passing FLS 1000 , the test administered by the Official Languages and Bilingualism Institute, or the departmental language test. The departmental tests are one-hour examinations which require the candidate to translate, with the aid of a dictionary, a passage of literary criticism or another appropriate selection of similar difficulty approximately one page in length. Language testing of languages other than French is normally administered by the Department. Students may also satisfy the language requirement by passing six units of second-year university-level language course(s). These courses are additional to the 18 units required for the degree. In all cases, the minimum passing grade is 66% and leads to an S (Satisfactory) on the transcript for ENG 7900 . NOTE: Students who achieve 65% or higher at the MA level will not be required to retake the test if they continue on to the PhD.

ENG 7997 M. Thesis Proposal

The thesis proposal is prepared under the direction of the thesis supervisor and is approved by the graduate committee. The proposal must normally be successfully completed by the end of the third session. In the event of failure, the proposal can be resubmitted the following session at the latest. A second failure leads to a grade of NS on the transcript and to withdrawal from the program. Graded S (Satisfactory) / NS (Not satisfactory).

Prerequisites: 7.5 units.

ENG 9997 Ph.D. Thesis Proposal

The thesis proposal is prepared under the direction of the thesis supervisor and is approved by the graduate committee after consultation with area experts. The proposal must normally be successfully completed by the end of the seventh session. In the event of failure, the proposal can be resubmitted the following session at the latest. A second failure leads to a grade of NS on the transcript and to withdrawal from the program. Graded S (Satisfactory) / NS (Not satisfactory).

Préalable : 15 crédits. / Prerequisites: 15 units.

ENG 9998 Comprehensive Exam (Ph.D.)

Undergraduate Studies

For more information about undergraduate studies at the University of Ottawa, please refer to your faculty .

Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies

For more information about graduate studies at the University of Ottawa, please refer to your academic unit .

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English (ENG) – Writing

Write here, right now: an interactive introduction to academic writing and research∗.

Aaron Tucker and Paul Chafe (Ryerson University)

Licence: CC BY 4.0

This open-access textbook was developed as a first-year university and college student writing textbook that is intended to facilitate the flipped/blended classroom.

Format: Pressbooks WebBook, EPUB, and PDF

Includes: Learning outcomes, videos, and activities

Reviews: Open Textbook Library

Suggested for:

Eng 1100 workshop in essay writing, the simple math of writing well: writing for the 21st century∗.

Jennie A. Harrop (George Fox University)

Licence: CC BY-NC-SA 4.0

Writing guides abound, but  The Simple Math of Writing Well  is one of a kind. Readers will find its practical approach affirming, encouraging, and informative, and its focus on the basics of linguistic structure releases 21st-century writers to embrace the variety of mediums that define our internet-connected world. As Harrop reminds us in the opening chapters of her book, we write more today than ever before in history: texts, emails, letters, blogs, reports, social media posts, proposals, etc.  The Simple Math of Writing Well  is the first guide that directly addresses the importance of writing well in the Google age.

Formats: Pressbooks WebBook and PDF

Includes: Exercises

ENG 1100 Workshop in Essay Writing [as reference text]

The word on college reading and writing∗.

Monique Babin, Carol Burnell (Clackamas Community College), Susan Pesznecker (Clackamas Community College), Nicole Rosevear (Clackamas Community College), and Jaime Wood (Portland State University) (Open Oregon)

Licence: CC BY-NC 4.0

Written by five college reading and writing instructors, this interactive, multimedia text draws from decades of experience teaching students who are entering the college reading and writing environment for the very first time. It includes examples, exercises, and definitions for just about every reading- and writing-related topic students will encounter in their college courses. Note: U.S.-centric and would require adaptation.

Formats: Pressbooks WebBook, EPUB, PDF, MOBI, and more

Includes: Check Your Understanding activities, glossary, and list of other OER on reading and writing

Writing for Success – 1st Canadian Edition∗

Tara Horkoff (Justice Institute of British Columbia)

Last updated: May 2019

The textbook provides instruction in steps, builds writing, reading, and critical thinking, and combines comprehensive grammar review with an introduction to paragraph writing and composition. Canadian adaptation of English Composition I: Rhetorical Methods-Based .

Includes: Learning objectives, discussion questions, key takeaways, and self-practice exercises

Reviews: eCampusOntario Open Library – BCcampus

Choosing & Using Sources: A Guide to Academic Research∗

Cheryl Lowry (Ohio State University)

This textbook provides a process for academic research and writing, from formulating a research question to selecting good information and using it effectively in research assignments.

Formats: Pressbooks WebBook, PDF, EPUB,  and MOBI

Includes: Videos, self-quizzes, and activities

A Guide to Technical Communications: Strategies & Applications∗

Lynn Hall and Leah Wahlin (Ohio State University)

An open textbook focused on developing both technical and professional communication skills and  designed for Engineering Technical Communications courses at The Ohio State University.  

Formats: Pressbooks WebBook, EPUB, PDF, and MOBI

ENG 1112 Technical Report Writing [sections on job search communications as a supplementary resource]

Technical writing∗.

Annemarie Hamlin and Chris Rubio (Central Oregon Community College) (OpenOregon)

This open textbook offers students of technical writing an introduction to the processes and  products involved in professional, workplace, and technical writing. The text is broken up into sections reflecting key components of researching, developing, and producing a technical report. Readers will also learn about other professional communication, designing documents, and creating and integrating graphics. Written especially for an academic setting, this book provides readers with guidance on information literacy and documenting sources. 

ENG 1112 Technical Report Writing

Technical writing essentials: introduction to professional communications in the technical fields∗.

Suzan Last (University of Victoria)

This open textbook is designed to introduce readers to the basics of professional communications in technical fields: audience and task analysis in workplace contexts, clear and concise communications style, effective document design, teamwork and collaboration, and fundamental research skills.

Includes: Learning objectives and exercises

Open Technical Writing – An Open-Access Text for Instruction in Technical and Professional Writing∗

Adam Rex Pope (University of Arkansas Fayetteville)

Last updated: April 2020

Licence: CC BY-SA 4.0

This book presents technical writing as an approach to researching and carrying out writing that centers on technical subject matter. Each and every chapter is devoted to helping students understand that good technical writing is situationally aware and context-driven. Technical writing doesn’t work off knowing the one true right way of doing things—there is no magic report template out there that will always work. Instead, the focus is on offering students a series of approaches they can use to map out their situations and do research accordingly.

Formats: Website and PDF

Includes: Section break questions

ENG 2380 Introduction to Technical Writing

Technical communication∗.

Chelsea Milbourne, Anne Regan, Morgan Livingston, and Sadie Johann (California Polytechnic State University-San Luis Obispo)

Last updated: March 2020

This text explores the principles of technical communication. In addition to producing clear and easy-to-read documents, students will also examine the rhetorical dimensions of writing for technical environments. The class begins by analyzing the argumentative and stylistic conventions that govern technical communication. Through this critical analysis, students determine which conventions constitute the field’s “best practices” and will learn to incorporate these within their own compositions.

ENG 1112 Technical Report Writing [sections 1, 3 and 5]

Mindful technical writing: an introduction to the fundamentals.

Dawn Atkinson and Stacey Corbitt (Montana Technological University)

An open textbook designed for use in co-requisite course pairings of developmental writing and introductory technical writing, or indeed in other lower-division college writing courses that focus on building study skills alongside effective workplace and academic writing skills. It offers a no-cost alternative to commercial products, combining practical guidance with interactive exercises and thoughtfully designed writing opportunities.

This book’s modular design and ample coverage of topics and genres mean that it can be used flexibly over semester-long or stretch courses, allowing instructors and students to select the chapters that are most relevant for their needs. By blending new material with reviews of key topics, such as academic integrity, the chapters provide fresh perspectives on matters vital to the development of strong writing skills.

Format: PDF

ENG 1100 Workshop in Essay Writing [especially Unit IX: Producing Academic Writing]

Business writing style guide∗.

John Morris and Julie Zwart (Oregon State University)

The goals of this book are  to help students: apply basic concepts for effective and concise business writing; compile a well-written report acceptable within a business context; follow a writing process designed for business students; demonstrate critical thinking, reasoning, and persuasion; communicate in writing using a business model; apply resources for improving business writing skills.  

Includes: Exercises and examples

ENG 1131 Effective Business English

Business communication for success∗.

University of Minnesota Libraries Publishing

Business Communication for Success  (BCS) provides a comprehensive, integrated approach to the study and application of written and oral business communication to serve both student and professor.

Includes: Learning objectives, introductory exercises, key takeaways, in-chapter assignments, and post-chapter assessments

Reviews: Open Textbook Library – BCcampus

Conventions 101: A Functional Approach to Teaching (and Assessing!) Grammar and Punctuation∗  

Chauna Ramsey (Columbia Gorge Community College)

This is a collection of cumulative units of study for conventional errors common in student writing. It zeroes in problems typically seen in writing of all types, from the eternal “there/they’re/their” struggle to correct colon use. Units are organized from most simple to most challenging.

Includes: Examples and worksheets

ENG 1320 English Grammar for Professional Writers and Editors [as supplementary resource]

Brehe’s Grammar Anatomy∗

Steven Brehe (University of North Georgia)

Licence:  CC BY-SA 4.0

Brehe’s Grammar Anatomy makes grammar accessible to general and specialist readers alike. This book provides an in-depth look at beginner grammar terms and concepts, providing clear examples with limited technical jargon.

Includes: Practice exercises at the end of each chapter and glossary

ENG 1320 English Grammar for Professional Writers and Editors

Grammar essentials∗.

Excelsior Online Writing Lab (OWL) (LibreTexts)

Last updated: November 2020

Being correct goes beyond the basic grammar that language needs in order to function. Being correct means knowing the rules that a given culture has established to judge the language of individuals. Think about it: many years ago,  ain’t  was not considered incorrect. How might you react to someone using that word today? We speak of this as usage. There are far more usage rules than grammar rules, and they are far more difficult to master. Many of them you just  have to  learn; and, after you learn them, you  have to  use them over and over and over in order to incorporate them into your language.

Formats: Online and PDF

Includes: Examples

English (ENG) – Literature and Composition

Composition and literature: a handbook and anthology∗.

James Sexton (Simon Fraser University) and Derek Soles (Alexander College)

This book is divided into two parts. Part I is a Composition Handbook designed to teach students the components of the writing process and the conventions of various forms of school and college writing assignments. Part II is an Anthology of Literature designed to help students read actively, analyze, understand, enjoy, and appreciate stories, poems, and plays by a diverse and inclusive group of exceptional writers.

Includes: Exercises, examples, study questions, writing assignments, activities, glossaries, and case books

Reviews: BCcampus

ENG 1120 Selected Topics in Literature and Composition

Eng 1124 engaging with literature, writing and literature: composition as inquiry, learning, thinking, and communication∗.

Tanya Long Bennet (University of North Georgia)

Writing and Literature builds a new conversation covering various genres of literature and writing. Students learn the various writing styles appropriate for analyzing, addressing, and critiquing these genres including poetry, novels, dramas, and research writing. The text and its pairing of helpful visual aids throughout emphasizes the importance of critical reading and analysis in producing a successful composition. Designed for a first-year English composition class, this book is filled with short stories and plays, and discussion of literary devices to introduce composition in the context of literary studies. 

Formats: PDF and Word

Includes: Glossary and suggested resources for instructors

Literature, the Humanities, and Humanity∗

Theodore L. Steinberg (SUNY Fredonia)

Literature, the Humanities, and Humanity attempts to make the study of literature more than simply another school subject that students have to take. At a time when all subjects seem to be valued only for their testability, this book tries to show the value of reading and studying literature, even e arlier literature. It shows students, some of whom will themselves become teachers, that literature actually has something to say to them. Furthermore, it shows that literature is meant to be enjoyed, that, as the Roman poet Horace (and his Renaissance disciple Sir Philip Sidney) said, the functions of literature are to teach and to delight. The book will also be useful to teachers who want to convey their passion for literature to their students. After an introductory chapter that offers advice on how to read (and teach) literature, the book consists of a series of chapters that examine individual literary works ranging from The Iliad to Charles Dickens’ Bleak House. These chapters can not substitute for reading the actual works. Rather they are intended to help students read those works. They are attempts to demystify the act of reading and to show that these works, whether they are nearly three thousand or less than two hundred years old, still have important things to say to contemporary readers.

Formats: Pressbooks WebBook, PDF, EPUB, and Word

Reviews: eCampusOntario Open Library – Open Textbook Library – BCcampus

Compact Anthology of World Literature Parts 1, 2, and 3∗

Edited by Laura Getty and Kyounghye Kwon (University of North Georgia)

A world literature class may be the first place that some students have encountered European works, let alone non-Western texts. The emphasis in this anthology, therefore, is on non-Western and European works, with only the British authors who were the most influential to European and non-Western authors (such as Shakespeare, whose works have influenced authors around the world to the present day). In a world literature class, there is no way that a student can be equally familiar with all of the societies, contexts, time periods, cultures, religions, and languages that they will encounter; even though the works presented here are translated, students will face issues such as unfamiliar names and parts of the story (such as puns) that may not translate well or at all. Since these stories are rooted in their cultures and time periods, it is necessary to know the basic context of each work to understand the expectations of the original audience.

The introductions in this anthology are meant to be just that: a basic overview of what students need to know before they begin reading, with topics that students can research further. An open access literature textbook cannot be a history book at the same time, but history is the great companion of literature: The more history students know, the easier it is for them to interpret literature.

These works can help students understand the present, as well. In an electronic age, with this text available to anyone with computer access around the world, it has never been more necessary to recognize and understand differences among nationalities and cultures. The literature in this anthology is foundational, in the sense that these works influenced the authors who followed them.

Formats: PDF

ENG 2112 Classical Backgrounds of English Literature

Compact anthology of world literature ii parts 4, 5, and 6∗.

Edited by Anita Turlington, Mathew Horton, Karen Dodson, Laura Getty, Kyounghye Kwon, and Laura Ng (University of North Georgia)

Texts from a variety of genres and cultures are included in each unit: Age of Reason, Near East and Asia, Romanticism, Realism, Modernism, Postcolonial Literature, and Contemporary Literature.

Formats: PDF and EPUB

Includes: Introduction about authors and texts, discussion questions, and stable links to texts

ENG 3340 Seventeeth-Century Literature [Part 4]

Eng 3341 eighteenth-century literature [part 4], eng 3356 18th-century and romantic fiction [part 5], eng 3364 victorian fiction [part 4], eng 3376 contemporary novel [part 6], eng 3378 american fiction 1900 to the present [part 6], world literature i: beginnings to 1650∗.

Edited by Laura Getty, Kyounghye Kwon, Rhonda Kelley, and Douglas Thomson (University of North Georgia)

Since the dawn of language, humankind has exchanged stories, either through storytellers around a hearth or through scribes tirelessly copying various texts. This literature allows modern audience a window through which we can peer into the distant past. It provides vital clues for the interpretation of history, language, and culture. It is through literature that one may compare and gain a greater understanding of other civilizations.

This anthology comprises three comprehensive collections that provide samples of literature from around the world and across the ages, ranging from some of oldest tales that have survived into modernity to works from the 1650s. These texts provide an opportunity for readers to engage in extensive analysis of the works themselves and the societies that influenced and were influenced by them.

This peer-reviewed World Literature I anthology includes introductory text and images before each series of readings. Sections of the text are divided by time period in three parts: the Ancient World, Middle Ages, and Renaissance, and then divided into chapters by location.

English Literature: Victorians and Moderns∗

James Sexton (Camosun College)

English Literature: Victorians and Moderns  is an anthology with a difference. In addition to providing annotated teaching editions of many of the most  frequently-taught classics of Victorian and Modern poetry, fiction, and drama, it also provides a series of guided research casebooks which make available numerous published essays from open access books and journals, as well as several reprinted critical essays from established learned journals such as English Studies in Canada and the Aldous Huxley Annual with the permission of the authors and editors. Designed to supplement the annotated complete texts of three famous short novels: Henry James’s The Turn of the Screw, Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness , and Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World , each casebook offers cross-disciplinary guided research topics, which will encourage majors in fields other than English to undertake topics in diverse areas, including History, Economics, Anthropology, Political Science, Biology, and Psychology. Selections have also been included to encourage topical, thematic, and generic cross-referencing. Students will also be exposed to a wide range of approaches, including new-critical, psychoanalytic, historical, and feminist.  

Includes: Each selection is accompanied by a variety of study questions and stable internet links to enriching dramatic adaptations, as well as broadcast discussions of selected works and authors. Some of the units afford students the opportunity to explore archival documents and to use them in their own research. Finally, the open text contains 3 practical appendices: a glossary of literary terms, detailed instruction in writing about literature; and thorough guidance in documenting the research paper in accordance with current MLA guidelines.

Reviews: BCcampus – eCampusOntario Open Library

British Literature I Anthology: From the Middle Ages to Neoclassicism and the Eighteenth Century∗

Edited by Bonnie J. Robinson and Laura J. Getty (University of North Georgia)

Featuring over 50 authors and full texts of their works, this anthology follows the shift of monarchic to parliamentarian rule in Britain, and the heroic epic to the more egalitarian novel as genre.

Includes: R eading and review questions

ENG 2105 Introduction to British Literature I: Beginnings to 1700

Eng 3324 medieval literature i, eng 3339 sixteenth-century literature, eng 3341 eighteenth-century literature, british literature ii: romantic era to the twentieth century and beyond∗.

Edited by B.J. Robinson (University of North Georgia)

Featuring 37 authors and full texts of their works, the selections in this open anthology represent the literature developed within and developing through their respective eras. This completely-open anthology will connect students to the conversation of literature that has captivated readers in the past and still holds us now.

Includes: I n-depth biographies of each author, r eading and review questions

ENG 2016 Introduction to British Literature II: 1700 to the Present

Eng 3318 romantic literature, open anthology of earlier american literature.

Edited by Timothy Robbins (Graceland University)

This textbook takes a distinctly socio-historical approach to introduce Early American literature. The anthology will allow students to engage with literature in exciting and dynamic ways. The Open Anthology of Earlier American Literature was initially created by Robin deRosa at Plymouth State University. Working with students, they collected public domain texts, edited them as necessary and created introductions for each to form the beginnings of a new, definitive anthology of Early American Literature.

Formats: Pressbooks WebBook

ENG 2103 Introduction to American Literature I: Beginnings to 1900

Becoming america: an exploration of american literature from precolonial to post-revolution.

Wendy Kurant (University of North Georgia)

Featuring sixty-nine authors and full texts of their works, the selections in this open anthology represent the diverse voices in early American literature. This completely-open anthology will connect students to the conversation of literature that is embedded in American history and has helped shaped its culture. Features:  Contextualizing introductions from Pre- and Early Colonial Literature to Early American Romanticism; Over 70 historical images; In-depth biographies of each author; Instructional Design, including Reading and Review Questions

Writing the Nation: A Concise Introduction to American Literature 1865 to Present

Amy Berke (Middle Georgia State University), Robert Bleil (College of Coastal Georgia), and Jordan Cofer (Abraham Baldwin Agricultural College)

Writing the Nation: A Concise Guide to American Literature 1865 to Present  is a text that surveys key literary movements and the American authors associated with the movement. Topics include late romanticism, realism, naturalism, modernism, and modern literature.

Includes: Learning outcomes, reading and review questions, key terms, and glossary

ENG 2104 Introduction to American Literature II: 1900 to the Present

Prose fiction: an introduction to the semiotics of narrative.

Ignasi Ribó (School of Liberal Arts at Mae Fah Luang University, Thailand)

This concise and highly accessible textbook outlines the principles and techniques of storytelling. It is intended as a high-school and college-level introduction to the central concepts of narrative theory – concepts that will aid students in developing their competence not only in analysing and interpreting short stories and novels, but also in writing them.

This textbook prioritises clarity over intricacy of theory, equipping its readers with the necessary tools to embark on further study of literature, literary theory and creative writing. Building on a ‘semiotic model of narrative,’ it is structured around the key elements of narratological theory, with chapters on plot, setting, characterisation, and narration, as well as on language and theme – elements which are underrepresented in existing textbooks on narrative theory. The chapter on language constitutes essential reading for those students unfamiliar with rhetoric, while the chapter on theme draws together significant perspectives from contemporary critical theory (including feminism and postcolonialism).

ENG 2303 Introduction to Writing Prose Fiction

Naming the unnameable: an approach to poetry for new generations.

Michelle Bonczek Evory (Kalamazoo Community College)

Informed by a writing philosophy that values both spontaneity and discipline, Michelle Bonczek Evory’s  Naming the Unnameable: An Approach to Poetry for New Generations  offers practical advice and strategies for developing a writing process that is centered on play and supported by an understanding of America’s rich literary traditions. With consideration to the psychology of invention, Bonczek Evory provides students with exercises aimed to make writing in its early stages a form of play that gives way to more enriching insights through revision, embracing the writing of poetry as both a love of language and a tool that enables us to explore ourselves and better understand the world.

Formats: Pressbooks WebBook, PDF, and EPUB

ENG 2304 Introduction to Writing Poetry

Eng 3164 advanced workshop in poetry, beyond argument: essaying as a practice of (ex)change.

Sarah Allen (University of Northern Colorado)

Last updated: May 2020

Licence: CC BY-NC-ND 4.0

Beyond Argument  offers an in-depth examination of how current ways of thinking about the writer-page relation in personal essays can be reconceived according to practices in the care of the self — an ethic by which writers such as Seneca, Montaigne, and Nietzsche lived. This approach promises to reinvigorate the form and address many of the concerns expressed by essay scholars and writers regarding the lack of rigorous exploration we see in our students’ personal essays — and sometimes, even, in our own. In pursuing this approach, Sarah Allen presents a version of subjectivity that enables productive debate in the essay, among essays, and beyond.

ENG 2305 Introduction to Writing Creative Non-fiction

Teaching autoethnography: personal writing in the classroom.

Melissa Tombro (The Fashion Institute of Technology)

Teaching Autoethnography: Personal Writing in the Classroom  is dedicated to the practice of immersive ethnographic and autoethnographic writing that encourages authors to participate in the communities about which they write. This book draws not only on critical qualitative inquiry methods such as interview and observation, but also on theories and sensibilities from creative writing and performance studies, which encourage self-reflection and narrative composition. Concepts from qualitative inquiry studies, which examine everyday life, are combined with approaches to the creation of character and scene to help writers develop engaging narratives that examine chosen subcultures and the author’s position in relation to her research subjects. The book brings together a brief history of first-person qualitative research and writing from the past forty years, examining the evolution of nonfiction and qualitative approaches in relation to the personal essay. A selection of recent student writing in the genre as well as reflective student essays on the experience of conducting research in the classroom is presented in the context of exercises for coursework and beyond. Also explored in detail are guidelines for interviewing and identifying subjects and techniques for creating informed sketches and images that engage the reader. This book provides approaches anyone can use to explore their communities and write about them first-hand. The methods presented can be used for a single assignment in a larger course or to guide an entire semester through many levels and varieties of informed personal writing.

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OER by Discipline Guide: University of Ottawa (Version 1.0 - June 2021) Copyright © 2021 by Mélanie Brunet is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License , except where otherwise noted.

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Course sequence

Computer Engineering

General information on course sequences

The course sequence you need to follow is that of the year you first joined your program. For example, if you were admitted into your program in the fall of 2021, you must follow the course sequence of 2021-2022.

Please note:

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ENG 1112 Technical Report Writing

eng 1112 technical report writing

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Course Code: ENG1112 University: University Of Ottawa

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Country: Canada

Question: Describe about the Technical Report Writing For Indigenous People Portrayed On Media.

Answer: Introduction This essay will concentrate on the role of media presenting the condition of indigenous community across Canada. As mentioned before in the proposal, this essay will research on various ways, which are portraying this community on various channels. According to Mastro, Dana: p. 11, it has been observed that both the print and digital media are less interested about presenting the truth about indigenous community. Civilized urban population has not yet explored much the issues and various cultural facts about them. Therefore, it can be said more public channels must come forward to broadcast their grievances regarding the lifestyle issues and facts. The use of social networks has been increasing among the young generation of aboriginal populations due to their dependency on internet because of studies and refreshment, as well as it indicates the revelation of specifics related to Canadian aboriginal culture. Indigenous and aboriginal community is deprived of the media coverage repeatedly as media channels focus on profits based on the consumers’ preferences. Along with finding various ways how the community is presented through different channels of media, this essay will emphasize on the reluctant nature of mass media to broadcast issues and facts related to their ethnicity. The role of media in presenting the community Before the emergence of contemporary media channels, stories used to play the role of passing knowledge from one generation to the next. This was the only form, which resist their culture and language from vanishing from history. Personal narratives have elaborated the experiences maintaining a chronological order, which is helpful to understand the contemporary social and economic structure. The present situation is different from that time as with the approach of social media, there are plenty of available information yet hard to believe, as there are several questions about the authenticity.   Sharing these cultural facts needs special supervision and controlling, as there is a tendency of media to feed public interest by presenting negative stereotypes and biased presentations of the facts. There are several incidents of exploiting Native Americans who have been presented as per public interest rather than being portrayed as per their actual nature. based on the data collected from (), Canada’s indigenous population made up the entire country’s almost 4.5% of population. Even though, they cover a noticeable proportion of the total population the total global population of ethnic background remains underrepresented through contemporary media channels mostly. Evidences can be drawn from (Pierro, 2013) about from the year 211 to 2013 the negative representation of indigenous community has been increased by almost 12% in one of the provinces of Canada. Yet it cannot be ignored that the rate of coverage has also increased from the previous decade. Experts have revealed that it is nothing new for them to remain underrepresented; media persons only highlight them if they feel it will be adequate to regulate the media channels on profit. Media tend to focus on protestations yet that did not generate much audience’s interest. That is why media coverage has been lowered. The media, instead of focusing on the issues of the indigenous community, presents the variety of traditional clothing, musical instruments and dance moves. This helps the audiences to identify the differences regarding social structure, customs, and manner of dressing and completely new genre of music. As mentioned before, instead of highlighting the reasons behind their protests and strikes media consistently heightens the differences, which works as a barrier and creates less interest about aboriginal issues among the urban audiences. Apart from Canada, in case of Mexico, the official data suggests the indigenous population is comparatively small than other American territories yet holds a strong historical background. People over there perceives a Mexican indigenous people who has perfectly maintained the true essence of Mexican culture. there are two kinds of indigenous people can be spotted who has prejudice against adapting new culture and urban lifestyle and the other half is who are already adopted with the advanced lifestyle. As described in Muñiz, Carlos, et al. television as one of the channels of media tends to stereotypes the ethnic groups in news scoops or fictional television series. This has a negative impact on the society as they start to believe on those stereotypes and develop prejudices against the groups belongs to minority population. Therefore, the role of imagination has become important in terms of creating market friendly stories regarding ethnicity. The processes are interesting how the information are channelized. In case the media is used as the authentic medium of spreading information, it can help the population other than ethnic background to develop their judgments, shapes right attitude and help to maintain appropriate behaviour regarding aboriginal community. Media channels can be considered as a mode of gaining knowledge and learn new facts. It also helps to develop perception and strong believe about the stereotypes if portrayed in a negative way. Hence, it can be stated that wrong depiction of the community traditions and customs influence the perception of people to the extent that people start to evaluate the groups based on those aspects too. The media channels if continue to portray indigenous groups in a negative way it has a long-term effect on the learning of rest of the society members. Apart from their traditions and unknown facts about them, media have opportunity of covering aboriginal health as well in terms of finding new ways of research. A consistent relation of mistrust has been growing as researchers are imposing their own perception for their benefit, which is increasing the issues instead of developing solutions.  They have always been described in a way where they are portrayed as a helpless deprived community and negative points have been highlighted more than the positive ones. The self-esteem of aboriginal community has been highly affected by the world perception. That is why; aboriginal people claim their bad relationship with the media channels. It has been understood that media channels and their messages are controlled by the pattern of consumers’ preferences. Mass media will be interested to show the facts related to aboriginal communities if they feel it will help to regulate the business. Therefore, in spite of having so many associations, media is not taking enough initiatives to represent them before the audiences. Vowel’s representation Among the five parts, of Vowel, Chelsea, the first one evaluates the language complexities followed by a critical presentation of culture and identity of those ethic people. Whereas, part three describes the stereotypes like they are mostly engaged in alcohol abuse or they do not have their own house to live and so on, part 4 reveals the real life incidents of violence, difficult access to clean drinking water, their farmland in prairies and how Canadian media has imposed these incidents of violence. The final one discusses their right on lands and education. The book has been written concentrating on indigenous perspective as settlers rather than collective interest. The entire book talks about the differences, which are actually there rather than making the stories up. Representation in films The films mostly highlights the practice of racism by portraying native Americans in most of the films and television series. There was a culture of showing them as arrogant uncivilized people later the way of portraying changed and their historical background was highlighted. The clothes made of wild animal’s skin and fur, always engages in fighting these kind of things were shown when it comes to frame a ‘Red-Indian’ character. This was the term what was being used for the native Americans. Despite being identified as a separate community from the so-called civilized community, they were being called as ‘Indians’ as they used to perceive Indians to be uncivilized and savage too. Besides positive portrayal can be seen, where they have been praised for their dusky beauty, morality and culture. Conclusion The media plays a crucial role in shaping mass perception. Therefore, the channels must be cautious enough while broadcasting the contents. It must be understood by the people that fictional stories are being narrated with the purpose of entertainment. Instead of believing on them, they can try to know the unknown facts about indigenous community.  The perception of Indian as uncivilized and savage without even knowing the long history of colonization and royalty is baseless and hence calling indigenous people as Indigenous perceiving their uncivilized nature in parameter of urban life is foolishness. Films, television serious, stories and even newspapers may portray several imaginary facts just to regulate the business or to entertain yet the books of history and researches on indigenous people might be helpful to present the actual information about the ethnic communities. It is true that there are differences but standing in the present day, instead of believing over stereotypes it would be better if real life issues have been addressed whether by the government or by the fellow settlers and citizens. Above all, media can bridge the gap between these two communities. References Mastro, Dana. “Why the media’s role in issues of race and ethnicity should be in the spotlight.” Journal of Social Issues71.1 (2015): 1-16. Muñiz, Carlos, et al. “Screens to see the world. Television stereotypes of the mexican indigenous population and the generation of prejudice.” (2013). Pierro, Robin, et al. “Buried voices: Media coverage of Aboriginal issues in Ontario.” Journalists for Human Rights(2013). Vowel, Chelsea. “Indigenous writes: a guide to First Nations.” Métis & Inuit issues in Canada (2016).

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    ENG 1112 Technical Report Writing (3 units) Practice in the writing of technical reports. Topics include exposition, argumentation, presentation of technical data, and effective communication. Frequent written exercises and development of composition skills. Use of Writing Centre resources required outside regular class hours.

  3. Test 1 ENG 1112K February 1 2024

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    1. Report on sources [with rough draft] 10% Oct 6 2. Report on a problem [with rough draft] 15% Nov 3 3. Progress report + visual [with rough draft] 25% Nov 24 Assignment due dates: Assignments done out of class must be handed in to your DGD leader through Brightspace by 11:59 pm EST (midnight) on the scheduled due date.

  5. ENGLISH ENG 1112 : Technical report writing

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    English 1112C Technical Report Writing Fall 2022 Course Outline Professor: Lynda Morrissey PhD Office hours: Virtual - by appointment Email: [email protected] Learning Sessions: Fridays 19:00-21:50 (including DGD period) Official course description: Practice in the writing of technical reports.

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    Technical Report Writing ENG 1112 J Winter 2021. Professor: Dr. Paul Graves E-mail: pgraves@uottawa Office Hours: TBA Teaching Assistants: Kaitlyn Arsenault (karse088@uottawa) Katherine Rainville (krain012@uottawa) Course Description.

  10. Course sequence: Computer Engineering

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    You're likely writing one short report at a reading level below that of the sources you'll be citing, and very likely over the course of a whole semester where you're handing in chunks of the report as you go. Literally try to emulate any other technical report that you are citing using the instructions your prof gives you. 4.

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